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Comment: Re:Anyone else concerned? (Score 3) 164

by TheMeuge (#48811983) Attached to: Man Saves Wife's Sight By 3D Printing Her Tumor

Is ist just me or is anyone else actually concerned that a have-a-go engineer can apparently quite easily achieve significantly bettr results than a team of so-called expert doctors in their own field?

RTFA please.
The description does indeed try to imply that the above is the case. But it's far from the truth, as much as internet armchair experts would like to believe.

The article itself appears to state that the problem was that 1) the initial advice was to wait, which after (appropriately) consulting with a number of experts they had done, and a followup showed progression. Even the first advice was not totally misplaced. Then what happened was that he suggested that the neurosurgeons basically invent a procedure specifically for him, and used 3D printing to create a model for them. The result was he did find someone willing to try (my guess is they refused the conventional approach) a less invasive procedure that removed 95% of the tumor. Now that may sound revolutionary, but neurosurgery is a tricky business, and depending on the tumor 95% may be equivalent to buying a little time while doing nothing at all, especially since they already knew that the tumor was growing aggressively. If the conventional approach would have had more of a chance of removing more of the tumor, possibly all of it with negative margins, that would be a far more definitive approach. Doctors aren't always right, but if you get a sufficiently experienced expert opinion, it'll usually reflect what is possible to do currently, with a reasonable margin of both safety and success.

Comment: Re:No bigger than ... (Score 0) 325

by kharchenko (#48550761) Attached to: Heathrow Plane In Near Miss With Drone

This is what chicken hitting an engine looks like. The engine effectively explodes. The engine gets a "passing" grade in such a test as long as the blades flying out of the explosion are contained by the enclosure and don't immediately destroy the rest of the plane. If you think this is a minor event, you're deluding yourself.

Comment: Re:Goodhart's Law (Score 0) 185

by TheMeuge (#48333049) Attached to: Big Data Knows When You Are About To Quit Your Job

When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure.

So, yeah, as soon as people figure out what it is that is being measured, expect them to alter their behavior to make that measure useless.

Tell that to Obamacare.
MDs and institutions now get less money when they take care of sicker patients whose socioeconomic status causes them to be less compliant and have more adverse outcomes. Congratulations, now no one wants those patients doubly. Oh, and they still can't pay for health insurance.

Comment: Re:Well (Score 1) 594

by kharchenko (#48296833) Attached to: Space Tourism Isn't Worth Dying For

You'd say that if you knew nothing of the early American space program. Of course, having demonstrated no knowledge of that history your opinion on the matter is pretty much worthless.

Perhaps you know of some secret space plane that went into orbit before Apollo, but this would be news for the rest of the world. So cite or STFU.

Comment: Re:How about... (Score 1) 349

by TheMeuge (#48292715) Attached to: Suspected Ebola carriers in the U.S. ...

It is a FACT that ebola is ONLY CONTAGIOUS when symptoms are present.

Only if you ignore the last fifteen years of established science. Many people get Ebola and never show symptoms at all. We know this because they test positive for the antibodies to Ebola. Those people are believed to have had the virus in their blood at some point during the course of the disease. Therefore, under the right circumstances, it is possible for someone not showing symptoms of Ebola to spread the disease. It is highly unlikely, and has not been documented to occur in the wild so far (that we know of), but claiming that it is impossible based solely on limited anecdotal evidence is downright terrifyingly bad science.

I'd be happy to dig up the citations again if you really want me to, or you can just Google it yourself.

That's just patently wrong. Having antibodies to Ebola doesn't mean you had the disease, it means you were exposed to the virus. There was a study in 2000 Lancet which looked at seroconversion in close contacts of individuals ill with ebola, which showed that 11/24 people seroconverted in the absence of symptoms. However, the scientists were unable to isolate virus from these patients. This suggests that there are people who have either a defect in the ability of Ebola to infect them, or their innate immune response is able to deal with Ebola. There is no evidence from the last 30 years that there any asymptomatic individual acts as a carrier.

Comment: Re: This is related (Score 1) 294

by TheMeuge (#48270379) Attached to: Ebola Forecast: Scientists Release Updated Projections and Tracking Maps

That's not insightful.

If you cannot isolate infectious virus or amplify its genetic material from someone's bodily fluids, they are not infectious.

Making assertions based on panic is not reasonable. Maybe if the nurse wasn't treated like a criminal leper on coming home, she wouldn't be lashing out and would stay home.

Comment: Re: US Citizenship (Score 1) 190

by TheMeuge (#48268625) Attached to: Labor Department To Destroy H-1B Records

Are you kidding be. Would be stupid to do that. The whole point is that many of not most H1B ers are working for less because they'd much rather be in this country. The threat of losing the visa it's what keeps them indentured servants. Just look at the biomedical research industry. No one will ever give them citizenship ebb masse... it would destroy the system by which having a PhD became about as profitable as being on welfare.

From Sharp minds come... pointed heads. -- Bryan Sparrowhawk

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