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+ - C Code On GitHub Has the Most 'Ugly Hacks'->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett writes: An analysis of GitHub data shows that C developers are creating the most ugly hacks — or are at least the most willing to admit to it. To answer the question of which programming language produces the most ugly hacks, ITworld's Phil Johnson first used the search feature on GitHub, looking for code files that contained the string 'ugly hack'. In that case, C comes up first by a wide margin, with over 181,000 code files containing that string. The rest of the top ten languages were PHP (79k files), JavaScript (38k), C++ (22k), Python (19k), Text (11k), Makefile (11k), HTML, (10k), Java (7k), and Perl (4k). Even when controlling for the number of repositories, C wins the ugly-hack-athon by a landslide, Johnson found.
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+ - MacKeeper May Have To Pay Millions In Class-Action Suit->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh writes: If you use a Mac, you probably recognize MacKeeper from the omnipresent popup ads designed to look vaguely like system warnings urging you to download the product and use it to keep your computer safe. Now the Ukranian company behind the software and the ads may have to pay millions in a class action suit that accuses them of exaggerating security problems in order to convince customers to download the software.
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+ - The Internet Of Things Will Swamp The Cloud's Capabilities->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh writes: With "the cloud" being one of the most relentlessly promoted buzzwords of the last five years, you'd be forgiven for thinking it's the solution to every problem imaginable. If you're deploying any kind of Internet of Things app or devices, the amount of data you'll be getting will quickly swamp what the public cloud is capable of — and you'll need access to a dedicated colo facility in short order.
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+ - Court Rules Warrant Not Needed for Cell Phone Location Data->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett writes: Historical cell tower location data is not private information owned by customers but by the mobile carrier, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit ruled Tuesday. The court affirmed a district court's convictions of defendant Quartavius Davis, charged with multiple crimes in connection with a string of seven armed robberies in South Florida in 2010. Police obtained more than 11,600 location records over 67-day period from carrier MetroPCS in an effort to track Davis' movements. The location data police obtained did not pinpoint Davis' locations and it's owned by the carrier, not the customer, the court said Tuesday. 'Those cell tower records were created by MetroPCS, stored on its own premises, and subject to its control,' Judge Frank Hull wrote.
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+ - French Lawmakers Take First Step Toward Gathering All Communications Metadata->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett writes: Following attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo and a supermarket in Paris in January, the government rushed out a bill that will allow French intelligence services to collect communications metadata on the entire country’s phone calls and Internet traffic, in some cases installing their own equipment on operators’ networks. Today, the French National Assembly approved the bill by 438 votes to 86. The bill still faces a number of obstacles before it can become law, though.
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+ - Netflix Open-Sources Security Incident Management Tool->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett writes: Netflix has released under an open-source license an internal tool it developed to manage a deluge of security alerts and incidents. Called FIDO (Fully Integrated Defense Operation), the tool is designed to research, score and categorize threats in order to speed up handling of the most urgent ones. FIDO is available on GitHub.
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+ - Singapore's Prime Minister Shares His C++ Sudoku Solver Code->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett writes: Several weeks ago, during a speech at the Founders Forum Smart Nation Singapore Reception, Singapore’s prime minister Lee Hsien Loong said that he used to enjoy programming, and that the last program he wrote was a Sudoku solver in C++. To back that up, earlier today he announced (on Facebook and Twitter) that his code is available to download. He wrote on Facebook that he wrote the program 'several years ago' and that the code does 'a backtrack search, choosing the next cell to guess which minimises the fanout.'
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+ - Maritime cybersecurity firm: 37% of Microsoft servers vulnerable to hacking->

Submitted by colinneagle
colinneagle writes: A report from maritime cybersecurity firm CyberKeel claims that spot spot checks at 50 different maritime sites revealed that 37% of the servers running Microsoft were still vulnerable because they had not been patched.

But what's most interesting is what happens when hackers can breach security in shipping environments, including one case in which "drug gangs were able to smuggle entire container loads of cocaine through Antwerp, one of Belgium's largest ports, after its hackers breached the port's IT network," said Rear Adm. Marshall Lytle, assistant commandant responsible for USCG Cyber Command.

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+ - Is Vi vs. Emacs the Programmer's Version of 'Fight of the Century'?->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett writes: Pacquiao-Mayweather is (seemingly) on everyone's mind these days, but the title 'Fight of the Century' could just as easily go to one of the perennial battles over the best tools, systems, and conventions to use or follow. As classic arguments go, there's Vi vs. Emacs, tabs vs. spaces, static typing vs. dynamic typing.
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+ - Apple Confirms Tattoos Can Interfere With Apple Watch's Heart Rate Sensor-> 1

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett writes: Some watch functions require direct contact with the skin to work. If the device can’t detect a pulse, it assumes it isn’t being worn, shutting downs apps and requiring people to enter their passcode. Turning off the wrist-detection function solves the issue, but prevents people from using Apple Pay. 'Permanent or temporary changes to your skin, such as some tattoos, can also impact heart rate sensor performance. The ink, pattern, and saturation of some tattoos can block light from the sensor, making it difficult to get reliable readings,' Apple wrote on the device’s product support page.
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+ - Apple, IBM To Bring iPads to 5 Million Elderly Japanese->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett writes: An initiative between Apple, IBM and Japan Post Holdings could put iPads in the hands of up to 5 million members of Japan’s elderly population. The iPads, which will run custom apps from IBM, will supplement Japan Post's Watch Over service where, for a monthly fee, postal employees check on elderly residents and relay information on their well-being to family members.
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+ - Tech Credited With Reducing Nigerian Election Death Toll->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh writes: Dozens died in the runup to Nigeria's most recent election — a shocking statistic to many Westerners, but a relief in comparison to the much more serious violence that plagued earlier elections. Observers are crediting technology with making the election safer: the use of biometric IDs gave voters more confidence in the results, and social media gave people a chance to blow of anger that might've otherwise results in street brawls.
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+ - Disney replaces longtime IT staff with H-1B workers->

Submitted by Lucas123
Lucas123 writes: Disney CEO Bob Iger is one of eight co-chairs of the Partnership for a New American Economy, a leading group advocating for an increase in the H-1B visa cap. Last Friday, the partnership was a sponsor of an H-1B briefing at the U.S. Capitol for congressional staffers. The briefing was closed to the press. One of the briefing documents obtained after the meeting stated, "H-1B workers complement — instead of displace — U.S. Workers." Last October, however, Disney laid off at least 135 IT staff (though employees say it was hundreds more), many of them longtime workers. Disney then replaced them with H-1B contractors that company said could better "focus on future innovation and new capabilities." The fired workers believe the primary motivation behind Disney's action was cost-cutting. "Some of these folks were literally flown in the day before to take over the exact same job I was doing," one former employee said. Disney officials promised new job opportunities as a result of the restructuring, but the former staff interviewed by Computerworld said they knew of few co-workers who had landed one of the new jobs. Use of visa workers in a layoff is a public policy issue, particularly for Disney. Ten U.S. senators are currently seeking a federal investigation into displacement of IT workers by H-1B-using contractors. Kim Berry, president of the Programmer's Guild, said Congress should protect American workers by mandating that positions can only be filled by H-1B workers when no qualified American — at any wage — can be found to fill the position."
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+ - Ham Radio Fills Communication Gaps in Nepal Rescue Effort->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett writes: Amateur radio has stepped in to fill communication gaps in Nepal, which is struggling with power outages and a flaky Internet after a devastating earthquake on Saturday killed over 5,000 people. Though 99 persons have ham licenses in Kathmandu, about eight use high-frequency (HF) radios that can transmit long distances, while another 30 have very high frequency and ultra high frequency sets for local traffic, said Satish Kharel, a lawyer in Kathmandu, who uses the ham call signal 9N1AA. The hobbyist radio operators are working round-the-clock to help people get in touch with relatives, pass on information and alert about developing crises.
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+ - jQuery Creator Annotates His Original Source Code->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett writes: Earlier this month, jQuery creator John Resig annotated one of the earliest existing versions of jQuery, which was first released on January 24, 2005 at BarCamp NYC. Resig’s comments provide a number of interesting historical and technical notes about the early code, including this gem about the value of braces: 'I really dis-liked having unnecessary braces. This unfortunate style preference plagued us for quite a while and caused all sorts of avoidable logic errors. I like braces now, I think they provide extra clarity and help to prevent common mistakes.
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Beware of bugs in the above code; I have only proved it correct, not tried it. -- Donald Knuth

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