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Comment: Re:Wearable computing... (Score 2) 236

by bosef1 (#45053819) Attached to: No Love From Ars For Samsung's New Smart Watch

As I seem to recall from back when the History Channel showed history, the original function of the "wrist watch" was jewelry, especially for ladies. Men wore pocket watches, and wrist watches were women's bracelets with a built-in timepiece. From what I remember, wrist watches weren't really appropriate fashion items for men until World War 1, when mass troop coordination required everyone to have an easily accessible timepiece, and wrist-watches fit the bill. So having the wrist watch return the status of jewelry isn't too unprecedented.

I find I prefer to wear a pocket watch at the office. I'm not a good typist, and wearing a wrist-watch bothers me when I use a keyboard. The pocket watch lets me have a convenient timepiece that stays in my pants. Plus you can get some really fancy pocket watches.

Comment: Re:yeah, sure, you betcha! (Score 1) 284

by bosef1 (#44733207) Attached to: The STEM Crisis Is a Myth

I've had similar feelings about the current policy of giving out student loans to anyone who qualifies for any course of study. While it probably in the Federal and State governments' purview to make sure we have adequate qualified people in all courses of study (beyond the usual demands of the market), how many Classical Studies majors (not to pick on them) does the United States need to produce every year, and do we need to subsidize or encourage them, and if so, at what level.

My only observation is regarding your comparison between your student loans and your mortgage. I understand the purpose of your comparison, but it is far harder to give your education, versus your house, to someone else if it doesn't work out. :-)

Comment: Re:so its not global warming? (Score 2) 111

While I'm as much [citations needed] as the next guy; you could, you know, go through the trouble of explaining what this world-fixing solution that "industry / the green lobby / the government doesn't want me to see" instead of forcing me to wade through the YouTube videos. When you do it this way it looks like the worst kind of shyster "at home infinite electricity" solutions.

Comment: Re:'cept budgets are GROWING, just not as much (Score 3, Insightful) 86

by bosef1 (#44528567) Attached to: Air Force Space Fence Being Shut Down

Grow up. If we don't budget for inflation, things are going to suck even more when we get halfway through the fiscal year and realize we don't have the money to get make it to the end. This has nothing to with being a Republican or Democrat and everything with actually trying to plan a project and deliver something to the taxpayer. I realize most households don't have to worry about this on a yearly basis, but both government and big business must if they don't want to fail.

Now if you want to discuss whether it's in our long term national interest to print so much money that year-to-year inflationary growth is something we have to monitor in our budget process, fine. Or if you have thoughts on how to responsibly reduce government services without gutting either our social welfare or military programs (or both), please share. We need some good ideas, 'cause those idiots up on the Hill seem stumped. But just because you don't like inflation doesn't mean you can live in a fantasy land where it doesn't exist.

Science

Fiber Optic Spanner (Wrench) Developed 65

Posted by Soulskill
from the nanites-need-tools-too dept.
xclr8r writes "A technique to use fiber optics to adjust microscopic particles has been developed. 'Rather than an actual physical device that wraps around a cell or other microscopic particle to apply rotational force, the spanner (the British term for a wrench) is created when two laser beams — emitted by a pair of optical fibers — strike opposite sides of the microscopic object, trapping and holding it in place. By slightly offsetting the fibers, the beams can impart a small twisting force, causing the object to rotate in place. It is possible to create rotation along any axis and in any direction, depending on the positioning of the fibers.' Applications of this technology can be used in a number of ways, including cancer research. This technology could be used to actually manipulate DNA. Associate Professor of Physics Samarendra Mohanty states that macroscale applications are a possibility, including 'direct conversion of solar energy to mechanical energy,' or possibly using it to 'simulate an environment in which photons radiated from the sun could propel the reflective motors in solar sails, a promising future technology for deep-space travel.'"

Comment: Re:I worried for a moment... (Score 1) 144

by bosef1 (#42087413) Attached to: HydroICE Project Developing a Solar-Powered Combustion Engine

I thought I had seen some proposals for water injection where the water was only injected during full-power operation, where it would help keep the combustion chamber cool, and boiling the water would put more combustion energy into mechanical work instead of just heat. I agree that using it full-time would have its drawbacks.

The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest wilderness. -- John Muir

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