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Comment: Re:Just damn (Score 2) 382

by MightyMartian (#49149815) Attached to: Leonard Nimoy Dies At 83

Oh, I know. He was well rewarded for playing Spock. I think we all knew this was coming for a while; he had largely retired from public appearances, and then the reports a few days ago that he had been admitted to the hospital.

I plan on celebrating his life and his unique and significant contributions by watching a collection of my favorite ST:TOS episodes;

- Amok Time (who doesn't want to watch horny Vulcans fight to the death)
- City On The Edge Of Forever (more a Kirk episode, but Spock plays a pretty damned important role)
- Doomsday Machine (great scene where Spock removes Decker from command)
- Mirror, Mirror(evil Spock is just so fucking cool, and who doesn't enjoy watching Chekhov writhe in pain)
- A Taste of Armageddon (great episode that shows how Star Trek could go after tough issues in novel ways, and also the first real introduction to Vulcan mind powers)
- The Tholian Web (has a great scene between Spock and McCoy)
- And I'll top it off with The Wrath of Khan

Comment: Re:Hum (Score 1) 382

by MightyMartian (#49149169) Attached to: Leonard Nimoy Dies At 83

I think, once he had come to terms with the good and the bad of playing an iconic and culturally significant character, he was willing to accept that Spock had been a positive influence on a lot of people. In the later years he showed a good deal of pride, and really he and other members of the cast were quite influential in a very positive way.

And, from the perspective of the Star Trek franchise, I think Nimoy has to be given a lot of credit. His portrayal of Spock made him probably the most popular actor of the cast (Bill Shatner has talked in the past of how he got a bit jealous that the bulk of fan mail during the TOS run usually came for Nimoy).

While I don't think much of the reboots, I think there's a reason that Abrams got Nimoy to reprise the role, and showed little interest in Shatner reprising Kirk. Spock is a touchstone character, and if you're going to try to bring some credibility to your reboot, you're going to want to pick that kind of a character for the job.

Comment: Re:Leonard Nimoy is why we have nice things (Score 4, Insightful) 382

by MightyMartian (#49149127) Attached to: Leonard Nimoy Dies At 83

It was a pretty inspirational cast; Spock's dedication to science was inspirational, and there are plenty of people who talk about how Scotty inspired them to engineering. Nichelle Nichols and George Takei both were members of minorities who were given fairly prominent positions on the Enterprise at a time when many minority characters were still played by Caucasians (I'm thinking about Mickey Rooney's obnoxiously awful portrayal of an Asian in Breakfast At Tiffany's, released just five years before ST:TOS).

Comment: Re:In search of... (Score 2) 382

by MightyMartian (#49149097) Attached to: Leonard Nimoy Dies At 83

I was thinking that that was my favorite scene as well. I actually also like the similar scene from The Motion Picture (not included in the original theatrical cut, sadly) where Kirk looks to Spock, who has tears streaming down his face, and explains "I weep for V'ger as I would for a brother." In a movie that sadly lacked the emotional angle that TOS and the later films usually had, it was a nice touch.

Thankfully, Nimoy's mixed feelings about Spock and about his experience on The Motion Picture didn't so taint him that he didn't reprise his character, because that makes me think of his death scene from Wrath of Khan, which again shows Nimoy's ability to bring deep feelings to a character that spent a good deal of time reminding everyone of how logical and dispassionate he was.

Comment: Re:Legacy (Score 3, Interesting) 382

by MightyMartian (#49149023) Attached to: Leonard Nimoy Dies At 83

Yes. The character of Spock in so many ways represented Roddenberry's hope for the future; where reason and science would be used for the betterment of humanity.

What I liked about Nimoy's portrayal was that he always allowed Spock's fundamental humanity to peak out through the sides. It was always subtle, often little more than his famed raising of the eyebrow, but it somehow gave Spock so much depth.

One only has to look at Zachary Quinto's take on Spock to see Nimoy's deliberate and effective acting choices. I'm not saying Quinto's portrayal is bad, but it lacks the subtlety that Nimoy brought to the character.

Comment: Re: file transfer (Score 2) 433

by JWSmythe (#49145089) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Old PC File Transfer Problem

The most ancient laptop I ever touched was a Compaq 386/16 with a 20MB 3.5" 1/2 height IDE drive. It sounds pretty much like the same, or probably the piece of crap I had was a predecessor. I do remember it was clearly a 20MB drive though. I swapped it for a regular desktop 40MB IDE that we had in the shop.

Everything I found about that series says it's IDE. I couldn't find anything specifically saying the physical size, but I suspect it was a 3.5" drive. I seriously doubt it was RLL, MFM, ESDI, or anything more exotic. So he's wasting everyone's time asking rather than just opening it up and seeing "ooh, a IDE drive." Even if it was, he could go find some combination of adapters to use it. Anyone who's worked with stuff long has a box full of adapters and cards for exactly this. Well, I did ditch all my ancient cards on eBay a few years ago.

I'd be surprised if the drive even spins though. Most of the time when I go to try ancient hardware, the drives don't spin, or spin enough, even though the owner remembers that it was working when they shut it off.

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