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Comment: Re:OpenMeetings (Score 2) 105

by i.r.id10t (#49154703) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Whiteboard Substitutes For Distributed Teams?

Similar is Big Blue Button (a google summer of code project) - whiteboard functionality, upload files and do the "john madden football commentator thing" to them, voice and cam sharing, ability to mute, etc. And can be set up to record meetings/conferences/etc. Tested it a while back stand-along on a linode that would be $10/mo now (it was a $20/mo plan then), and it was enough to support 15 users at once as long as they all weren't connected via the same wireless link to the LAN to get out to the World

Comment: Re:disclosure (Score 4, Insightful) 438

by i.r.id10t (#49103757) Attached to: How One Climate-Change Skeptic Has Profited From Corporate Interests

"Here's 1.2 mil. We want you to tell us that it is possible that global warming is being caused by the sun"

A few months of well funded but blindly done research - ie, you know the answer to the question, what can we do to prove it? - and wallah! A paper. That is then submitted to a supposedly peer-reviewed journal, where of course no such review takes place (there have been several stories about that on /.).

So... are we shocked that the NRG Industry went shopping for the answer they wanted to hear? Are we shocked that a person who either needs to be top in their field or at least bringing in grants accepted a grant to do research? Are we shocked that a peer-reviewed journal is in fact not very often reviewd by the peers?

Comment: Re:The FSF has failed (Score 1) 201

by i.r.id10t (#49084767) Attached to: After 30 Years of the Free Software Foundation, Where Do We Stand?

There needs to be a copyleft licence that restricts distribution on the same medium as non-free software, without it we will lose the IoT as well.

That point is addressed in the Free Software Definition and any license containing said clause would not be considered Free.

Comment: Re:Reminds me of the old days (Score 2) 69

by i.r.id10t (#49084747) Attached to: Will Every Xbox Be a Dev Kit?

Some of the games for the Odyssey2 console -http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnavox_Odyssey%C2%B2 - had some (extremely) limited programmability to them. I remember making my own maps on the pac man clone, and programming in their flavor of basic which was different from the basic I knew from the TRS-80 series and hand no real way to save your programs

Comment: Re:Pointless (Score 1) 754

by i.r.id10t (#49063045) Attached to: Removing Libsystemd0 From a Live-running Debian System

I've never had an issue with a laptop that I've selected running Linux sine the later 2.2 kernels.

Either when buying new for work I've just bought the Dell business line and made sure the wireless was supported (just pick the Intel offering) and no issues.

For personal use I've either been given stuff - again, Dells for the most part - or bought cheap at a pawn shop. Before taking or buying, I just boot with a LiveCD and make sure it all works. Knoppix became available when? Do you remember the NT Hardware Compatability List? And how you could use the NT 4.0 CD to make 2 disks that would interrogate the hardware and tell you what was supported and what wasn't? I've seen poorly maintained lists of various hardware support, but they were never really useful for me. The LiveCD trick though *anyone* can do, and I'd recommend doing as a hardware function test on a used machine even if you are planning to run Windows on it.

Comment: Re:why is this even a thing??? (Score 2) 31

by i.r.id10t (#49058457) Attached to: West Point and Marines Launch Open Cyber Conflict Journal

But there are things that need to be communicated between separate entities, and while it may not be War Games incarnate, I can see how malicious disruption of some things like scheduled bank transfers, etc. could cause some panic and mayhem. Think of it as the newest layer of SIGINT

Comment: Re:By Statesman's cape! (Score 2) 157

by i.r.id10t (#49026623) Attached to: DMCA Exemption Campaign Would Let Fans Run Abandoned Games

"Nope, sorry, we needed the disk space and bandwidth for $other_thing, it was deleted over a year ago. Developer machines and such were all replaced twice since the last checkout/build and we're not even sure we can get it to compile for $os anymore due to outdated libs and such.

Here's a coupon good for free shipping for any downloadable content for $suckiest_game_ever that you purchase in the next 42 minutes. Now go away."

Comment: Re:Makes sense (Score 1) 116

by i.r.id10t (#48987897) Attached to: TP-82: The Gun Cosmonauts Carried On Space Missions

You realize that the delayed rollerblock blowback design of the HK 91/93/94/MP5 is just a copy of that from the G3, which was licensed from Spain? And the only reason the Germans did that is that FN in Belgium refused them a license to build their own FN-FALs for some reason (G1 series as issued to German forces, the German Boarder Guard, etc). No German engineering involved...

Comment: Re:Makes sense (Score 1) 116

by i.r.id10t (#48986771) Attached to: TP-82: The Gun Cosmonauts Carried On Space Missions

Same round the AK-74 uses, similar to the 5.56x45 NATO stuff the M16 uses.

Unfortunately while its velocity will be OK (2800fps or so) there isn't a lot of mass to help push through and penetrate something like a big ass bear.

Now the 32 gauge shotgun, that is real close to 1/2", a "pure" lead round ball would weigh half an ounce... A 350 grain 416 caliber Barnes solid bullet (meant for the 416 rigby - a classic Dangerous Game round) in a sabot, being pushed to about 2000fps would do the job though... assuming the action strength was there.

Comment: American version (sorta) (Score 3, Informative) 116

by i.r.id10t (#48983257) Attached to: TP-82: The Gun Cosmonauts Carried On Space Missions

The American pilot version - cut down bolt action in 22 Hornet. Since it has a barrel less than 16" and an OAL of less than 26" it falls under NFA purview, so there is a tax stamp associated (and several months wait).

http://www.gunbroker.com/Aucti...

The other "more common" but still rare is the M6 version which is 22 hornet over a 410 shotgun on a weird skeleton style stock and weirder firing mechanism

http://www.gunbroker.com/Aucti...

According to all the latest reports, there was no truth in any of the earlier reports.

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