Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: ST:TNG (Score 1) 476

by spaceyhackerlady (#48908911) Attached to: Best 1990s Sci-fi show?

Star Trek: The Next Generation was generally well-done, with interesting charcerters and only a few clunker episodes.

I found Deep Space 9 an interesting concept let down by unimaginative writing.

I found Voyager unwatchable. Janeway came across as an affirmative action bureaucrat. A Captain is a monarch, not a bureaucrat. Patrick Stewart had played Shakespearean kings, and played Picard the same way. It worked. What Janeway needed was a good desk.

Sliders was a really interesting premise that ran out of steam. The same story every week. Yawn.

The X Files also started out well and also ran out of steam, descending in to torture porn.

Didn't watch any of the others, so no comment.

...laura

Comment: Terminology, please! (Score 2) 388

There is strong encryption, and there is unbreakable encryption. They are not necessarily the same thing.

Strong encryption is theoretically breakable, but it is not computationally feasible to do so. What is computationally feasible changes with time. Look at how key-length standards for RSA have changed, for example.

One-time pad encryption, on the other hand, is not breakable. It doesn't matter how much computer power you throw at it: if you don't have the key, you can't read the message.

...laura

Comment: Re:Crop + correction makes this pointless (Score 1) 192

by ChrisMaple (#48873997) Attached to: Samsung's Advanced Chips Give Its Cameras a Big Boost

Deconvolution is a tricky game. For one thing, as you mentioned, the deconvolution matrix varies across the frame, and for another, it often must be much larger than the related convolution matrix (PSF). It is often ill-conditioned (effectively, that means there's a number close to zero in the denominator), and it always magnifies noise. If there are saturated regions in the image, they can't be handled properly.

Deconvolution and other postprocessing can improve images, but turning a grey mess into a beautiful full color photo is something that can usually be done only under tightly controlled conditions. All too often, there's something screwy in the results.

Comment: Re:Crop + correction makes this pointless (Score 1) 192

by ChrisMaple (#48873921) Attached to: Samsung's Advanced Chips Give Its Cameras a Big Boost
There are limits to what you can correct in software. Correcting chromatic aberration greater than 2 pixels is futile. Correcting barrel or pincushion distortion reduces resolution. Sharpening images makes noise worse and introduces artifacts such as ringing. (Trying to reduce noise diminishes textures.) Software helps, but great software with a mediocre lens is inferior to mediocre software with a great lens.

Comment: Re: Technically DSLR doesn't specify a mirror or n (Score 1) 192

by ChrisMaple (#48873815) Attached to: Samsung's Advanced Chips Give Its Cameras a Big Boost

It takes a mirror to be a reflex camera, and it is only related to the shutter in that the mirror has to not block the light to the sensor/film when a picture is taken. Twin Lens Reflex (TLR) cameras use a fixed mirror, unrelated to the shutter. Beam splitter Single Lens Reflex (SLR) cameras like the Canon Pellix and Canon EOS RT use a fixed mirror unrelated to the shutter. Conventional SLRs use a flip-up mirror that moves before the shutter opens and flops down after the shutter closes.

Reflex refers to the optical path to the viewfinder, involving a reflection.

You know, the difference between this company and the Titanic is that the Titanic had paying customers.

Working...