Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Misleading Summary; Less than exhaustive resear (Score 1) 459

by iamhigh (#46402627) Attached to: Low-Protein Diet May Extend Lifespan
And nobody knows anyways. Eggs are bad one decade and good the next. Carbs, Protein, HFCS, Red Dye #5, Gluten, etc., and on, and on....

You are, in all likelihood, going to survive at least 50 years, and less than 80. Fuck it. Eat what you want. Look like what you want. Smoke dope. Have fun.

Comment: Outlook 2013 Mail Tips (Score 1) 129

by iamhigh (#46313211) Attached to: Gmail's 'Unsubscribe' Tool Comes Out of the Weeds
Outlook 2013 has a pretty neat feature that I think is part of what they call Mail Tips.

It basically gives you little "apps" that parse the email for certain item and give you options based on the text. Unsubscribe links (gives options, but I haven't clicked), dates (sucks at being useful), action items (barely useful), and I think addresses (haven't tried).

Maybe this feature forced google to go ahead and release it for Gmail. I hope the gmail implementation of dates and action items is better than the Outlook implementation.

Comment: Re:Dreaming of code? (Score 1) 533

by iamhigh (#46123693) Attached to: The Moderately Enthusiastic Programmer
And only 2 of his 6 items listed equate directly to more money for the employee. They represented the following:

Bonuses = Money, Recognition Salary = Money Good Benefits = Security, Money?, Appreciation, Recognition and maybe more Reasonable Metrics = Don't treat us like slaves, Don't treat me like a kid, Treat me like an adult who is trying to make you money so you pay me money Pizza during Meetings = Cool Bosses, Relaxed Atmosphere, Not Cheap Bastards Holiday Parties = Cool Bosses, Relaxed Atmosphere, Not Cheap Bastards

So again, only two are directly related to money. Benefits does indirectly equal more money, but most studies and such do not equate it to salary/bonus. Investment/belief in the product is another factor, but there are many people that work for companies and barely understand the product as it is not relevant to their daily duties. An internal helpdesk position would be a fine example. In fact the helpdesk guy cares more about the internal service they are providing as that is their "product". Using that example, it might be hard to justify giving up a well paying job with a stable company just because they released a crappy java application.

The reality is that there are many concerns when evaluating one's job: friends at work, social setting, management (direct and upper), money, benefits, location, product, job title, company "coolness" (thinking back when I thought I was cool because I worked at the buckle), and so many other intangibles. There is too much to try to break it down... this is really one of those things that even I, as a self-proclaimed lover of any type of systematic process, have learned is judged best by gut.

If you have been dreading a major portion of your job for more than 2 months, then it's time to move on.

Comment: Re:Remember MCSE Bootcamps? (Score 2) 374

by iamhigh (#46122679) Attached to: California Regulator Seeks To Shut Down 'Learn To Code' Bootcamps
As another /.er stated recently, do you realized how many courts would be needed for this libertarian ideal? The government would be just as big as it is now, therefore requiring just as much money and therefore wielding just as much power. But they would all be judges... you know those "activist" judges that right-wingers (cousins of the libertarians) always complaint about.

Not only that, it would make it so that the poor guy trying to find a job to support his family has to sue the company that took his last few thousand out of the account. The rich would have such a major advantage in this "take everyone to court" society you dream of...

Comment: More "graphic material" needed? (Score 2) 277

by iamhigh (#45196693) Attached to: Facebook Lets Beheading Clips Return To Its Site
Sometimes I wonder if the lack of "graphic material" has caused a dissonance from death. As a young kid my father killed pigs so they could eat (or at least watched it). He saw them get sick and die. Several family members died unexpectedly in his youth. He had real life experience with death.

Granted, I never did any of that as I didn't grow up on a farm, nor did I experience unexpected family deaths, and I came out pretty normal. Maybe it takes two generations. Even those in richer families 100 years ago were much more exposed to death than the average kid is now.

One of you psych grads now working in IT, does that make any sense?

Comment: Re:More signs of strain on NHS (Score 1) 634

by iamhigh (#45176953) Attached to: British NHS May Soon No Longer Offer Free Care
Either this is complete bullshit or you guys have bigger issues than healthcare... because, you know, running water is pretty damn basic to a society. From your dehydration link:

At Stafford Hospital – where up to 1,200 patients died needlessly – there were numerous reports of desperate patients resorting to drinking from flower vases because they were so thirsty.

If you don't have sinks that work, you need plumbers, not doctors. Also it seems this is a sensationalist headline (no way!) as these are from kidney failure, of which dehydration is a symptom.

Time is nature's way of making sure that everything doesn't happen at once. Space is nature's way of making sure that everything doesn't happen to you.

Working...