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Comment: Re:Bizarro Buzz (Score 1) 368

by cjHopman (#36608028) Attached to: Google Launches Google+ Social Network

From someone who has used it, you are quite wrong.

1. Adding people to circles is manual, but the ui for it makes it quite easy.
2. A person can be added to more than 1 circle.
3. You are not limited to those 4 circles, they are just the defaults, you can add whatever circles you want.
4. When you post, you can assign it to be shared to whatever combination of groups/individual people/special categories that you want. However, the UI is simple and will remember your previous choices and default to your last one.

Honestly, without actually trying it, you shouldn't have made those claims.

Comment: Great Summary!!! (Score 1) 181

by cjHopman (#34593320) Attached to: Judge Ends Massive Porn Lawsuit
From the summary:

...starting with 7,000-person and 9,000-person suits in the first wave...

From the article:

Ford's initial lawsuits were releatively small... by late October that he began filing against 7,000 and then 9,000 individuals at once.

From the summary:

the $350 court filing fee will require an investment of $7.7 million ($1.8 million for the individuals listed so far)

Individuals listed? What listing of individuals? From the article:

For the cases severed yesterday, this would amount to $1.8 million...

Comment: Re:I work for a video rental store (Score 5, Informative) 213

by cjHopman (#32620774) Attached to: Movie Studio Finally Sees the Light On Rentals

Those copies at BB are only licensed for private home exhibition (that's why the rental copies cost a lot more and your company pays royalties when you rent them, dipshit). By renting those out you're cheating not just the studio and the distributor, but also the writers, director and actors out of income. My neighbor down the hall is Columbia Pictures Home Ent's Worldwide President, you want me to pass along a URL to your post?

God I hate freeloaders.

Might want to pull out that law book of yours before commenting on legal matters. The right to rent retail purchased DVDs was affirmed in NEBG v Weinstein. Feel free to read more here.

You've now made a fool of yourself to us, please reconsider before doing the same with your neighbor down the hall.

Comment: Article is based on false assumptions (Score 1) 386

by cjHopman (#32531502) Attached to: For Normals, Jobs' "Retina Display" Claim May Be Fair After All

As pointed out in the article, the assumption that 20/20 is normal vision is absolutely wrong and is based on a self-reported sample of people 120 years ago. Mean visual acuity for ages 18-29 is better than 20/15.

I had a whole bunch of good information to post here, but someone at the article's comments said it even better.

So, shamelessly quoted from there:

40. Daniel Says:
June 10th, 2010 at 9:25 am

It is clearly an exaggerated claim. 20/20 Snellen visual acuity is a reference standard used as a cut-off for the lowest level of normal vision -- not as an average visual acuity for the human population.

Elliott, Yang and Whitaker (1995) published Visual Acuity Changes Throughout Adulthood in Normal Healthy Eyes. In this paper, they reported mean VA for 18-24 was 20/15 (6/4.5 metric). That's the MEAN visual acuity for young adults. So a significant number likely had a better VA than 20/15. 25-29 year old mean actually _improved_ to ~20/13 (6/4 metric). The mean VA increased (approaching 20/20 or 1.0) from that point until reaching a mean VA of 20/20 (6/6 metric) in the 75-year-old group!

20/20 is the wrong VA to use for average human visual acuity. In addition, R.N.Clark at Clarkvision.com reports that people up to 50 can reliably tell the difference between 300 ppi and 600 ppi printouts.

Comment: Re:Is this really beer (Score 2, Informative) 297

by cjHopman (#32433850) Attached to: The Race To Beer With 50% Alcohol By Volume

unfortunately the EU has forced us here in Germany to lower our standards so that people may call it "beer" even if it hasn't been made according to the Reinheitsgebot

And thank god for that... the Reinheitsgebot is one of the worst laws in existence. It was originally written to stop competition in grain prices between brewers and bakers. Yep, that's right, brewers were limited to certain ingredients to keep the price of bread down. This law was then spread to other countries so that brewers who had to follow the law could actually compete in the marketplace. I'm sorry, but that is not the process for making a good law.

Today, the law is merely a marketing sham. That is, marketing departments like to claim that following the law somehow makes the beer better and that their company follows the law; the first is false, and the second usually is.

Comment: Re:Flamebait (Score 0) 1003

by cjHopman (#32414754) Attached to: Google Reportedly Ditching Windows

People managed to check email, schedule tasks and appointments, manage contacts and keep notes before Outlook came on the scene.

Well, kind of. That is, not many people did any of the checking email thing before Outlook came on the scene, and most of those other things were done with paper and pencil.

Note that Outlook is a direct descendant of Microsoft Exchange 1.0 which was packaged with Windows 95 OSR2 in 1996, and released as Outlook in 1997.

Comment: Re:in other news, cementing the BP CEO has started (Score 1) 611

by cjHopman (#32364284) Attached to: Gulf Oil Leak Plugged?

All of the preliminary plans involved using, in some form or another, methods that would allow them to keep the oil rather then having the primary concern of say, stopping the leak all together.

And you claim is that this is because BP was attempting to profit off of this.

I'm sorry, but that is ridiculous. BP's cleanup costs so far are something like $20 million dollars a day, and you claim that they were delaying stopping the leak to gather 5000 barrels of oil a day? $350,000 dollars worth of oil a day? I'm sorry, that doesn't really make sense. BP's civil liability is capped somewhere between $1100 and $3400 dollars per barrel, and you claim that all they care about is collecting the oil that's worth $75 per barrel?

Let me advance another theory. All of the methods that do not actually stop the leak, are methods that have worked in the past and in the worst case cause no damage. The methods that stop the leak all have a worst case scenario that ends with oil leaking at >20x the current rate (or rather the pre-"top kill" rate).

Comment: Re:older developers... (Score 3, Informative) 742

by cjHopman (#31890668) Attached to: Why Linux Is Not Attracting Young Developers
No comparison-based sorting algorithm has complexity less than nlogn. However, there are sorting algorithms that are not comparison-based and thus can have "better" complexity. For example, counting sort is a sorting algorithm with complexity O(n + M) where M is the size of the range of values.

Comment: Re:Statistical analysis of the summary (Score 1) 572

by cjHopman (#30712660) Attached to: Why Programmers Need To Learn Statistics
You are basically saying that the two possibilities are that zed is right, or that all of the other 9 are right. But, we want the probability that zed is right vs the probability that at least one of the others are right, since they all disagree with him. On a side note, I find it amusing that Zed takes his experiences with a nonrepresentative sample of a group to determine that the group itself doesn't understand statistics. As he is a member of the group himself, do you think his rant's self-reference was intentional or is he as oblivious as he claims others are?

Comment: Re:Wrong line of work! (Score 1) 197

by cjHopman (#29612739) Attached to: Relaunched Recovery.gov Fails Accessibility Standards

On my main FreeBSD/amd64 desktop box, I not only make the point of not having Flash on it, I don't even have the choice, as it is not supported by Adobe. So much for accessibility.

Well, when you made the choice of what OS to use you weighed the advantages and disadvantages of each. In particular, you considered the fact that the particular one that you chose was a very small portion of the market and was commonly not supported as well (or not at all) as your other options.

Now, any site that requires flash is making the decision that you are not important enough to support.

Point is, don't blame Adobe, blame yourself and those companies (and others) who require flash.

Comment: Re:why flash? (Score 1) 271

by cjHopman (#29311983) Attached to: Intel's Braidwood Could Crush SSD Market

First of all, DDR RAM is not cheap (at least, not compared to NAND RAM). It costs significantly more per gigabyte than even the most expensive of Intel's offerings for SSD's.

Not actually true. Based on pricing at newegg.com, a 2GB stick of DDR2 can be had for $24. A 32 GB Intel X25-E is $420. That is, DDR2 costs $12/GB and the X25-E is $13.1/GB.

Now, for the ddr drive, you have to consider the cost of the drive itself and other factors. For example, for a ddr ram drive to be practical, I think it needs at least 32GB of space. That is 16 2GB sticks (which probably won't fit in a normal sized drive enclosure) or requires using the much more expensive 4GB sticks. So yeah, in my opinion, there's not really a place for ddr ram drives in the market.

Games

Left 4 Dead SDK Beta Released 75

Posted by Soulskill
from the building-for-braaaains dept.
Valve has released a beta version of their authoring tools for Left 4 Dead. The tools will allow you to "create your own campaign maps, character skins, 3D models, sound effects, and music and load them into the game." The kit includes a level editor and command-line compiling utilities, as well as example maps, props, infected, and explosives. It also brings plugins for a 3D modeling program called SketchUp. Valve has updated their development wiki to go along with the release.

"Trust me. I know what I'm doing." -- Sledge Hammer

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