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Comment Re:Don't Do IT! (Score 1) 125

You nailed it! I became a programmer because I like programming and I'm good at it. After 25 years of doing it, I'm better than I've ever been. Why would I waste that hard earned skill and experience for spending all day in meetings?

Comment Hall of Fame with Inductees Everyone Agrees On? (Score 1) 277

Doesn't exist. Look at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: Do you agree with all of these? Can you name some that should be there, or perhaps should be there instead?

It looks to me like the first 6 inductees are all games even many non-gamers would have heard of. MY MOM knows about WoW, she's in her 70s and the only video game she has ever played is Words with Friends. I guarantee you that she and most people like her wouldn't know any other MMO.

Comment Metric just isn't obfuscated enough (Score 1) 830

Why use a rational system of measure that's easy to remember and based on something useful when you can instead use a system that was (almost literally) pulled out of someone's ass and is different for every fucking thing you do.

Wait, is it 4 ounces per pint or 12 or some other random number?

I loathe the English system or measure for the same reason I hated most subjects in school aside from math: why memorize random facts when you could just figure them out instead?

Comment Re:No thanks. (Score 1) 95

Ok, it's late.

Both of these have made my ability to control my blood sugars in immeasurable ways.

should be:

Both of these have improved my ability to control my blood sugars in immeasurable ways.

Will Slashdot ever get post editing ability? It's a shame there aren't any geeks here to help make this a reality. ;-)

Comment Re:No thanks. (Score 1) 95

Scott is right, I have been hearing about a cure since 1978. There have been 2 big breakthroughs in that time: the insulin pump and the CGM. Both of these have made my ability to control my blood sugars in immeasurable ways.

What I would really love to know is why I (ok, my insurance) am still paying roughly the same amount for diabetes supplies as I did 30 years ago: test strips (~$1 each, I test 5-8 times/day), pump reservoirs, infusion sets, glucose sensors ($95 for a 6 day sensor) and let's not forget the $5,000 pump that last 5 years on average, so let's say $1k/year. This is an expensive hobby. It's worth every penny to me, and even after insurance, I average $3-4k/year out of pocket. I wonder how someone who make half what I make pays for this.

My guess is that this cost is largely profit for the manufacturers. After 30+ years on the market, the strips are probably 1 penny or less to produce. There's lot of money to be made perpetuating maintenance of diseases.

Comment Re:Insulin Resistance (Score 1) 95

Same here. I have had type 1 diabetes for 37 years and an insulin pump for 29 years. I also use a CGM. My insulin sensitivity hasn't changed in at least 30 years, except temporarily due to other factors, e.g. if I have a cold or some other infection that makes me less sensitive to insulin (once my sugar was out of whack big time for 2 weeks after a cortisone shot in my shoulder)..

My problem is with low blood sugars. I play a lot of sports and the trouble is that this causes my insulin to affect my blood sugar much more than normally and it isn't something a CGM can properly handle yet, especially with the lag. If I play basketball, the 20+ minute lag of a CGM can men that it thinks my blood sugar is 140 when it's really 50 (way too low). In addition, after shooting hoops or lifting weights, my insulin sensitivity can be affected for up to 48 hours after that.

Comment Re:Marketing hype (Score 1) 75

Mine is extremely accurate when I'm at my desk working or sleeping, usually within 1 or 2 points (mg/dL).

The trouble is when I am active. When I play basketball, the lag between blood sugar and the interstitial fluid the CGM monitors can be extreme, like my blood sugar could be 40 when the CGM thinks it's still 120. The other problems is that in cases like this, I'm not sure how fast either insulin or glucagon can be injected. I mean, it's usually easy to deal with if I play moderately intense sports like tennis or racquetball, but full court basketball or weight lifting can lower my sugar so fast, I even don't always get adjusting for it (by lowering my basal rate and eating proteins and carbs ahead and keeping my basal lower for the next 24 hours) right, even after 36 years of practice.

Every cloud has a silver lining; you should have sold it, and bought titanium.