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Comment: Freedom is important in its own right. (Score 1) 219

by jbn-o (#49787299) Attached to: Adblock Plus Victorious Again In Court

People should keep that in mind when they argue for non-free browsers over Free Software browsers such as Firefox, GNU IceCat, and others. Being free to control your Internet experience is critical, being free to decide what you want to take in is never totally in your hands when you run non-free (proprietary, user-subjugating) software. The proprietor always has the upper hand even if they don't use that power right away or in ways you don't see or understand.

Comment: Re:Corporate media doesn't act in public's interes (Score 1) 113

by jbn-o (#49772449) Attached to: Privacy Behaviors Changed Little After Snowden

What you call "the slow way" is called journalism. Journalism, like scientific work or any other work worth doing, takes time to do. There are plenty of examples of independent journalism being done well, some have already been shared in this thread by others. Here are some more that come to mind: Democracy Now!, NOW with Bill Moyers and Bill Moyers Journal were both quite well done and worth watching reruns/archives (moreso the Journal), CounterPunch, Harry Shearer's weekly Le Show, and The Real News. All of these focus on issues of importance, get more deeply into those issues via interviews with those who have studied the topic in-depth via investigative journalism and those who work in the field, and leave you with pointers to more information you can study yourself. I'm sure there are so many more examples of this work being done well I didn't list but don't let that stop you from trying various sources and reading books (paper books, not DRM'd proprietary-driven computer-based readers that track you, threaten to cut off your reading, or deny you the other freedoms paper grants). You won't agree with everything you see, hear, and read but the point isn't to manufacture your consent, it's to get you thinking critically about the world outside the allowable limits of debate so often featured in mainstream coverage.

Comment: Corporate media doesn't act in public's interest (Score 1) 113

by jbn-o (#49769675) Attached to: Privacy Behaviors Changed Little After Snowden

But the corporate media (including repeaters like /.) are designed to hew closely to the "firehose" reportage which includes drawing conclusions quickly so people stay focused on what's coming next, and anything undesirable that somehow gets reported doesn't stick around in the reported consciousness for long. This is inherently incompatible with real life where, as you say, real change takes far longer to be seen. Adherents to the firehose approach implicitly say their take is a good thing (obviously few would argue they're actively promoting something bad) despite the foreseeable adverse impact on the public's welfare.

Comment: Comparing proprietors is not freedom. (Score 1) 529

by jbn-o (#49752087) Attached to: Ads Based On Browsing History Are Coming To All Firefox Users

So you're switching away from a browser that is still Free Software (which provides the ultimate configurability), the basis of variants (GNU IceCat, for example) that make it more convenient to respect your software freedom by only showing you Free addons by default, for a proprietary browser. And then you're getting lost in the weeds by debating the purported merits of one proprietor over another (Google vs. Opera) where you know so little about both such comparisons pale to what you give up by choosing any proprietary software.

I'd rather keep my software freedom, run more Free Software, and enjoy the wide variety of Free Software addons to help me keep browser privacy (NoScript, Priv3+, disabling Javascript-based clipboard manipulations, browser ID spoofing, and so on).

Comment: Re:Brainteasers and Interviews (Score 1) 493

by petsounds (#49741433) Attached to: The Brainteaser Elon Musk Asks New SpaceX Engineers

being able to answer it indicates not that you are smart, but that you have a certain kind of background that leads you to have been exposed to such things.

This is exactly what is wrong with software hiring, popularized in recent years by Google and thus spread throughout tech startups everywhere. You are applying inherent bias to your candidate list and self-limiting the kinds of people that could add value to the company. In other words, your hiring process will collect many people who think inside the box you want them to think in, and reject every person who thinks outside of that box. That is dangerous for both a company's intellectual and cultural health.

Comment: Le Show and The Big Uneasy are both excellent (Score 5, Interesting) 214

by jbn-o (#49693881) Attached to: Harry Shearer Walks Away From "The Simpsons," and $14 Million

By which you're referring to "Le Show" which covers items in the news and his very well researched documentary "The Big Uneasy" which shows how the Army Corps of Engineers made Hurricane Katrina far worse than it would have been and evades responsibility throughout. Speaking of showing, Shearer backs up his points by quoting and interviewing experts in the relevant fields of discussion and by quoting published hypocrisy from those in power. That's far more backing for his points than I see you giving your views which purport to know what he thinks. In short, you apparently don't think he's funny or insightful but "without actual good context" for anyone to see your views as anything but a name-calling accusation.

Comment: Digital Restrictions hand in hand with Open Source (Score 1) 371

by jbn-o (#49678331) Attached to: Firefox 38 Arrives With DRM Required To Watch Netflix

Quite right about how Digital "Rights" Management is a propaganda term designed to frame the issue as though it's okay to take user/reader rights away from them in the switch from one means of seeing media to another. But Mozilla has always framed its work as "open source". So one should expect with "open"ness -- the open source movement is, as Brad Kuhn pointed out recently, the greenwashing movement it was defined to be. The Free Software Foundation has long pointed out how "open source" differs from "free software" (older essay, younger essay). The younger open source movement accepts proprietary software and the older free software movement does not because open source was defined as a proprietor-friendly response to the user freedom-seeking social movement.

Comment: People should not buy into amoral marketplace (Score 1) 612

by jbn-o (#49660675) Attached to: FWD.us To Laid-Off Southern California Edison Workers: Boo-Hoo

I think slavery is a part of the market and this reality is why one can't afford to frame issues in the amoral terms of the marketplace. Looking out for one's own interests necessarily includes building a society that provides for all and defends against exploitations many forms. It's high time we seriously build rules that place a barrier underneath us all the theme of which says 'society won't let you become more destitute than this' and then specifies in detail what that level is.

"Floggings will continue until morale improves." -- anonymous flyer being distributed at Exxon USA

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