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Comment: Re:L.C.D (Score 5, Informative) 425

by clowds (#29641249) Attached to: Apple Takes Action Over Australian Logos
From what I understand (from a local news report) it appears to be over the fact that Woolworths is doing a blanket trademark of every type of trademark item with the new logo.

Now considering that some of the classes of trademarks in Aus are computers and electronics and mobile phones/communication devices; if Woolworths stuck that logo all over the front of a shiny new home brand/Woolworths MP3 player (which they're getting into), there's bound to be some idiot who buys the thing and expects it to work with his iTunes.

The fact that Wooloworths already sells rebranded sim cards and mobile phones this isn't that far a fetch. Granted, I don't see the problem, they're easily distinguishable, but even the smallest similarity and a few dumb customers and Apple has bad press.

Comment: Low watt, high performance? Seg fault (Score 3, Insightful) 93

by clowds (#23692649) Attached to: VIA and NVIDIA Working Together For PC Design
It would be grand to be able to buy a low watt, small box gaming machine that doesn't require 6 fans to keep it cool.

However, with the way things are at the moment in the pc gamespace, I'd be pretty cautious expecting any decent performance, even with their Crysis and Bioshock demoes.

I do miss the days when games had 128 multiplayer maps, ran on cheap $200 video cards well and had more story rather than the shinies but I guess that's progress for you. *sigh*
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+ - EMI removes DRM from parts of catalog

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Ars Technica is reporting that EMI will announce on Monday that it will be freeing much of its catalog from the shackles of DRM. The Wall Street Journal, citing "people familiar with the matter," reports (sub. required) that Apple CEO Steve Jobs will be present at the announcement in London and that the music will be sold through the iTunes Store and possibly other online outlets. n early February rumblings were heard that EMI was thinking about ditching DRM, but EMI was unable to entice the likes of Apple, Microsoft, and others. As it turned out, EMI wanted a considerable advance payment to offset what it perceived as a "risk": selling DRM-free music online. EMI's position was simple: if they sell music without DRM, then users will find trading it that much easier."

It is not for me to attempt to fathom the inscrutable workings of Providence. -- The Earl of Birkenhead

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