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Comment: Re:It's still his parts collection, regardless. So (Score 1) 3

by digitalunity (#48043977) Attached to: Whose car is it? Bricked Model S a no go unless Tesla says so.

It's sort of unclear from the article how the ECU was disabled. Was it damaged during the crash or did the insurance company disable it when they sold the car?

In any case, it seems to me he has some recourse against the seller of the vehicle. On the other hand, the laws should address this scenario. California law already strongly protects consumers from insurance forcing shops to use second-rate parts. If that is a good idea, and I think it is, we should have some requirement that also forces manufacturers to make replacement parts available under non-discriminatory terms to consumers, parts stores and anyone else who wants them.

It's not for Tesla to decide what car is roadworthy. This was a business decision and Tesla knows it. It has nothing to do with actual liability and more to do with their stock price every time a Tesla driver goes off the road and t-bones a minivan.

Comment: Re:wtf (Score 1) 185

by digitalunity (#39865103) Attached to: At my place of employ, we track business data ...

I'll come out of hiding for this one.

First, polls aren't scientific. It's in the FAQ. Anyone doing market research with Slashdot polls is higher than a kite.

Second, many businesses depend heavily on off the shelf solutions to strategic business problems. Until I created forecasting software for my company, we depended on Excel reports heavily with mixed results. So maybe it doesn't seem "high tech" to you, but this poll is far more relevant to most readers than asking who is on TDMA, CDMA or WCDMA networks or whatever bullshit you'd find more interesting.

Comment: Re:Uh, no (Score 2) 815

by digitalunity (#34988662) Attached to: Italian Scientists Demonstrate Cold Fusion?

I'm immediately skeptical because he says no hydrogen is consumed in the process. Is the hydrogen a catalyst only? And if he found a way to produce fusion with no secondary radiation production, this would be all over the news all over the world.

The equation must balance and this just doesn't seem plausible.

Comment: Re:.NET Windows Forms (Score 1) 331

by digitalunity (#34374170) Attached to: What 2D GUI Foundation Do You Use?

It sounds like you don't know any better lol.

Winforms has a nice API, but there are a lot of drawbacks to it. Essentially it is a wrapper for WIN32 GDI and that brings in a lot of limitations. Microsoft made a poor decision in choosing to not reimplement controls in Winforms because they would have very quickly been able to add a lot of flexibility and features that are missing from other frameworks like Qt.

Comment: Re:Seconded. (Score 1) 331

by digitalunity (#34374118) Attached to: What 2D GUI Foundation Do You Use?

You'll quickly run into huge problems depending on which controls you try to subclass.

Try subclassing a rich text control to add syntax highlighting without using WPF. It can be done, but it is a HUGE pain in the ass. You'll need anger management therapy when you're done.

Winforms, for all its API sanity and OO goodness, is still just a fancy wrapper for WIN32 GDI - including all the gotchas. If they want me to take it seriously, they need to reimplement these "problem controls" either in the standard GDI library or reimplement them in Winforms.

Comment: Re:Go for it (Score 1) 1065

by digitalunity (#34278606) Attached to: US May Disable All Car Phones, Says Trans. Secretary

I called 911 on a drunk driver a couple months ago. He was drifting over the centerline a few feet and would always over-correct.

Certainly it could have been a distracted driver, drunk, tired, high, heart attack, whatever. Doesn't really matter why because he shouldn't have been on the road, no matter what the cause was. I saw in the newspaper later that he did in fact get charged with DWI instead of DUI but no BAC was listed, so it likely was just medication or something. Regardless, head on collisions at 55+ MPH are no joke. There's a reason crash test ratings are done at 40 MPH. Faster and it's anybodies guess what happens.

Comment: Re:To all those who saw no harm in the Sun purchas (Score 1) 675

by digitalunity (#34050646) Attached to: Oracle Claims Google 'Directly Copied' Our Java Code

Investors wanted their money back. If Sun dumped all their copyrighted works onto torrent networks with a GPL license and folded up shop, their stock price would have instantly tanked and investors lost every penny.

Such a leadership decision would have been so negligent with regards to fiduciary responsibility that the board likely would have faced personal criminal liability. Not to mention, anyone working at Sun who actually wanted to stay at the company would have lost their jobs.

It's easy to see the repercussions of the Sun sale affecting us all for years to come, but I don't think there was any other choice. Oracle was the last company I wanted to see get Sun's assets; but it is what is is.

Comment: Re:Here we go again (SCO) (Score 4, Insightful) 675

by digitalunity (#34050492) Attached to: Oracle Claims Google 'Directly Copied' Our Java Code

Oracle isn't going anywhere. This lawsuit isn't going to be anything at all like SCO/IBM or SCO/Novell because Oracle is many times larger than SCO is and is at least 2 orders of magnitude more relevant.

Java is everywhere. Schools teach it. Companies use it.

If Google really copied things from the Java source like actual source code or documentation, they might be screwed. It sounds like from the summary that the bulk of this 'copying' was the API, which I don't think is even eligible for copyright(not artistic).

Comment: Re:I know why.. lack of standardization (Score 1) 535

by digitalunity (#33899722) Attached to: Huge Shocker — 3D TVs Not Selling

I bought a new monitor for better contrast and energy savings. I think the viewsonic used like 300 watts or something and weighed 70 pounds. It got so warm my cat would sleep on it in the winter.

I miss the high resolution, but the LCD has excellent contrast and is very compact in comparison.

Comment: Re:I know why.. lack of standardization (Score 2, Insightful) 535

by digitalunity (#33894540) Attached to: Huge Shocker — 3D TVs Not Selling

You've got it all wrong.

HD isn't "High Definition", it's "Higher Definition". That is to say that it is higher definition than the really abysmal NTSC specification called out.

On another note, I just got rid of my old 21" Viewsonic CRT. I think it was close to 18 years old and still had higher resolution than my new widescreen LCD monitor.

Any circuit design must contain at least one part which is obsolete, two parts which are unobtainable, and three parts which are still under development.

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