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Comment Re:Already here (Score 1) 412

Switzerland is not planning it at all. This is just a popular initiative that will maybe be voted by the citizens in the future, and the response is actually granted to be no.

Popular initiative is a normal political process in Switzerland. There can propose surprising changes to the constitution, even if the government don't like it. Most of them are in fact a way to group together the peoples that have a new idea on how the law should be and stay only a this stage. This allow to have political discussion in a higher level for everyone. That said, the statistic show that this is mostly a way to let's some groups face the reality of what the country think. This is still a useful process, because it allow more peoples to understand the reality and then reduce the unrealistic dreams. Some initiatives are also to force the government to produce a contre-initiative; usually the former is retired and citizens only vote of the second. This last process have proved to be efficient to let's the citizens steering the government on a balanced compromise. Some details here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

Citizens here are commonly requested to vote on a dozen of law changes per year. There can be initiatives from the government, or initiatives from citizens, or referendum from citizens. I hope that more countries will get this kind of political system.

Comment For me Postgres is #1 (Score 1) 122

I use databases in embedded products.

Oracle is proprietary and probably not free.
MariaDB (MySQL) are not reliable, verified the hard way multiple times.
MongoDB is not structured; some found that fun, I found them horrible (for example to update the field of a record).
Postgresql is free, very reliable, and the last couple of versions can even manage unstructured data for the fanatics.

So the big shared part of the system consist in structured tables and notifications, while the clients applications that connect to it can store in JSON there private data if there like this format. Very powerful and run smoothly even on a tiny 0.5GHz Cortex-A5.
 

Comment Re:So a national emergency gets declared and... (Score 3, Informative) 115

Did you realize that your are talking with the legitimate choice of French citizen ? For sure there are not your enemy, even if you disagree on how to act.As a Swiss citizen I would be more than happy to see France in a better political health. This could be a bit harsh to read for you, but I describes actual French political system as a "monarchie républicaine" that are not so far from the old "monarchie constitutionelle" and "monarchie absolue". Basically the the president have far too much power in the whole government system. This lay down to basic math:

When you have only a single party that can win the election, the system tend to make 50% peoples against the other 50%. The frustration is high, so any problem will make the believe that the opposition party will be better, so the system will oscillate near 50% frustration. After some cycle the peoples eventually realize that the two main parties never meet there goals, so a other one will gain support as the situation degrade. At some point you have 3 parties, and whenever to one that win he is almost granted to have near 66% of frustration against it. So it look like having 50% frustration is the best possible score? Wait!

In Switzerland, instead of a president, we experience since more than 150 years a federal council composed on 7 peoples from a range of leading parties. This make the vast majority of the peoples with different political orientation represented up to the head of state. The frustration is then lowered to the the peoples that don't have representation, probably below 20%.

Just winning an election is not enough, you still have to negotiate with the others to make a positive move.

Comment A experience with a cheap notebook (Score 1) 207

I just buy a cheap notebook based on the Atom Z3735F 1.3GHz, 2G of DDR and 64G of eMMC. While the processor is 64 bits, the UEFI is for 32 bits only, so no easy way to install a 64 bit Linux distribution on it. First step was to go into the UEFI setup to disable the secure boot, then...
I tried Ubuntu 15.10 32 bits, and the installer don't even boot from a USB memory.
I tried Debian 8.2 32 bits, the installer booted from the USB memory up to the selection menu, but whenever I chose the text or graphic installer, the screen go black with flashing small white lines across the screen, a bit like a old CRT that lost the synchronization.
I tried the last daily Debian installer without more success.
So no chance for me. The workaround was to install Debian 8.2 32 bits inside VirtualBox on top of Windows 10.
My conclusion is that very cheap notebook are designed for 32 bits Windows 10 only and that nothing is tested to allow installing a Linux distribution.

Comment Re:You are all aware (Score 1) 143

GPS and PTP both broadcast TAI and UTC-TAI that sum up the past leap seconds, so your claim is not completely correct. I will add that GPS and PTP both lack a method to broadcast the leap second history table required to safely compute time in the past at the second precision. NTP need a major protocol upgrade to fix his multiples issues, or PTP need to be broadcasted as NTP is today.

Comment Re:first proposed in 2004, not resolved before 202 (Score 1) 143

It's not the usual process of ITU decision that is the cause of the rejection. The cause is the fact that the proposition itself is stupid and make the problem even worst. To be certain that the programmers take seriously the fact that the duration of day is variable the adjustment code path must occur more often. The most effective way will be to define the civil time by a day counter and a offset since the start of that day. The day duration can be adjusted periodically. The programmed will know that the day is not 86400 second and the day increment code path will be tested every night.

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