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Comment Re:Translated (Score 5, Informative) 451

Even if you lock them up hard (which is easy to do when on glare ice) the traction control system still detects that the wheels have stopped.
Some systems used initertial sensors, but it was found that drivers will steer during a skid, and this fact can be used by the computer that it is in a 4 wheel skid.

Modern electronic stability control systems are an evolution of the ABS concept. Here, a minimum of two additional sensors are added to help the system work: these are a steering wheel angle sensor, and a gyroscopic sensor. The theory of operation is simple: when the gyroscopic sensor detects that the direction taken by the car does not coincide with what the steering wheel sensor reports, the ESC software will brake the necessary individual wheel(s) (up to three with the most sophisticated systems), so that the vehicle goes the way the driver intends.

Comment Re:Translated (Score 5, Insightful) 451

You mean that automakers are allowing the police to stop people's vehicles at any time for any reason, remotely.

Oh come off it.

This technology is already in lots and lots of cars, its being advertised heavily by at least a half dozen car companies, from Subaru all the way up to Mercedes.
When have you ever seen police stop anybody electronically?

The technology has been proven for years in options packages or standard equipment on higher priced cars, and these days on mid priced cars.
I've had it since 2012, and it has never once false alarmed and applied brakes inappropriately. It can detect and warn me of slower traffic AHEAD of the car in front of me, even when the car ahead has not yet realized it is approaching a crash.

I'm embarrassed to admit It has braked the car at least a couple times for me when I was distracted.

Comment Re:Looking at a bridge from space is somehow bette (Score 2) 36

Yes. But that would be more expensive than just installing GPS receivers on key structural components.

But you see, that is exactly what they did:

The team fixed highly sensitive satnav receivers for detecting movements as small as 1 cm at key locations on the Forth Road Bridge in Scotland.

So they just gather routine movements of the bridge, and send them electronically. If they ever start moving beyond the historical envelop they send someone to inspect. By that time the failure process is well underway.

Comment Re:Not convinced (Score 1) 408

Apparently not as bad as you think.
According to the NTSB stats, there should only be 0.3 accidents of this type per 100,000 miles driven by humans.

These google cars had 3, in 140,000 miles.

Some they blame on the driver. Big deal! ALL of the accidents the NTSB reports are driver accidents.
The inescapable conclusion is that, for what ever reason, these cars are fender bender prone.

I was playing poker the other night... with Tarot cards. I got a full house and 4 people died. -- Steven Wright