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Comment: As true as "hybrid cars get 400 MPG" (Score 1) 461

by davek (#47316305) Attached to: Half of Germany's Power Supplied By Solar, Briefly

If you cherry-pick data, you can get it to say just about anything. It's similar to how hybrid cards are allowed to use MPG data from when only the electric motor is running, making the clain that they get hundreds of miles per gallon. What did they /do/ with that electricity? Could it be stored and used when the sun went down? How efficient are they over time? I'm sorry, but nuclear power and continued prudent use of fossil fuels are the ONLY solutions for the worlds energy problems. It is physically and mathematically impossible to power the world with straight wind or sun power (which is not to say it couldn't be used as a catalyst in some yet-to-be-discoved process).

Sorry to rain on your solor parade.

Comment: Re:Let's look at the Canadian example (Score 1) 222

by davek (#47297943) Attached to: WikiLeaks Publishes Secret International Trade Agreement

Canada was openly ridiculed by the US for not deregulating its financial industry right up until the financial disaster. By an large, Canada escaped disaster that plagued the other G8 countries in the banking meltdown.

So, we have recent proof that strict financial regulation works and yet they want to keep doubling down on deregulation?

The argument of "See! It works in $OTHER_COUNTRY! Why is the US so dumb in not doing it the same way?" is getting really tired. Maybe if the US was full of 300 million Canadians, I might agree with you, but it isn't. Even if I stipulate that Canada "works" (which I certainly do not), what works there doesn't necessarly work here

Also, the Canadian housing bubble never really popped. Rest assured that it will. http://www.thefinancialblogger...

Comment: Re:Ghash.IO is not consistently over 51%, yet anyw (Score 2) 281

by davek (#47244587) Attached to: Bitcoin Security Endangered By Powerful Mining Pool

Not yet anyways.

6 months ago GHash.IO promised they would
(1) Take steps to prevent accumulating 51% hashing power, including: not accepting new miners, and
(2) They would not attempt an attack, and (3) They would provide cex.io users an option to use another mining pool
(They have apparently not implemented (3) yet).

A DDoS against the pool was reported to occur yesterday, which adversely affected mining.
At one point... their hashrate was reported to have dropped to 7%.
Then BitFury pulled 1 PH/s out of their pool.

Excellent post. BTC haters gonna hate, and I don't understand why.

Funny thing about pooled mining, it's run by the users. User's don't like it? They go away.

Comment: Re:DRM (Score 1) 76

by davek (#47055275) Attached to: Kaleidescape Settles With DVD CCA But No Victory For DRM

Excellent post. Right on.

DRM has been a huge success in accomplishing what it was designed to do: NOT prevent piracy, but rather retard development, stifle innovation and new businesses and business models, and keep control of high-demand consumer products in the hands of a few individuals with infintely deep pockets.

Comment: Re:Stocks? (Score 2) 404

by davek (#46898379) Attached to: Rand Paul Suggests Backing Bitcoin With Stocks

something with intrinsic value, like stocks

Stocks have no more intrinsic value than our paper currency.

Incorrect. If I buy a share in PepsiCo, I then receive a tiny fraction of the profit of EVERY single Pepsi sold on earth. That's work. That's economic production. The share has "intrinsic value" because it gives me access to their profits. This is also why, at it's core, the stock market is not a casino (although government regulation and crony capitalism make stock purchases much more like a "bet").

I think the whole crypto currency thing will evolve into more of a stock market type of thing, with companies running their own block chains as a way of selling shares.

Comment: Re:Neat (Score 1) 217

by davek (#46809755) Attached to: Reinventing the Axe

The new way of doing things is called a log splitter. You can get one pretty cheap now (especially if you can do with electric), and while it doesn't have that same rustic appeal, it works really damn well. Personally splitting and stacking was my chore as a kid (I'd guess I’ve split at least 60 cord in my lifetime), and I'm not planning to ever split a log by hand again.

I did also, but I never hated it. I always preferred to swing the axe rather than sit hunched over a giant piston. And as a teenager, wielding an axe to chop firewood is a MUCH better stress reliever than lashing out at parents or going to school with a gun. Very therapeutic, in my opinion.

Comment: Re:Rewarding the bullies... (Score 1) 798

Here's the thing: Everyone has been bullied at some point in their life. Not all children are prone to it, but there is always a bigger kid prone to intimidation tactics when growing up.

Kids live by the law of the playground jungle when adult supervision and rules are absent from the equation. It is ingrained into us as some form of social stepping stone, the animal in each of us at work, attempting dominance and security for an insecure bully.

There is a time honored civil process in which we attempt to retrain our young into civilized little pricks. Picking on the weak is wrong, and you don't get to take advantage of a fellow human because you're physically or mentally able to do so.

Everyone is small and helpless early, and many are old and helpless late in life. These rules benefit us all, and what happened here sends precisely the wrong message.

To quote the movie Paranorman :

Neil: Nah. You can't stop bullying, it's part of human nature. If you were bigger and more stupid, you'd probably be a bully too. It's called, survival of the thickest.

Profound.

Comment: Re:PCs aint expensive (Score 3, Interesting) 452

by davek (#46716499) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How To Start With Linux In the Workplace?

Not sure why they'd be trying so hard to save themselves from buying new PCs.. Probably the XP machines run like ass as it is.
Linux as a general use machine for people that are so bad at computers they still use XP.... just no.. hell no. tell the boss to stop being so cheap and upgrade to this decade

I think this is correct.

Even though I'm at work, running Ubuntu 12.04 with LXDE, and I have full ability to do everything I need to do, I wouldn't want to be /forced/ to use any OS or tool that wasn't the best for my work. I'm a software engineer, working on linux embedded systems, so having a linux desktop is the best for me. Our IT also allows linux to be run on the desktop, but doesn't support a lot of the details. THAT's the best way to go. Provide your users with a wide range of tools. For those that don't care, give them windows. Forcing them to use Linux won't win anyone over.

That said, I'd set up LXDE + Ubuntu 12.04 (or later), and give that to people to try. Just don't force them to use it.

Comment: Re:Politically correct sexism (Score 1) 673

by davek (#46713481) Attached to: Google: Teach Girls Coding, Get $2,500; Teach Boys, Get $0

This is so flagrantly sexist that it's absurd. But luckily for Google, it's the politically correct form of sexism. It's been decreed that programming being male dominated is bad, and thus taking sexist action to fix it is okay.

Google is a private, non-government run company. They are fully within their right to offer incentives for more girls to get into computer science. Or blacks. Or native americans. Or Jews. Or whites. Or whoever they think needs help.

Stop focusing on false flag, and rather on the government's croney capitalism that allows Google to dodge taxes and eliminate competition. "Don't be Evil" has truely become the most ironic slogan of all time.

Comment: Re:"It's been turned over to other people" ? (Score 4, Informative) 390

by davek (#46420777) Attached to: Bitcoin Inventor Satoshi Nakamoto Outed By Newsweek

Close, but not quite.

I assume you're asking how the "mining" works, and that's actually pretty easy to explain.

Each bitcoin block is generated with a SHA256 hash of the block's header. Presumably, the header information is not guessable, otherwise it would be pointless.

The SHA256 hash becomes the "target." In order to successfully mine the block, you must produce a hash with a value lower than the target. The lower the target, the harder it is to mine the block.

The "target" is in fact the difficulty. Essentially a difficulty of 1 means an applicable proof-of-work block solution would be less than 2^256 >> 1 (I could be wrong on the max size, I'd have to look it up). A block "solution" is a sha-256 hash of (merkle root (which is generated by doing a merkle tree starting with the transaction IDs of all the transactions since the last block) + some other header stuff + a nonce). The header stuff is completely public and known. The "work" miners to is generate trillions upon trillions of those nonces (which is just a word for a random piece of data), calculate the sha-256, and see if the resulting sha is less than the target.

Successfully mining a block is essentially like winning the lottery because there is no known way to make educated guesses about what text might produce a hash below the target's value.

Once an acceptable hash has been generated by a miner, it is submitted to the network with a proof of work that permits the rest of the network to essentially check the solution. At that point, the block is considered completed, the transactions are processed, and the successful miner is awarded the transaction fees plus 20 new BTC.

It's fees + 25 BTC. But that will change eventually, as we approach the max of 22 million BTC in circulation.

I don't think the rainbow table comparison is apt because you're not attempting to produce hash collisions, only find hashes below a set value. Finding a collision is exponentially more difficult, by design.

A "rainbow table" in this case would have to have a number of entries greater than the size of particles in the known universe, I think. We're talking about stupidly large numbers here.

Comment: Re:A ban? What ban? (Score 1) 207

by davek (#46186709) Attached to: Russia Bans Bitcoin

The linked official press release simply reiterates that bitcoins are getting more wide use including criminal use. That the bitcoins are not legal tender. That bitcoins are not backed by anything or anybody but speculative interest and that bitcoin holders are not afforded legal protection of their property rights in respect of their bitcoin investments. Is the word "banned" being misused here?

From the translation:

In accordance with Art. 27 of the Federal Law "On the Central Bank of the Russian Federation", "the official currency (currency) of the Russian Federation is the ruble. Introduction on the territory of Russia and other monetary units issue money substitutes is prohibited. " Certain distribution received anonymous payment systems and kriptovalyuty, including the most famous of them - Bitcoin are money substitutes and can not be used by individuals and legal entities.

I'm pretty sure the ruskies would have a strict interpretation of "can not be used by individuals." Sounds like it's a ban.

I'll be interested to see if BTC can hold above $500 at the end of the day.

Comment: Re:the moral of the story (Score 4, Insightful) 448

by davek (#46100613) Attached to: Developer Loses Single-Letter Twitter Handle Through Extortion

like so many other articles, this just seems like another reminder to never ever use godaddy

Perhaps this is more of an indictment of using ANY non-big-brother email provider for login information to ANY domain registrar. It seems to me the crux of this attack was to a) gain access to the victem's domain registrar account and then b) hijack the domain MX record so all email to that domain goes to the attacker's server. At that point, you can reset all the victem's passwords to all accounts and ALL password reset emails will go to the attacker.

Time to enable 2-factor on all my registrar accounts.

I took a fish head to the movies and I didn't have to pay. -- Fish Heads, Saturday Night Live, 1977.

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