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Comment First, make a list of areas you'd like to live (Score 4, Insightful) 464

Because there's "fixed" things about every place in the country that will not be changing.

For example, if you can't stand heat and humidity, you can eliminate the South. If you can't stand snow or cold winters, you can eliminate much of the Northern parts of the country. If you can't stand commie liberal bastards running everything, that's going to eliminate some places. If you can't stand conservative religious nutjobs running everything, that's going to eliminate other places.

Once you have your list, go to a big-name job site and look at the count of job postings in the last two weeks for your kind of work.

If the place has 5 listings, you better REALLY love the companies, and be ready to move if there's downsizing. If the place has one thousand job listings, you'll have your choice of employers.

From that quick search, cross off any place that doesn't fit well. That should leave you with a relatively small number of places, which you can more thoroughly research and possibly visit.

Comment Re:Who gives a shit? (Score 1) 578

No, the present mess began when we deposed the secular tyrants.

The French and British drew most of the borders of the "middle east" at the end of WWI when they carved up the Ottoman Empire.

The borders were drawn to suit the French and British, instead of along cultural boundaries. The only way to keep those countries together was secular despots. With those dead or losing power, you unleash the chaos created by westerners drawing lines to suit their political needs instead of what the local population wanted.

And that chaos is going to get worse. For example, as Iraq breaks into three countries, the newly-formed Kurdistan will cause problems with the significant Kurdish population in Turkey.

Comment Have you actually demonstrated you need C++ yet? (Score 1) 296

Have you actually demonstrated that the higher-level languages you are more familiar with just can not possibly do the job? And keep in mind both RAM and disk are cheap, so "just add more" may work if saving space is your motivation for "granular control".

Whip up a testbed in the higher-level languages you are more familiar with to simulate a load test, and see what sort of performance you get. Zero bells/whistles, just "how much of data that vaguely resembles what I'll be seeing can I shove through the pipe.

If that shows you don't get good enough performance, then try one of the tools that will generate a native binary from the higher-level language, and see if that is good enough.

Often our intuition of what can be done with these systems is off by several orders of magnitude. So make sure you really need it before you go all-native, especially because you're less familiar with all-native. For example, latency over a typical Internet connection means you'll be network-bound no matter what language you write it in, so write it in whatever you're most comfortable with.

Also, if there's particular operations that are really the bottleneck, consider writing the rest of the program in a higher level language, and writing the bottleneck in C or C++. All the high-level languages have some sort of native interface.

Comment Re:The Dark Age returns (Score 1) 479

You shouldn't be trying to refute them. You should be presenting arguments for the fence-sitters that read the post who might be swayed by your argument.

Do you say the same about people who claim the government has actually been taken over by lizard-like aliens?
How about the people who claim blacks are inferior to whites? Or that women can't do math?

Sometimes, a position is so laughable it does not deserve to be treated with respect.

Comment Re:I don't get the point of this thing... (Score 1) 217

You don't get it because your first sentence is wrong.

The Navy is moving to all-electric propulsion. So they won't have steam turbines.

Also, you seem to think the steam is teleported to the catapult. High pressure steam pipe versus high voltage cable? I'll take the cable every time.

As for smoother acceleration, you can't do that with a launch catapult on an aircraft carrier. There isn't enough time for nice, smooth acceleration. Instead, steam pressure builds up in the piston until it literally breaks the rod holding the catapult back. A new rod is obviously used for each launch.

Comment Re:Google Fiber (Score 2) 229

So...don't leave Comcast or AT&T for a competitor, because that competitor might quit and might sell their infrastructure to Comcast or AT&T. Despite the fact that Comcast/AT&T already have their own infrastructure - after all, Google was a competitor.

Methinks you need to do your last sentence a little more.

Comment Re:Qustion on US views (Score 2) 289

Oddities in the US political system mean that the only stable governing system is two political parties.

One of those parties is currently ruled by fear. Whatever Fox tells them to fear, they will fear. Even if it makes no logical sense. Members of that party are currently terrified that routine military exercises are a pretext for the federal government conquering Texas. Never mind that Texas is already conquered and subject to the federal government. There's also gems like "Get your government hands out of my Medicare!!". Medicare being the government program to provide health insurance to the elderly.

Much of the medical and pharmaceutical industries paid to generate a great deal of fear over government-backed healthcare. So members of that party are utterly against it. Despite the fact that the massively convoluted system created to keep those entities in business while providing more health insurance is actually working.

ISPs have not yet paid to generate a great deal of fear over government-provided Internet service.

"Trust me. I know what I'm doing." -- Sledge Hammer