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Comment: Jealousy talking (Score 2) 262

by iamacat (#47422083) Attached to: Dubai's Climate-Controlled Dome City Is a Dystopia Waiting To Happen

Everyone will be free to visit - like Manhattan or San Francisco or countless other desirable places in the world. Most will not be able to afford to live there - again like all of these places. Cost of housing will probably subsidize construction that couldn't sustain itself just on visitors. By all signs, they are trying to keep out desert heat and not their own people. If I lived in this kind of climate, I would love a place to cool down for a couple of hours. I think people just feel jealous that we don't make this kind of projects in United States.

Comment: Java, Python, Lisp... (Score 1) 177

by iamacat (#47421173) Attached to: Will Google's Dart Language Replace Javascript? (Video)

There should be no languages for "web development", only languages for quality development, with web being application delivery mechanism. Current dichotomy leads to loss of features and quality that was taken for granted decades ago.

I should be able to tell a webmail site to cache all e-mails locally and then have full access to attachments and instant full body search while offline. This requires multithreading, fast access to large binary files, precompilation and static typing for performance. Javascript is just not going to cut it. Maybe Dart would be allright, but good luck getting experienced developers and ready to use software packages. This particular task likely needs a full blown database.

Developers should be able to choose a language based on the problem they are trying to solve, not how the application will be delivered to the user.

Comment: Re:Encryption in the hands of a layperson (Score 1) 115

by iamacat (#47389747) Attached to: Use of Encryption Foiled the Cops a Record 9 Times In 2013

Just cold, hard facts my friend. A gun will not make you or your family safer without police-grade training repeated on regular basis. As much as it appeals to your ego to think you are the next Rembo, all objective studies have found that adults are not able to effectively take out a gunman without endangering themselves and bystanders. And kids don't stay away from guns no matter what safety classes they attend.

Comment: Re:As soon as you can start your own business (Score 1) 279

by iamacat (#47389711) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Often Should You Change Jobs?

I consider myself very sharp, but I have no illusions of my potential independent business generating as much money in general or for myself as my current team. Well known individual and corporate content creators wouldn't even bother to talk to me without me having a track record or resources of our business. If you have a truly groundbreaking vision AND personal charisma AND financial security if not ability to make large personal investments, things could be different. Or you can win a lottery with smaller scale but high quality business like WhatsApp. But for most people, collective work brings better dividends and more pleasant lifestyle than striking it out on your own.

Comment: Never, in a big company with a good culture (Score 1) 279

by iamacat (#47389643) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Often Should You Change Jobs?

Chances are you can learn new skills and even move into new functional areas without going outside. It takes perhaps a year to prove yourself and perhaps another 2-3 years to find a project you really like and become an expert in it. At this point, you can make big contributions and resolve problems quickly without working really long hours. Big companies offer long vacations, sabbatical leaves and other official and unofficial perks to retain experienced contributors.

The only catch is to recognized when your company is going sour and don't hesitate to switch then. I have worked in a great company for 10 years, than stuck for perhaps 3 more years longer than I should when it became stagnant and impersonal. Then, after an awful 18 month stunt in supposedly #1 company that turned out to be terrible internally, I joined another with with great culture and plan to stay there indefinitely. It inspires me that one of my best coworkers is 65 years old and lives in senior housing while still having great fun at work.

So it depends, but jumping just because of time is not wise. You may get a raise, but lose all the long timer perks and connections that you made inside.

Comment: Encryption in the hands of a layperson (Score 1) 115

by iamacat (#47381003) Attached to: Use of Encryption Foiled the Cops a Record 9 Times In 2013

Is like a gun of an average NRA nut - totally useless for security, while advertising to the whole world that you want to get in trouble. These encrypted files on your hard drive have been transmitted over online services and shared with other people. It's far more convenient for police to get a warrant for online data and lean on those people than tinker with your computer. On the other hand, discovery of encrypted files that you are not willing to open is an excellent clue that getting these warrants and harassing your friends is a good use of police time.

Now, when it comes to passwords, your cipher might be 64 bit, but the space of words and phrases that an average person is able to remember is much smaller. Chances are, yours can be cracked with a map reduce task running on Amazon public cloud, for a small fraction of a budget DAs would allocate for a major case. If not, it's just back to harassing your friends and family. And it's not likely you personally are trained to withstand experienced interrogators and fitted with a dental filling cyanide capsule to swallow once you have reached your limit.

Most of those 9 cases probably came from lame police departments that just were not equipped/talented enough to do old fashioned honest investigate works. At the same time, thousands of criminals have evaded capture through old fashioned guile and ingenuity. If you want to evade authorities, for good or evil reasons, it's best to stick to simple things. An iPad hidden under a neighbors door rug is more likely to evade detection than an encrypted one in your house.

Comment: That statistic can't possibly be valid (Score 5, Insightful) 191

nearly 30% of Americans either aren't digitally literate or don't trust the Internet

For that to be true, over 70% of Americans must be BOTH digitally literate AND trust the Internet, which is impossible since anyone who trusts the Internet is not digitally literate.

If this is timesharing, give me my share right now.

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