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+ - Samsung admits to software bug on 840 EVO SSDs->

Submitted by Lucas123
Lucas123 (935744) writes "Samsung has issued a firmware fix for a bug on its popular 840 EVO triple-level cell SSD. The bug apparently slows read performance tremendously for any data more than a month old that has not been moved around on the NAND. The 840 EVO is one of the companies most affordable SSDs, as it retails for under 50 cents a gig. Samsung said in a statement that the read problems occurred on its 2.5-in 840 EVO SSDs and 840 EVO mSATA drives because of an error in the flash management software algorithm. Some users on technical blog sites, such as Overclock.net, say the problem extends beyond the EVO line. They also questioned whether the firmware upgrade was a true fix or just covers up the bug by simply moving data around the SSD."
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+ - Ethernet is coming to cars-> 3

Submitted by Lucas123
Lucas123 (935744) writes "Automobile industry support for Ethernet as an interconnect specification for all electronics in the car and for the car to connect to the Internet outside the car is growing quickly. Additionally, one of the largest suppliers of silicon to the industry — Freescale — today announced its first automotive-grade Ethernet modules. The 100Mbps modules will offer up to four separate video ports and can connect together instrument clusters, infotainment systems and telematics all on the same ring topology. Driving Ethernet adoption in vehicles are trends such as such as federally mandated backup cameras, lane-departure warning systems, traffic light recognition and collision avoidance sensors, and in-vehicle WiFi as well as streaming video on embedded displays. While Freescale's not the first to offer an automotive-grade Ethernet chipset, it is the largest supplier to date. By 2020, many cars will have 50 to 60 Ethernet ports and even entry-level vehicles will have 10, according to a study by research firm Frost & Sullivan. (Premium vehicles will likely have more than 100 Ethernet nodes by then.)"
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+ - Researchers Scrambling to Build Ebola-Fighting Robots->

Submitted by Lucas123
Lucas123 (935744) writes "U.S. robotics researchers from around the country are collaborating on a project to build autonomous vehicles that could deliver food and medicine, and telepresence robots that could safely decontaminate equipment and help bury the victims of Ebola. Organizers of Safety Robotics for Ebola Workers are planning a workshop on Nov. 7. that will be co-hosted by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, Texas A&M, Worcester Polytechnic Institute and the University of California, Berkeley. "We are trying to identify the technologies that can help human workers minimize their contact with Ebola. Whatever technology we deploy, there will be a human in the loop. We are not trying to replace human caregivers. We are trying to minimize contact," said Taskin Padir, an assistant professor of robotics engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute."
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+ - Tesla teardown reveals driver-facing electronics built by iPhone 6 suppliers ->

Submitted by Lucas123
Lucas123 (935744) writes "There's a lot to like about the Tesla Model S. It's an EV that can go from from 0 to 60 mph (96 km/h) in 4.2 seconds and can travel 265 miles on a single charge. But, a tear down of the vehicle by IHS Technology has also revealed that Elon Musk avoided third-party design and build routes used traditionally by auto makers and spared no expense on the instrument cluster and infotainment (head unit) system, which is powered by two 3, 1.4Ghz, quad-core NVIDIA Tegra processors. IHS called the Tesla's head unit the most sophisticated it's ever seen, with 1,000 more components than any it has previously analyzed. A bill of materials (BOM) for the virtual instrument cluster and the premium media control unit is also roughly twice the cost of the highest-end infotainment unit examined by IHS. Andrew Rassweiler, senior director for materials and cost benchmarking at IHS, said the use of large displays in the cabin, the touch-screen-based controls, and the mobile microchips make "the Tesla experience more like a media tablet or high-end smartphone than a traditional automobile.""
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+ - Tiny Wireless Device Offers Tor Anonymity ->

Submitted by Lucas123
Lucas123 (935744) writes "The Anonabox router project, currently being funded through a Kickstarter campaign, has surpassed its original $7,000 crowdfunding goal by more than 10 times in just one day. The open source router device connects via Wi-Fi or an Ethernet cable making it harder for your IP address to be seen. While there have been other Tor-enabled routers in the past, they aren't small enough to fit in a shirt pocket like the Anonabox and they haven't offered data encryption on top of the routing network. The device, which is being pitched as a way for consumers to securely surf the web and share content (or allow businesses to do the same), is also being directed at journalists who may want to share stories in places where they might otherwise be censored."
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+ - Snapchat Says Users Were Victimized By Their Use of Third-Party Apps->

Submitted by Lucas123
Lucas123 (935744) writes "Reports that the servers of photo messaging site Snapchat were hacked are being denied by the company, which is now is saying its users were instead victimized by their use of third-party apps to send and receive Snaps. Hackers on 4chan have said broke into the site and they're preparing to release 200,000 photos or videos in their own database that will be searchable by Snapchatter name. According to one report, the third-party Snapchat client app enabled access for years to the data that was supposed have been deleted. The hackers have said they have a 13GB photo library. For its part, Snapchat in a statement reiterated its Terms of Use Policy, that "expressly prohibits" third-party app use "because they compromise our users' security.""
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+ - Intel processors fails at math. Again.

Submitted by rastos1
rastos1 (601318) writes "In a recent blog, software developer Bruce Dawson pointed out some issues with the way the FSIN instruction is described in the “Intel® 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer’s Manual.”, noting that the result of FSIN can be very inaccurate in some cases, if compared to the exact mathematical value of the sine function.

Bruce Dawson says: I was shocked when I discovered this. Both the fsin instruction and Intel’s documentation are hugely inaccurate, and the inaccurate documentation has led to poor decisions being made. ... Intel has known for years that these instructions are not as accurate as promised. They are now making updates to their documentation. Updating the instruction is not a realistic option.

Intel processors had a problem with math in past"

+ - Are eHealth Records Responsible for Docs Missing Ebola Diagnosis?-> 1

Submitted by Lucas123
Lucas123 (935744) writes "Thomas Eric Duncan died this morning at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas. Duncan had first visited Presbyterian's ER on Sept. 23 with fever, headache and stomach pain, and even though he told a nurse he'd just returned from Liberia, he was sent home. Five days later, Duncan returned via ambulance. Initially, the hospital reported that a flaw in its eHealth records system was responsible for physicians misdiagnosing Duncan. A day later, it retracted that statement. Experts, however, say instead of improving work flow, electronic health records (EHRs) often eat healthcare worker time and distract physicians from patients, creating cognitive dissonance that leads to mistakes. Errors in patient care due to EHRs are "incredibly common," according to a report released last year by the American College of Physicians. Hospitals that are under EHR vendor contracts, however, can prevent physicians from speaking publicly about those problems by using gag clauses. Dr. Randall Case, an emergency room physician and data infomatics expert who has worked for EHR makers such as Cerner and Siemens, said the problem with EHRs is multifaceted. The systems are "thrust" on physicians and nurses, who sometimes receive minimal training and then must adapt their workflows around them. While workflows, user interfaces and the learnability of their systems have improved, the improvements have been marginal, he said."
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+ - Solar Could Lead In Power Production By 2050->

Submitted by Lucas123
Lucas123 (935744) writes "Solar power could be the leading source of electricity compared with other renewables and conventional sources of power, such as oil and coal, according to a pair of reports from International Energy Agency. PV panels could produce 16% of the world's electricity, while solar thermal electricity (STE) is on track to produce 11%. At the end of 2013, there had been 137GW of solar capacity deployed around the world. Each day, an additional 100MW of power is deployed. One reason solar is so promising are plummeting prices for photovoltaic cells and new technologies that promise greater solar panel efficiency. For example, MIT just published a report on a new a material that could be ideal for converting solar energy into heat by tuning the material's spectrum of absorption. Ohio State University just announced what it's referring to as the world's first solar battery, which integrates PV with storage at a microsopic level. "We've integrated both functions into one device. Any time you can do that, you reduce cost," said iying Wu, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry at Ohio State."
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+ - New HDMI Stick Based on Firefox OS Challenges Chromecast->

Submitted by Lucas123
Lucas123 (935744) writes "A new HDMI streaming media stick is preparing to launch and it's taking on Chromecast in both price and hardware performance. The new HDMI dongle from San Jose-based Matchstick will retail for $25 when it begins shipping in February. The dongle runs on a dual-core Rockchip 3066 processor. It has 4GB of onboard storage capacity and 1GB of DDR3 memory. Google's Chromecast uses a single-core Marvell Armada 1500-Mini CPU and has 2GB of flash and 512MB of DDR3. Matchstick said Mozilla recently certified the dongle and the first of the devices will ship in February. The Matchstick project is based on an open hardware and software platform and has launched a developer program called "Matchstick for Apps." The company is raising money for the project through Kickstarter. After three days, it surpassed its 30-day, $100,000 goal with more than $224,000."
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+ - Mercedes-Benz Reveals Self-Driving Semi-Trailer Truck->

Submitted by Lucas123
Lucas123 (935744) writes "Mercedes-Benz displayed an 18-wheel semi-trailer truck that can drive itself on highways. The Mercedes-Benz Future Truck 2025 was demonstrated at the 2014 International Commercial Vehicle show this month. Like other self-driving vehicles, the truck uses sensors and exterior cameras to stay within lanes and detect objects around it in order to adjust speed. The inside of the truck's cab looks like a lounge. The driver's seat rotates 45 degrees to allow autonomous driving away from the steering wheel, and instead of the speedometer and tachometer digital displays, monitors and tablets are placed in the cockpit. Because acceleration and braking is optimized, creating a constant flow of traffic, gas consumption and emissions of the Future Truck 2025 can be reduced, the company said. Transport times are also predictable."
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+ - 3D Printer Able to Produce Skin w/Hair Follicles and Sweat Glands->

Submitted by Lucas123
Lucas123 (935744) writes "A 3D printer developed by researchers at the University of Toronto is capable of using a patient's own cells to print skin. The technology could be used to treat burn victims and patients with other types of injuries, as well as to test pharmaceutical drugs. While still in pilot mode, the new PrintAlive Bioprinter is in the process of being commercialized by MaRS Innovations in collaboration with the Innovations and Partnerships Office (IPO) of the University of Toronto, whose labs have filed two patents on the device. The 3D skin printer works by placing the patient's cells along with other biomaterials into a micro-device, which then pushes them out through several channels. The biomaterials are then mixed, causing a chemical reaction that forms a "mosaic hydrogel", a sheet-like substance compatible with the growth of cells into living tissues. The hydrogel allows the various dermis cells to be seeded in precise and controlled patterns. The resulting thin film is then rolled up to crease thicker layers of tissue."
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