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Comment: Re:Labrea Tarpit doesn't help volumetric attacks (Score 1) 312

by dgallard (#48722829) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Should We Do About the DDoS Problem?

My friend Don Cohen designed PEIP, an extenstion to IP. PEIP stands for Path Enhanced Internet Protocol.

A somewhat dated but accurate explanation and demo can be seen here:

http://www.cs3-inc.com/MANAnet... [cs3-inc.com]

(Watch the Flash Demo at the bottom of the page that illustrates several scenarios.).

Last I checked, CS3, where Don works, was not successful in convincing Cisco to pay attention to this solution.

The basic idea is to modify routers to use PEIP, enabling routers to provide "Fair Service". In other words, since it is impossible to determine which packets are part of DDOS attacks, the PEIP solution instead assures that all paths routing to a target victim receive equal bandwidth. In this way, an attacker (based on the path, not on the source IP) will only receive a fraction of the bandwidth to the target.

Dennis Allard
http://oceanpark.com/ [oceanpark.com]

Comment: PEIP offers a solution for the DDOS problem (Score 1) 312

by dgallard (#48712883) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Should We Do About the DDoS Problem?

(I am never quite sure how to post on Slashdot to assure my post is part of the thread associated with a Slashdot headline. I am trying the "Post" action).

My friend Don Cohen designed PEIP, an extenstion to IP. PEIP stands for Path Enhanced Internet Protocol.

A somewhat dated but accurate explanation and demo can be seen here:

http://www.cs3-inc.com/MANAnet...

(Watch the Flash Demo at the bottom of the page that illustrates several scenarios.).

Last I checked, CS3, where Don works, was not successful in convincing Cisco to pay attention to this solution.

The basic idea is to modify routers to use PEIP, enabling routers to provide "Fair Service". In other words, since it is impossible to determine which packets are part of DDOS attacks, the PEIP solution instead assures that all paths routing to a target victim receive equal bandwidth. In this way, an attacker (based on the path, not on the source IP) will only receive a fraction of the bandwidth to the target.

Dennis Allard
http://oceanpark.com/

Comment: Re:Stupid, trucks cause the problem (Score 1) 554

by dgallard (#48396991) Attached to: The Downside to Low Gas Prices

Ganjadude states:

        "There is no downside to lower gas prices. lower prices on anything is always a positive. "

This is only true in the belief system of Libertarian Fundamentalists.

Libertarian Fundamentalists believe that the "free" market leads to optimal economic solutions.

But that is not true. The free market does lead to lower prices in some sectors and accumulation of wealth by owners of the economy. But that is just one point in a large space of possible economies. For the case in point, lower gas prices and the shale oil boom are having the effect of reducing incentive to produce renewable energy solutions which, ultimately, we will need for the economy to function and to reduce green house gas effects. It is not logically true that subsidies are intrinsically evil as long as they have the effect of remedying unintended consequences of the narrow-minded free market religion.

Also, the main point to this article was that we need to repair our transportation infrastructure and doing so via an inflation-adjusted tax on gas is one possible way to finance those needed repairs.

Comment: Re:So? (Score 1) 488

by dgallard (#48039953) Attached to: Energy Utilities Trying To Stifle Growth of Solar Power

The Libertarian Fundamentalist on this board don't really believe in competition, they obsequiously believe in "free" markets and imagine that the oil companies prosper in a "free" market (which is freer to those with wealth and power).

To quote http://priceofoil.org/fossil-f... :

In the United States, credible estimates of annual fossil fuel subsidies range from $10 billion to $52 billion annually yet these donÃf(TM)t even include costs borne by taxpayers related to the climate, local environmental, and health impacts of the fossil fuel industry.

Comment: Re: Laser Eye Surgery, Revisited 10 Years Later (Score 1) 550

by dgallard (#47558543) Attached to: Laser Eye Surgery, Revisited 10 Years Later

[The slashdot GUI makes it impossible to be sure I am replying to a post or creating a new post. My intention here is to reply to the original post having subject: Laser Eye Surgery, Revisited 10 Years Later]

The reason I don't have Lasik done is because I have bifocals for reading but normally am able to read and see clearly to about 18 inches. My optometrist informed me that after Lasik, my close up vision will be worse. I.e., I am now able to read and see things close to me without corrective lenses. But after Lasik the distance would be decreased substantially and I would need higher power corrective lenses for close up sight. I prefer to be glasses free for close up sight.

Comment: Re: Not, it is NOT impossible ... (Score 1) 580

by dgallard (#44745413) Attached to: Neil deGrasse Tyson Says Private Business Will Not Open the Space Frontier

How lonely it would be on Mars. What a horrible idea.

As for the super-rich going on space roller coaster rides, sure why not. The transfer of wealth upward (which Fundamentalist Libertarians think is natural since "government is bad" and the "free" market is good) is going to make it possible for the upper one tenth or one hundredth per cent to pay for and go on such rides. Maybe they'll notice that the odds of surviving a launch and successful return into space are in only one in a few hundred and decide to spend their money on moats or whatever new form of security systems will be needed in the future to keep the rabble out.

+ - Why does slashdot send news summary to my old email address?->

Submitted by dgallard
dgallard writes: It's bad enough trying to manage multiple email addresses, often necessary due to the inablity for even the likes of Google to allow one to copy an identity to a new identity (more on that someday in some other post but, for starters, just try to move your YouTube account from your old-style Google email identity to your new Google Apps/Sites/Whatever-it's-called identity — no can do).

Mostly, I am using this post to submit a problem report to Slashdot. I am going to disable my old google email identity that I used to use to receive the daily Slashdot news summary. I figured I was not getting it because I had not updated my Slashdot account with my main email address.

Alas, no, I *had* updated it long ago. But the daily Slashdot news summary is still being sent to my old address. I am going to disable that old address now (I keep one spare Google Apps/Sites/Whatever-it's-called email address for purposes such as this when I need to temporarily become an old identity).

My hope is that a slashdot sysadmin will see this posting and start sending the daily news summary to the email address I have registered in my Slashdot profile (and have had registered for quite some time).

Thanks for reading.
Dennis Allard
allard@oceanpark.com

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:A twinge of sadness at this passing (Score 2, Insightful) 273

by dgallard (#32275984) Attached to: Duke To Shut Down Usenet Server

Kjella (173770) wrote:

> The whole concept of usenet is out of date, you can argue
> back and forth about the nntp protocol versus the http
> protocol but today it is far more practical to have one
> group on one server and ...

Where to start...

If you think HTTP can replace NNTP you may as well also
think that HTTP can replace SMTP. I guess some people may
think that, if we can believe Facebook messages will have
any kind of longevity. Gawd.

Newsgroups provide an IETF standard format for providing
time-stamp, author, subject, and referenced predecessor associated
with a posted message body and, nicely, the ability to CC or BCC the
work to email addresses. In addition, NNTP provides the ability
to *remove* a posted article, something that even email has failed
to provide. Finally, owing to how it is implemented, USENET provides
archiving in a way that no single (HTTP) Web site could ever hope
to provide. The day Facebook dies will be the day all messages
in the history of Facebook die with it.

No, NNTP is not "out of date". It is, in fact, the least understood
sleeper protocol on the Internet and it is a shame that it has been
co-opted by "Forums", blogs, Twitter, and Facebook. Not that Twitter
and Facebook do not have virtues, they do. Just community forums
is not one of them, compared with the venerable USENET.

Comment: Re:It's not really that bad (Score 1) 913

by dgallard (#32085970) Attached to: How Bad Is the Gulf Coast Oil Spill?

You are in your mid-twenties and you have it all figured out.

You think that 200,000,000 workers all making individual investment decisions would result in a return on investment and retirement system better than social security. You think the logic of return above real growth + inflation can last forever (it cannot - eventually only some people would have all of the money - do the arithmetic).

You like the crap shoot that the market provides and are OK with a large chunk of those 200,000,000 investors getting screwed every 20 or 30 years?

Social Security is one of the best most stable investment programs ever invented and young Libertarians such as yourself have been complaining about it since I was your age.

My 92 year old mom worked her entire life and saved and the marked F***ked her. Her social security is the one safety net she has. Her social security makes it less on hard on me to provide for her, which I do, btw.

I'll be curious to see what your opinions are when you are 55. I heard your exact same arguments from the Silicon Valley crowed 30 years ago. I was at Berkeley, they were at Stanford. That's funny, public vs private. Social Security was supposed to be broke by now. It isn't. And the only reason it will be is if the illogic of the Libertarian Fundamentalists such as yourself remain in control and the Goldman Sachs and other (overpaid) investment bankers of the world and the U.S. Oligarchy continues to transfer wealth to itself at so ably has done these past 30 years.

Read Les Leopold's book The Looting of America, How Wall Street's Game of Fantasy Finance Destroyed Our Jobs, Pensions, and Prosperity and What We Can Do About It.

Cheers,
Dennis Allard

Comment: Re:PostgreSQL (Score 1) 335

by dgallard (#27412417) Attached to: Locating the Real MySQL

> I doubt that the internally-released version of MySQL on non-windows
> platforms was so amazingly successful that PostgreSQL felt a need to
> copy the name.

I stand corrected (am humbled by the facts, per your sig).

My confusion is partly because I was familiar with Postgres from
the mid-1980s (and with is predecessor Ingres from the early 1980s),
so when it changed names I remember feeling that the venerable
old name had been ruined.

Funny one memory of facts can become corrupted. I should have
checked my facts before spouting off. The rest of my post stands.

Thanks for the history pointers.

NOWPRINT. NOWPRINT. Clemclone, back to the shadows again. - The Firesign Theater

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