Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Faraday Cage (Score 3, Insightful) 85

by condition-label-red (#45087191) Attached to: In Room With No Cell Service, Verizon Works On Future of Mobile

It is called a Faraday Cage and it works very well at blocking RF signals. Pix....

I helped assemble one many years ago. There was an FM radio inside the cage that would receive the local campus station quite well...until the cage door was closed, then would just hiss.

Comment: Hyperbole much? (Score 1) 247

Since the computer is *new* billions, if not trillions of times a second, then software doesn't make it unique.

billions a second == 1e9 per second == 1GHz

trillions a second == 1e12 per second = 1THz

I am pretty sure there are NO general purpose computers operating at anywhere near 1THz.

Comment: energy positive; storage friendly (Score 1) 340

From the article, it seems this is an energy positive process:

The energy stored in xylose splits water molecules, yielding high-purity hydrogen that can be directly utilized by proton-exchange membrane fuel cells. Even more appealing, this reaction occurs at low temperatures, generating hydrogen energy that is greater than the chemical energy stored in xylose and the polyphosphate. This results in an energy efficiency of more than 100 percent â" a net energy gain. That means that low-temperature waste heat can be used to produce high-quality chemical energy hydrogen for the first time. Other processes that convert sugar into biofuels such as ethanol and butanol always have energy efficiencies of less than 100 percent, resulting in an energy penalty.

Also it is suited for use in a fuel cell. One possible automotive implementation might be: a slurry of plant matter + enzymes => hydrogen + fuel cell => electricity => electric motors. This would avoid the hydrogen storage issues and provide an easily stored (i.e. slurry) energy source.

Hmm....

Mars

4-Billion-Pixel Panorama View From Curiosity Rover 101

Posted by samzenpus
from the take-a-look dept.
SternisheFan points out that there is a great new panorama made from shots from the Curiosity Rover. "Sweep your gaze around Gale Crater on Mars, where NASA's Curiosity rover is currently exploring, with this 4-billion-pixel panorama stitched together from 295 images. ...The entire image stretches 90,000 by 45,000 pixels and uses pictures taken by the rover's two MastCams. The best way to enjoy it is to go into fullscreen mode and slowly soak up the scenery — from the distant high edges of the crater to the enormous and looming Mount Sharp, the rover's eventual destination."
Firefox

Emscripten and New Javascript Engine Bring Unreal Engine To Firefox 124

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the cycle-is-nearly-complete dept.
MojoKid writes "There's no doubt that gaming on the Web has improved dramatically in recent years, but Mozilla believes it has developed new technology that will deliver a big leap in what browser-based gaming can become. The company developed a highly-optimized version of Javascript that's designed to 'supercharge' a game's code to deliver near-native performance. And now that innovation has enabled Mozilla to bring Epic's Unreal Engine 3 to the browser. As a sort of proof of concept, Mozilla debuted this BananaBread game demo that was built using WebGL, Emscripten, and the new JavaScript version called 'asm.js.' Mozilla says that it's working with the likes of EA, Disney, and ZeptoLab to optimize games for the mobile Web, as well." Emscripten was previously used to port Doom to the browser.
Spam

+ - DDoS Feud Backfires: Bulletproof CyberBunker Busted->

Submitted by kierny
kierny (102954) writes "The tables turned Thursday on anarchic Dutch hosting provider CyberBunker, which has been accused of backing an Internet-busting DDoS disruption campaign against anti-spam site Spamhaus. But as of Thursday morning, CyberBunker found its own "bulletproof" website knocked offline, making it the apparent victim of a sustained DDoS attack. Similarly, the website of the Stophaus.com campaign that's been organizing the attacks was also disrupted, displaying on a "database error." No one has claimed credit for the pro-Spamhaus takedowns."
Link to Original Source
Movies

+ - New Animation Tech Could Make Motion Capture Suits Obsolete->

Submitted by Zothecula
Zothecula (1870348) writes "Actors may soon say good-bye to those humbling Lycra body suits commonly used in the visual effects industry, thanks to a group of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Informatics (MPII). They've formed a start-up called The Captury that is set to deliver its proprietary markerless motion capture software later this year. Their software can even capture a costume's surface detail in three dimensions, like the draping folds in a ballroom dress."
Link to Original Source
Hardware

+ - A Crash Course on Data Centers->

Submitted by Pieroxy
Pieroxy (222434) writes "Everyone is talking about "cloud", AWS and other hosting solutions where basically all the hardware details are hidden from you. But what if you want to manage your own hardware? What should you be aware of when visiting a datacenter? Criteo's engineering blog got an interesting introduction about datacenters, with some pointers on books and articles you should read to get started."
Link to Original Source
Data Storage

+ - Animation sophistication: The Croods required 80 million compute hours to create->

Submitted by Lucas123
Lucas123 (935744) writes "It may be a movie about a stone age family, but DreamWorks said its latest 3D animated movie "The Croods" took more compute cycles to create than any other movie they've made. The movie required a whopping 80 million compute hours to render, 15 million more hours than DreamWorks' last record holder, "The Rise of the Guardians." The production studio said between 300 and 400 animators worked on "The Croods" over the past three years. The images they created, from raw sketches to stereoscopic high-definition shots, required about 250TB of data storage capacity. When the movie industry moved from producing 2D to 3D high-definition movies over the past decade, the data required to produce the films increased tremendously. For DreamWorks, the amount of data needed to create a stereoscopic film leaped by 30%."
Link to Original Source

There are worse things in life than death. Have you ever spent an evening with an insurance salesman? -- Woody Allen

Working...