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Comment: Re:There might be hope for a decent adaptation (Score 1) 316

by shutdown -p now (#49192473) Attached to: 'The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress' Coming To the Big Screen

Incest is any kind of sexual activity with a close relative. What you describe is only a problem if such activity results in offspring. We've had contraception for a long time now, not to mention that not all sex is even potentially procreative in the first place.

Comment: Re:Given the depth of surveillance (Score 1) 35

My guess is the robo-call companies pay them big bucks to harass everyone, so the telcos have no motivation to do shit about the problem.

You can also pay for the privilege of not being harassed. You can block ten numbers, you can block numbers without caller ID, and you can get caller ID. And you can pay for each of these features.

Comment: Re:What is the point? (Score 1) 294

I don't know about Canadians and Americans in general, but it's certainly true about border agents. I'm not saying that everybody in CBP is an asshole, but based on mine (several times per year for three years) history of travel back and forth between two countries, the chances of running into an asshole were way higher when travelling south.

Comment: Re:What they really proved... (Score 1) 115

There in no basis for assuming that these conditions would ever occur.

You mean, except for the fact that we observe each of them occurring separately, and are not aware of any reason why having one occur would exclude the other? From those premises alone it follows that it is a statistic certainty that they will all occur at the same time eventually.

Comment: Re:Sure thing, Republicans. (Score 1) 417

by shutdown -p now (#49190265) Attached to: White House Threatens Veto Over EPA "Secret Science" Bills

To remind, alcohol was actually illegal for a while. Then it was legalized again, because the society understood that banning it leads to a worse result overall.

Why does the state even need to be in the business of telling sane adults what they can and cannot put into their own body?

Comment: Re:Really? Come on now, you should know better. (Score 1) 336

by drinkypoo (#49188287) Attached to: Would You Need a License To Drive a Self-Driving Car?

What I wanted to show by bringing up this example is that in current airplane design, there are circumstances in which automation is known to fail (in this case, unreliable/defective sensors). In these circumstances, the systems are designed to give control back to the pilot. The rationale for this is quite clear.

Yes, like I said, it's to make the passengers feel good. Because as we have seen, the pilots depend on the same sensors that the autopilot does. Airliners aren't fighters, you don't fly by the seat of your pants. By the time your inner-ear-gyro tells you that there's a problem, you're already screwed. Which was precisely what happened.

How in the shit are pitot tubes still icing anyway? Why is heating the tube not a thing which works? Heating elements are not new technology. We should really be able to manage this by now.

Comment: Re:I have said it before (Score 1) 336

by drinkypoo (#49188227) Attached to: French Nuclear Industry In Turmoil As Manufacturer Buckles

you mean the basic engineering error where the project manager wouldn't sign off due to the mistake made in concrete formulation so he was fired and a more lenient approver installed in his place?

How about the basic engineering error of siting a reactor somewhere even ancient Japanese could have told you was a mistake? How about the basic engineering error of not protecting your on-site backup power, which is mandatory for maintenance? How about the basic engineering error of storing spent fuel rods on top of reactors? All of those are more significant than the formulation of the concrete.

Comment: Re:I developed this crap when I hit 35 (Score 1) 53

by drinkypoo (#49188195) Attached to: Ubisoft Has New Video Game Designed To Treat Lazy Eye

My right eye does that when I'm tired, but my eyelid is actually notably different on that side, I've too much of it. My father had both of his eyelids trimmed back by the VA to try to treat his headaches, apparently only one side of my head has this congenital defect. Probably have it trimmed up next time I go out of the country.

Comment: Re:Define 'desktop' ... (Score 1) 409

XP was supported for a very very long time.

Microsoft is not about to make that same mistake again.

MY PC is built from sabertooth Asus series with solid caps, capicators, vrm, etc. Same with gtx 770 video card. It will last 10 years :-)

Irrelevant. We're talking about the software. My motherboard also has solid caps. Whoop de doo.

Sure Intel will try to sabatoge atom with no SOC drivers so they can cut back on support costs and keep prices low

You mean like AMD did with the Mobile Athlon 64, and R690M chipset? It's disingenuous to call out Intel here.

Many of us will stick with 7 even more so than with XP during the last time.

No you won't, because Microsoft won't keep supporting it into eternity. They had to do that because they wrote long contracts. They won't have done that with Windows 7. XP was a stone around their necks.

Some people have a great ambition: to build something that will last, at least until they've finished building it.

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