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Patents

+ - China's ZTE And Huawei Join The German Patent Fray->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Germany has pretty much become the new Eastern District of Texas, the world's most popular patent battleground. After Apple, Samsung and Motorola, the Chinese are now going to Germany as well to sort out their domestic patent squabbles. Huawei and ZTE, arguably the People's Republic's leading wireless tech companies, started suing each other in April last year. On Friday the Mannheim Regional Court held a Huawei vs. ZTE hearing, reports a local patent watcher. Huawei says ZTE infringes a 4G/LTE handover patent and wants its rival's base stations and USB modem sticks banned in Germany. More clashes between the two are coming up in the same court and in other places in Europe, including France."
Link to Original Source
Patents

+ - Apple Seeks Patent on Celebrity Spotting

Submitted by theodp
theodp (442580) writes "To paraphrase Ken Kesey, 'You're either on the TMZ Celebrity Spotting Bus or off the bus.' Well, from the looks of its newly-published patent application for Auto-Recognition for Noteworthy Objects, Apple is definitely on the bus. 'The present invention relates to determining whether famous people or objects appear in digital images that are taken or identified by a user,' explains Apple. Its techniques for automatically identifying famous people, Apple adds, employ 'faceprints of a famous person's face, such as Tom Hanks, or of an iconic image, such as the Mona Lisa, Michelangelo's David, or Santa Claus, that are generated separately from and remotely relative to the digital image management software used by an end-user.' Apple further notes that its innovation has tackled the pressing problem of spotting celebrities over the decades: 'Multiple faceprints of Paul McCartney may be stored in remotely-generated faceprint database 130. In an embodiment, such faceprints are selected based on how Paul McCartney has changed (e.g., aged) over time. For example, remotely-generated faceprint database 130 may include a faceprint for each decade of his life beginning with, e.g., the 1960's decade. Thus, remotely-generated faceprint database 130 may include at least 5 faceprints, each of which is associated with Paul McCartney.' Nice, but can Apple tell us whether the images are actually Paul McCartney or an Impostor?"
Security

+ - Researchers Convert Phones into Secret Listening Devices->

Submitted by
CowboyRobot
CowboyRobot writes "Columbia University grad student Ang Cui demonstrated how networked printers and phones can be abused by attackers. "The attack I demonstrated is caused by the multiple vulnerabilities within the syscall interface of the CNU [Cisco Native Unix] kernel," Cui tells Dark Reading. "It is caused by the lack of input validation at the syscall interface, which allows arbitrary modification of kernel memory from userland, as well as arbitrary code execution within the kernel. This, in turn, allows the attacker to become root, gain control over the DSP [Digital Signal Processor], buttons, and LEDs on the phone. The attack I demonstrated patches the existing kernel and DSP in order to carry out stealthy mic exfiltration.""
Link to Original Source
Transportation

+ - Solar Impulse announces flight across America for next year->

Submitted by cylonlover
cylonlover (1921924) writes "Flush with success from their 6,000-km (3,728-mile) Europe-to-Africa round-trip flight earlier this year, the duo behind the Solar Impulse solar-powered aircraft are now planning on flying it across America next spring. It will mark the first time that a solar-powered plane has traversed the country. Solar Impulse partners Bertrand Piccard and André Borschberg made the official announcement this Tuesday, although the logistics of the flight have yet to be finalized. They have stated that the trip will be broken into 20-hour legs, starting at San Francisco and proceeding to New York City. As with their previous multi-leg flights, the two pilots will take turns flying the aircraft."
Link to Original Source
Wireless Networking

802.11n Should Be Finalized By September 104

Posted by Soulskill
from the speedy-process dept.
adeelarshad82 writes "It's probable that the 802.11n standard will finally be approved at a scheduled IEEE meeting this September, ending a contentious round of infighting that has delayed the standard for years. For the 802.11n standard, progress has been agonizingly slow, dating back almost five years to 2004, when 802.11g held sway. It struggled throughout 2005 and 2006, when members supposedly settled on the TGnSync standard, then formed the Enhanced Wireless Consortium in 2006 to speed the process along. A draft version of 802.11n was approved in January 2006, prompting the first wave of routers based on the so-called draft-n standard shortly thereafter."
The Internet

+ - HTML V5 and XHTML V2

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "While the intention of both HTML V5 and XHTML V2 is to improve on the existing versions, the approaches the developers chose to make those improvements is very different. And with differing philosophies come distinct results. For the first time in many years, the direction of upcoming browser versions is uncertain. This article uncover the bigger picture behind the details of these two standards."
Censorship

+ - Digg.com Attempts to Supress HD-DVD Revolt

Submitted by
fieryprophet
fieryprophet writes "An astonishing number of HD-DVD encryption key releated stories have gone MIA, in many cases along with the digger who submitted it. As a result, many in the digg community are becoming disillusioned with the "democratic" news site and retaliating in clever and inventive ways. Search digg for HD-DVD song lyrics, coffee mugs, shirts, and more for a taste of the rebellion."
IBM

+ - IBM Layoffs

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A total of 1,315 IBM employees were laid off Tuesday, many from within the company's infrastructure services group. Luckily the executives can still afford their $100,000 dinners. http://money.cnn.com/2007/05/01/lifestyle/luxury_l unch/index.htm http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/a rticle?AID=/20070501/BUSINESS01/705010335 http://www.informationweek.com/news/showArticle.jh tml?articleID=199203022 http://www.allianceibm.org/jobcutstatusandcomments .php"

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