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Comment: Re:Is it even possible anymore? (Score 1) 287

by jhoger (#45692543) Attached to: More Students Learn CS In 3 Days Than Past 100 Years

The first thing you need to understand is that what you are doing isn't all that different from what any other programmer, certainly not any other web programmer does.

Knockout is a library and ajax is a pattern. Any developer worth anything will be able to pick them up by looking at existing code and doing a little reading and experimenting.

Comment: Re: You seem a bit confused (Score 1) 157

by jhoger (#45631267) Attached to: About 25% of HealthCare.gov Applications Have Errors

There's a big difference between being $15k in the hole and 100s of thousands if dollars in the hole. When you talk about pre ACA medical bankruptcies you're talking about big money. A $15k debt is something most people could manage. And if they can't manage it then they shouldn't buy a Bronze plan.

Comment: Re: Stop with the excuses. (Score 1) 334

Uh, no the Republicans do not have clean hands in this foaled rollout.

By refusing to set up the state exchanges they shifted a massive burden to the Feds unplanned for in the law. Then, they refused to expand funding for this massive integration effort. Think about it... Most of the state exchanges are doing fine. Why? Because they only have to meet one state's requirements. The Feds were forced by Republican tactics to handle the differing requirements for 30+ states.

Comment: Re:Why assembly? (Score 1) 121

by jhoger (#37255182) Attached to: A Talk With Syllable OS Lead Developer Kaj de Vos

"To get any boost of performance over C, you have to be an extremely good assembly coder..."

Well that may be true but it's a distinction without a difference. I find most serious assembly language "coders" from the CS side of the house are excellent programmers/engineers. They are going to write MUCH faster assembly programs than any compiler will generate. They understand modern coding patterns... OOP, state charts, algorithmic complexity but they adapt techniques to fit a given problem on a given machine far more efficiently than a good C programmer. With C and certainly CPP you're locked into a certain development style that encourages maintainability over all else. When you're programming in assembly language you have more degrees of freedom to optimize and the rules for "maintainable" code are quite a bit more liberal.

Comment: Re:What these Democrats don't realize... (Score 1) 1128

by jhoger (#34719152) Attached to: Democrats Crowdsourcing To Vote Palin In Primaries

*Was* a community organizer. Your meme has expired. Barack Obama is PRESIDENT. He is the only man eligible to be President aside from Jimmy Carter that can claim that, period, end of story. He has experience being the most powerful executive in the world.

Sarah Palin on the other hand... hmm... governor of a state of low population, couldn't hack it and quit.

Comment: Re:Mod Parent Up Please! (Score 1) 945

by jhoger (#34695698) Attached to: The Right's War On Net Neutrality

You are right. The FCC can't grant powers to itself. If it does overreach, it gets spanked in the courts. So it is unclear what you are frightened about... the checks and balances are in place, and by your own example, quite effective.

The current rule making, as all successful rule making, is based on EXISTING AUTHORITY ALREADY GRANTED BY CONGRESS. The FCC tried to use its existing authority to create net neutrality rules. The court didn't like how they justified their authority so they sent the FCC back to the drawing board with reasoning that forms a roadmap for the current iteration of the rules. That was version 1.0. This is version 2.0.

Consider the pace at which Congress is able to pass laws. It is glacially slow. In our system of government, enforcement and interpretation are left to the executive branch and the courts. It is the only thing that makes the whole system work... that other branches closer to the practical problems of implementing the law are left to "fill in the blanks." Congress INTENTIONALLY leaves those blanks because it cannot predict every eventuality.

The reward of a thing well done is to have done it. -- Emerson

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