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Comment: Re:Silicon Valley is overrated (Score 1) 262

by gordo3000 (#47718553) Attached to: Silicon Valley Doesn't Have an Attitude Problem, OK?

momentum? I have family in tech, and 2 are in San Jose, 1 in New Jersey, and another in Atlanta (a fourth left the industry).

From what it looks like there, they ended up where they are by momentum and job opportunities. Once you have a couple kids and your life is settled, sure moving to another city is in theory ok, but it can be hard if you have a house, schools, etc. It seems moves from one city to another were mainly dominated by loss of job and no options in the local area for that skill set at the time.

I think it's like asking why are investment banks and trading floors located in NYC. It is patently absurd when you could locate in Florida or Texas with much lower taxes, lower costs, etc and almost all the work is done on computer over the internet. But 150 years of momentum (from the days when stock broking was the job and working on an exchange meant something about location) the last 15 haven't seen large scale exodus.

Comment: Re:SF Rents (Score 1) 262

by gordo3000 (#47692495) Attached to: Silicon Valley Doesn't Have an Attitude Problem, OK?

the real kicker is that these people are well off by any measure. you are talking about 6 figure household income folks getting pushed out, not the minimum wage worker at McDonalds (or whatever fast food joint is popular in SF). People need to think a bit, no one working and earning as much as these tech guys are search out neighborhoods where the household income is 20k. It's upper middle class white folks getting displaced.

Comment: Re: Tech workers in Silicon Valley (Score 1) 262

by gordo3000 (#47673935) Attached to: Silicon Valley Doesn't Have an Attitude Problem, OK?

no, people are mad because they want to bash someone without cause. the city decided to try something to massively reduce traffic and infrastructure burdens by extending bus stops to include these corporate buses. If your use of the stop offered some form of public benefit you probably could convince the city to allow you to use it as well (i.e. it can't just be you wanting to pick up a friend there before you head out to get a beer). Just start a bus service for companies that don't want to run their own in the bay area, get a few contracts and you will probably be offered the same terms as Google and Apple. In fact, there would be a strong argument they must offer you those terms.

Comment: Re:Huh? (Score 1) 406

by gordo3000 (#47641401) Attached to: Idiot Leaves Driver's Seat In Self-Driving Infiniti, On the Highway

really? speed limits in the US are on par with most of Europe and the UK. The exception may be Germany with their lack of speed limits, but most interstates I drove on had the limit at 75 (120 kph, above the UK) and highways are regularly 65 (104 kph). Everyone takes as grace an extra 5 mph (8 kph) so I generally drove the same speed between the UK, France, and the US (and my 1 week in croatia). What areas have higher limits?

Comment: Re:Huh? (Score 1) 406

by gordo3000 (#47641389) Attached to: Idiot Leaves Driver's Seat In Self-Driving Infiniti, On the Highway

your comments on the US seem to be a question of being used to it. In the US you do not make changes to allow for merging cars/cars behind you. And frankly, in the UK, I thought it was ridiculous people would try and do that. instead, you leave enough following distance to allow cars that are entering/changing lanes/what ever, to be able to do it smoothly without you making a change.

This way every driver sees a much more static situation. It also allows for everyone to go faster. My experience in the UK was that people left very little distance because most of the roads were too shitty to allow for much speed (well, too shitty well outside of London and half decent roads around London were either poorly designed (multiple close intersections on a major artery, including 2 only for pedestrians rather than using a raised walkway) or too naturally crowded to matter.

Of course, it doesn't work that way when you get to some cities like Atlanta and in some areas where people hold the left late even when going quite slow (Florida, where I grew up). But then, I've been in the UK and France and stuck in exactly the same situation. The best at times has been Japan, though speed limits here are super low, so everyone goes much faster than legal and every once in a while you get a stupid ticket because you were unlucky.

Comment: Re:Picture in my head was better (Score 1) 406

by gordo3000 (#47619803) Attached to: Idiot Leaves Driver's Seat In Self-Driving Infiniti, On the Highway

not that hard, have a friend drive in front of you at 15 miles an hour (or even slower if the car has good enough adaptive cruise control) and deal with the discomfort of jumping out of the car (unfortunately, probably the window so the door isn't swinging along open)

Comment: Re:not suprising... (Score 1) 406

by gordo3000 (#47619789) Attached to: Idiot Leaves Driver's Seat In Self-Driving Infiniti, On the Highway

there is a weird hybrid in the maxima, but otherwise the nissan infiniti cars all come from the high end JDM Nissans.

When I was looking at cars (living in Japan) the equivalents were:
Fuga --> M series
Skyline --> G series or Q series now
cima --> higher ended infiniti, but they don't sell either anymore.

The problem is hte JDM nissans for "regular" folks weren't ported exactly so it makes comparisons a little off.

Comment: Re:Huh? (Score 1) 406

by gordo3000 (#47619665) Attached to: Idiot Leaves Driver's Seat In Self-Driving Infiniti, On the Highway

autonomous cars won't all fail the same way unless the situation is exactly the same. They are MORE sensitive to minor differences because they can actually comprehend all the minor differences. That isn't to say they won't do something incredibly stupid at some point, but you may want to learn a bit about how those systems work. And of course, the software won't be the same on every car.

But I like your dig about American drivers. After spending my last year driving in the UK, I found the drivers there spectacularly bad. If they are better than Aussies, I'm glad I've never had to drive in Sydney. But my first few weeks I wasn't exactly a daisy, the roundabouts really screw with you if you have never taken them before (especially on the dual carriageways).

Then again, it could be as simple the driving standards (i.e. etiquette and culture) are different in each country.

Comment: Re:ap cs tests a joke (Score 1) 119

by gordo3000 (#47546245) Attached to: AP Computer Science Test Takers Up 8,000; Pass Rate Down 6.8%

I've taken tests before and "known" every answer. The score didn't always turn out as I expected because I made silly mistakes by rushing. I'll bet the graders (there are generally 2 for every free response question though there can be 3 if there is argument as to the merit of a score, and it is scored in a blind fashion to what other graders see) knew the material better than you, and frankly you got the answers not right enough.

that you screwed up that day doesn't make the test invalid. It really just means you screwed up that day and didn't (I don't know you so this may not be true) perform at the top of your ability level.

Comment: Re:Inconceivable! (Score 1) 119

by gordo3000 (#47541295) Attached to: AP Computer Science Test Takers Up 8,000; Pass Rate Down 6.8%

actually, my first thought when I saw the stats was "isn't that about a 30% pass rate for the "new" students"? It turns out it's about a 35% pass rate. Though I don't know what the variability is in pass rates from year to year so it's a pretty meaningless calculation.

The real win is we are getting more people to TRY. Not everyone has to succeed, but it's sad that everyone gets a chance to play basketball in school and we feel that is somehow a relevant experience but we cringe at throwing a little money at giving more kids a chance to experience computer programming. I mean, how do you even know you have an interest if you are never exposed?

Comment: Re:Damn I used to like southwest (Score 1) 928

I think the biggest difference is your wife was with you. There is, culturally, a huge difference between separating a 6 year old from the only parent and separating a wife and husband, and reasonably so. I almost never fly southwest, so I didn't realize they don't have a "Young children first" rule like every other airline I've been on.

Comment: Re:name and location tweeted... (Score 1) 928

so what you are saying is millions and millions of years of evolution have conditioned us to be a male dominated society, and in fact evolutionary forces have probably perfected the social structure that best secures our species' future, and women's rights is basically unnatural.

got it. at least now I can reply the reason I'm against equal rights is it is unnatural and has no basis on a fundamental level....

If I'd known computer science was going to be like this, I'd never have given up being a rock 'n' roll star. -- G. Hirst

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