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Comment: Why are people surprised? (Score 2) 481

by dbrian1 (#37803646) Attached to: Anonymous Hackers Take Down Child Porn Websites
I'm not sure why people are surprised. The general collective has always seemed to have a conscience. Their tactics may be illegal but they generally push forward a righteous agenda. Protesting rigged Iranian elections, exposing BofA corruption, defending WikiLeaks and in general defending free speech. I'm not saying they are saints or that they are justified in their actions, just that this fits their m.o.

I'm not sure how you justify the Sony attacks but I'm sure it had something to do with corporate greed and perceived threats to free speech.

Comment: Re:SSH keys? (Score 2) 101

by dbrian1 (#37368702) Attached to: Linux Foundation, Linux.com Sites Down To Fix Security Breach

I don't see why having private keys on a server would be less secure than having these on your laptop/phone, which is much easier to steal or borrow...

My laptop is only vulnerable to theft by people I am in physical contact with and is generally my responsibly to secure while connected to the Internet. Placing SSH keys on a server means I'm giving these keys and any access they grant to the admins of said server and am placing my trust in them to keep them secure. This is fine for automated trust relationships between hosts but not generally a good idea for personal keys.

When you don't know what to do, walk fast and look worried.

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