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Comment: Re:Breaking news (Score 1) 307

People raised in a country were the government spies on its citizens, encourages selling people out, and kidnaps dissenters are more likely to lie for personal gain.

Interesting assertion. How about some evidence to support it? Obscuring disagreement with the government to avoid punishment is different from cheating for gain.

My guess is this is more an effect caused by Stasi, and not the communism/capitalism divide.

As far as I know, every communist country had oppressive secret police that engaged in many forms of repression. It is a practical necessity of the system. Not so capitalism, so if you want to attribute the cheating to the Stasi and repression it is related to the communist / capitalist divide.

+ - Experiment Shows The More People Are Exposed To Socialism, The Worse They Behave-> 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The Economist reports, "“UNDER capitalism”, ran the old Soviet-era joke, “man exploits man. Under communism it is just the opposite.” In fact new research suggests that the Soviet system inspired not just sarcasm but cheating too: in East Germany, at least, communism appears to have inculcated moral laxity. Lars Hornuf of the University of Munich and Dan Ariely, Ximena García-Rada and Heather Mann of Duke University ran an experiment last year to test Germans’ willingness to lie for personal gain. Some 250 Berliners were randomly selected to take part in a game where they could win up to €6 ($8). ... The authors found that, on average, those who had East German roots cheated twice as much as those who had grown up in West Germany under capitalism. They also looked at how much time people had spent in East Germany before the fall of the Berlin Wall. The longer the participants had been exposed to socialism, the greater the likelihood that they would claim improbable numbers ... when it comes to ethics, a capitalist upbringing appears to trump a socialist one.""
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Don't you want to be a traitor too? (Score 0) 127

by cold fjord (#47499569) Attached to: Snowden Seeks To Develop Anti-Surveillance Technologies

... I'd want to be a traitor any day...

Lets pick a specific day: April 1, 1940

On that day Bletchley Park was reading the "email" of the German government, having broken the Enigma code - a fragile achievement that could fairly easily be foiled, perhaps permanently .... if the Germans knew about it. As a result of breaking that code, and keeping it secret that it had broken the code, the rights of the German government and people were trampled. The trampling of the rights of the German government and people in that fashion meant that Britain would not be starved into submission by submarine warfare, and ultimately the Allies would win the war. That meant that the trampling of the rights, including the right to live, of the people of Western and Eastern Europe by the then Nazi German government would come to an end.

Beyond that, the ability of the UK and US to read Enigma type machine encrypted messages carried over into the Cold War (which at various points nearly flared into a shooting war, including nuclear war) and played a role in helping the West obtain the intelligence necessary to defeat Soviet Communism which killed far more people than the Nazis did.

So, would-be traitor, is that still a good day for treason for you, knowing that Britain would likely have been starved into submission in WW2, the Nazis might have held on, and Soviet Communism might have lived on indefinitely? Many millions more would have been killed, several genocides would likely have been completed, we might still be faced by both Nazi and Soviet regimes, but nobody would be trampling on the rights of the German people by reading their encrypted mail. But I take it you're OK with that since it is "any day," right?

Just curious.

Isn't there an April 1st coming next year? And the year after that? What battles might be lost then?

Comment: Who will be auditing Snowden's code? (Score 0) 127

by cold fjord (#47499365) Attached to: Snowden Seeks To Develop Anti-Surveillance Technologies

So, who will be auditing Snowden's code? I wouldn't even consider using anything he wrote without independent third party audits .... lots of audits of the code, design, algorithms, everything. And no binaries that he builds.

Imagine the evasive power of the dual or triple functionality achieved by some of the Obfuscated C content entries combined with the subtle designs of Russian government cryptographers. No threat there, no sir.

Comment: Re:The Existence of a "United States of America" (Score -1, Troll) 231

by cold fjord (#47446707) Attached to: NSA Says Snowden Emails Exempt From Public Disclosure

Delusional? The NSA is violating people's rights and the highest law of the land...

Prove it. Prove that their actions are unconstitutional. It is often claimed, but the proof never seems to come. Where is the final court decision that says so? Where is the final court decision that says the Congress, the Executive branch, and all prior court decisions are wrong? Or is it "proved" by assertion only, proof by rhetoric?

Comment: Re:The Existence of a "United States of America" (Score 0) 231

by cold fjord (#47446693) Attached to: NSA Says Snowden Emails Exempt From Public Disclosure

You are a citizen who cares more about your children's survival than the survival of Freedom and the well being of millions. In other words you aren't merely part of the problem, you are the problem.

As is common on Slashdot your histrionics are popular, but it is pure demagoguery. Who are these "millions" whose "well being" you claim are at risk? Hmmm? Who? How is their “well being” at risk?

And what freedom is in danger of not “surviving?”

Your entire post is rubbish and it is a mark of how rare thoughtful moderation is that it is so high.

Comment: Re:Misuse of FOIA (Score 0) 231

by cold fjord (#47445583) Attached to: NSA Says Snowden Emails Exempt From Public Disclosure

He gave up his girlfriend and cushy job, he exposed clear evidence of violation of international treaties and the US Constitution by the world's dominant superpower, and then he endured being stuck in the Moscow Airport (there isn't enough Prozac in the world to make this OK) and is now stuck in Russia, which I assure you, is a severe downgrade from Hawaii.

Since it sounds like he really hasn't been in touch with her it looks more like he dumped his girlfriend. Why hasn't he invited his girlfriend to Russia?
He has stated that the only reason he took his "cushy job" was to steal classified documents:
      Snowden to newspaper: I took contractor job to gather evidence
Snowden couldn't be found in the airport for long stretches of time. Perhaps he was resting in a Russian supplied suite?
The simple truth is we know next to nothing about Snowden's living conditions in Russia, other than he is being protected by the FSB, who has no doubt had many chats with him, and his spokesman is on the FSB's public committee and a friend of Putin.

You'd have a great point if there were any reason we could trust the NSA.

You'd have a great point if there was any reason we could trust Snowden, a man who lied to friends, family, girlfriend, coworkers and the government to steal top secret documents and flee the country. The fact that he as leaked top secret documents doesn't make him trustworthy.

Comment: Re:"unwarranted invasion of personal privacy" (Score 1) 231

by cold fjord (#47445479) Attached to: NSA Says Snowden Emails Exempt From Public Disclosure

Just to protect us, obviously.

Obviously.

Now can you pretend that George Washington was a spymaster that ran a spy ring that spied on both the British and other colonists, and that Benjamin Franklin opened the mail of other colonists for intelligence purposes to aid the war effort? Well, you don't have to pretend, they actually did it.

Comment: Re:"unwarranted invasion of personal privacy" (Score 0) 231

by cold fjord (#47445173) Attached to: NSA Says Snowden Emails Exempt From Public Disclosure

You seem to "know" a lot of things that aren't true.

The gathering of phone metadata by NSA may be disagreeable, but it isn't a "general warrant." Since a court is supervising it and Congress has authorized it, you seem to be on weak ground as to what is constitutional. I disagree with you since you are making a variety of fundamental errors, including the suggestion that I would rather be living in North Korea.

I'm still waiting for this list of "fundamental freedoms" that have been lost.

You should look into the history of privacy in the Constitution. It is just one more thing you don't have a good handle on.

The Right of Privacy

Comment: Re:Snowden's copies? (Score 1) 231

by cold fjord (#47444801) Attached to: NSA Says Snowden Emails Exempt From Public Disclosure

Let's look at what I wrote:

Isn't it ... "odd" ... that Snowden could manage to steal 1.7 million documents, but apparently didn't manage to get copies of his own emails showing his alleged attempts to raise the issues through official channels? Now I wonder why that might be?

You don't think it could be because even if he did "raise the issue" of legality he was given the reasons why they were legal and chose to steal the documents anyway?

No moon or cheese there, and you have no answer for it, hence the name calling by you. Ta ta.

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