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German Court Rules Adblock Plus Is Legal 279

Posted by Soulskill
from the non-crazy-software-judgments dept.
An anonymous reader writes: Following a four-month trial, a German court in Hamburg has ruled that the practice of blocking advertising is perfectly legitimate. Germany-based Eyeo, the company that owns Adblock Plus, has won a case against German publishers Zeit Online and Handelsblatt. These companies operate Zeit.de, Handelsblatt.com, and Wiwo.de. Their lawsuit, filed on December 3, charged that Adblock Plus should not be allowed to block ads on their websites. While the decision is undoubtedly a big win for users today, it could also set a precedent for future lawsuits against Adblock Plus and any other tool that offers similar functions. The German court has essentially declared that users are legally allowed to control what happens on their screens and on their computers while they browse the Web.

Comment: Re:Nerds care about politics too (Score 3, Interesting) 676

by kharchenko (#49459915) Attached to: Hillary Clinton Declares 2016 Democratic Presidential Bid

If Warren won't run, I'll vote for Bernie Sanders, the only Independant in Congress.

I sympathize with your view, but I hope you're not fooling yourself that someone who actually wants to stand up for the little guy has any chance of being nominated. Warren is demonized as a left-wing nut, and the most extreme thing she tried to do was to lower the student loan rate to match that the Fed is giving to the banks. Someone should import a few real left-wing nuts, put them up in some reality TV show, just so people get some sense as to what that really means.

Comment: Re:Way too many humanities majors (Score 1) 397

by kharchenko (#49381559) Attached to: Why America's Obsession With STEM Education Is Dangerous

The study of humanities can provide something called "perspective", which I find lacking in a lot of otherwise intelligent people who happen to be engineers.

...

Steve Jobs famously dropped out of college, but dropped in to take things like calligraphy courses

Yes, if there's any activity that promotes critical thinking it's painstaking and systematic reproduction and of pre-defined letter shapes.

Comment: Re:well.. (Score 2) 760

Except most speed limits are complete bullshit, at least in the US.

There are highways in NYC that have a 40mph minimum and a 45 mph maximum. Think that has anything to do with the ability to fine pretty much anyone at any time?

Roads have pretty natural speed limits regardless of the imposed limit, and it would be trivial to figure them out by simply taking an average over the course of a few days. I would venture a guess for the majority of the highways it would be substantially higher than the posted limit.

Remember - speed doesn't kill... a line of courteous drivers, observing correct leading distance and allowing free merges can probably go 100+ on a modern road in modern cars. Recklessness, carelessness, and needless maneuvers is what kills, not to mention distraction and intoxication. Observe Germany's autobahns for an example,

Comment: Re:basically how the UAE works (Score 1) 247

by kharchenko (#49191113) Attached to: Facebook Rant Lands US Man In UAE Jail

I never understood the whole 'take your passport' thing. I was under impression that if I show up at the US embassy, say that I am a US citizen, that my passport was forcefully taken from me, and I want to go home, they'll go through some checks and give me the documents I need to go back. No?

Comment: Re:Anyone else concerned? (Score 3) 164

by TheMeuge (#48811983) Attached to: Man Saves Wife's Sight By 3D Printing Her Tumor

Is ist just me or is anyone else actually concerned that a have-a-go engineer can apparently quite easily achieve significantly bettr results than a team of so-called expert doctors in their own field?

RTFA please.
The description does indeed try to imply that the above is the case. But it's far from the truth, as much as internet armchair experts would like to believe.

The article itself appears to state that the problem was that 1) the initial advice was to wait, which after (appropriately) consulting with a number of experts they had done, and a followup showed progression. Even the first advice was not totally misplaced. Then what happened was that he suggested that the neurosurgeons basically invent a procedure specifically for him, and used 3D printing to create a model for them. The result was he did find someone willing to try (my guess is they refused the conventional approach) a less invasive procedure that removed 95% of the tumor. Now that may sound revolutionary, but neurosurgery is a tricky business, and depending on the tumor 95% may be equivalent to buying a little time while doing nothing at all, especially since they already knew that the tumor was growing aggressively. If the conventional approach would have had more of a chance of removing more of the tumor, possibly all of it with negative margins, that would be a far more definitive approach. Doctors aren't always right, but if you get a sufficiently experienced expert opinion, it'll usually reflect what is possible to do currently, with a reasonable margin of both safety and success.

"Dump the condiments. If we are to be eaten, we don't need to taste good." -- "Visionaries" cartoon

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