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Comment: Interesting mod of a waterproof tablet (Score 1) 49

At least one version of the Sony Xperia tablet is waterproof. They also make a waterproof phone.
The issue is chlorine breaks down the the seals. All Google had to do is replace the seals with a chlorine resistant compound.
Xperia have a "glove" mode, so that takes care of that problem.
The result is probably much cheaper than an industrial tablet, or computer.

+ - Slimy Health Insurance companies

Submitted by chromaexcursion
chromaexcursion (2047080) writes "Aetna seems to have declared war against Xarelto.
It's a new (still under patent, no generic) drug to fight blood clots. Xarelto has some issues, it does not work well with a small percentage of the population, but there's a test for that. After passing that blood test it is very effective. It has few side effect, and few drug interactions (other than the obvious aspirin and Nsaids).
The problem is there's a cheap drug Coumadin (warfarin) that has a ton of side effects, and a list of bad drug interactions a mile long. Worse the effect of a given dosage of warfarin varies from manufacturer to manufacturer. Even as bad as one production run to another from the same manufacturer. These problems mean any wafarin user needs a blood test AT LEAST ONCE A MONTH, sometime more often. Doctors have been switching long term blood thinner need to Xarelto. For obvious safety and convenience issues. The real slime of Aetna's choice is that blood tests, which are covered variably. patients may pay considerably out of pocket for the blood test they need. How do I know. I just cancelled my Aetna policy, got a new one from a different company. I've spent the day on the phone with my doctor's office trying to deal with this. They've had a LOT of problems with Aetna. I'm a high priced computer geek. I had a gold plan with Aetna. Aetna isn't trying to cut out the low end.
The worst part is, Xarelto come up on Aetna's web site as Formulary Brand, which means it might cost a bit more depending on the plan. But Formulary means covered. Somehow Aetna has warped Formulary into non-preferred.
Thank god there's a Feb 15 change deadline. I have a new ins, and Xarelto is even brand preferred (cheaper).
Ins companies can be stupid. Some only see the direct cost. Not the indirect cost of ER visits due to bad drug interactions.
Doctors NEED to decide medication. Aetna has crossed the line.
For the idiots that said the US government is setting up kill lists with the affordable healthcare act. Well, they're just stupid, because I didn't get the Aetna policy through healthcare.gov.
some cheap ass corporate accountant decided.
Corporate America is trying to kill me, and you. Figure it out"

Comment: Finally the idiots stop believing sympathic magic (Score 2) 180

by chromaexcursion (#49027013) Attached to: US Gov't To Withdraw Food Warnings About Dietary Cholesterol
That consuming cholesterol actually causes an increase in someone's cholesterol level was never well founded.
It has always fallen in the sympathetic category from any evidence I've ever seen. Tropical oils, which have no cholesterol seem to cause far more problems than butter and eggs.
Diet is the least well understood health issue. Worse, it varies widely between individuals. Perhaps the in'duh'viduals in the FDA have finally caught on.
Given the number of times they've revised dietary recommendations, one can only assume doctors must have been (maybe still are) really ignorant; at least about diet.

NOTE: I said ignorant. For a profession that likes to present itself as all knowing that is an issue. To deny it is stupid.

Comment: CONTRACT! (Score 0) 157

by chromaexcursion (#49026973) Attached to: DMCA Exemption Campaign Would Let Fans Run Abandoned Games
When you buy one of those DRM games there is an implicit contract. The seller has agreed to provide authorization.
Contracts work both ways.
I believe Sony has already run into this problem.
All it takes is one class action suit (for the value of the purchase price of the game per plaintiff) against the current copyright holder to make it too expensive for any company to shut down the servers. Yes, it will take free legal services to do it, but they seem to be available.
In the cases where no one shows up to defend the copyright it's the best possible answer. The copyright is unclaimed and the work is either in public domain or worthless. No more DMCA.

Comment: good CHEAP phone (Score 1) 177

by chromaexcursion (#49008775) Attached to: The First Ubuntu Phone Is Here, With Underwhelming Hardware
I saw an "underwhelming post" must have been a -1. I was hoping to respond to it.
some people want this to compete with an apple or samsung.
Get a life!
This is a cheap phone that works.
Is it spectacular? Full featured?
NO, but it works! too many idiots have no clue. this a a good phone, for the 3rd world.

Comment: Perhaps you've heard of GPS (Score 1) 289

by chromaexcursion (#48751675) Attached to: Extra Leap Second To Be Added To Clocks On June 30
GPS doesn't directly need leap seconds, but it relies on astronomical calculations that do.
I write software that deals with leap seconds. I don't write the stuff that actually calculates them, but I have to make sure not to break it. One of the mottos of the company I work for is "it is rocket science".
A second is a small enough margin of error to be allowable. Most time systems are based on seconds, so that's the smallest reasonable choice.
For the jokers. An error of 1 minute would be 1 nautical mile (almost 2 km). Which is 1 minute of latitude (60 minutes in a degree). Funny how minute and nautical mile are the same.
I'm an astro geek, and a sailor, don't piss in my yard.

Comment: Re:3 minutes is slow? (Score 1) 133

by chromaexcursion (#48639931) Attached to: Tesla About To Start Battery-Swap Pilot Program
I drive long trips all the time.
put the nozzle in, get it running, us the rest room.
That actually takes about 5 minutes, though my trip timer may be including driving into the gas station.
When I was married, any stop took far longer. (That's not why I'm not married now)
why do people seem to want Tesla to fail?

Comment: The system is open to gaming (Score 1) 218

The FCC comment system was written over 50 yrs ago. Back when a senator might actually understand.
Neither party in congress understands the problem now.
Bunch of Friggin Idiots. Blind leading the Blind.
I was tempted to give a history lesson, but this isn't the audience.

SO:

garbage in
garbage out.

Comment: For the most part - NO (Score 1) 118

by chromaexcursion (#48539585) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Paying For Linux Support vs. Rolling Your Own?
For IBM, yes. They do, but only for the parts they support. They buy support for the rest.
I work for a software manufacturer. We internally support the libs that we ship with our products. Usually this just means getting the latest source drops and building them. When there's been a problem we could solve it in our code, but being able to debug into the lib code was the only way to find it.
For major system components, and packages that aren't part of our product, we buy support.
For the average company, there's no way it's cost effective.

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