Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re: Question still remains (Score 2) 124

by biojayc (#49500893) Attached to: Google Adds Handwriting Input To Android
assholes? For offering a free app that adds functionality that wasn't there? They aren't even charging for it! A company releases a complete OS open source, and then gets called an asshole when it releases a free closed source app... You may not like anything closed source, and that's fine and your prerogative. But that doesn't make Google an asshole. Serious question, would they be less of an asshole if they didn't release the app at all? By releasing a free app to those that want it, and making no change to those that don't, their assholery has increased?

Comment: Re: And now, things get Ugly. (Score 1) 120

by biojayc (#49336181) Attached to: Uber To Turn Into a Big Data Company By Selling Location Data
Sorry, was on my phone and forgot that slashdot requires formatting. So double post with better formatting.

You search on google. You click links. Links lead yo pages that have Facebook like buttons. Facebook learned that you visited the page. Facebook has already prescraped the page and classified its content. Facebook now can show it in your feed.

Or.

You search on google. You click a link. That page has google ads. Google knows that you visited it. Google bids on facebooks ad exchange and sometimes wins the auction. Ads show up in the news feed. [Also works for any other advertising platform other than doubleclick(Google)]

Or.

You search on google. You click a link. The page has third party trackers that generate user lists that they sell. Facebook buys said user list. Facebook matches you in the list, and shows you a related ad.

Most likely its the first one.

What is certainly not happening:
You search on google. Click no links. You go to Facebook and see a related ad in the news feed.

Comment: Re: And now, things get Ugly. (Score 1) 120

by biojayc (#49336107) Attached to: Uber To Turn Into a Big Data Company By Selling Location Data
You search on google. You click links. Links lead yo pages that have Facebook like buttons. Facebook learned that you visited the page. Facebook has already prescraped the page and classified its content. Facebook now can show it in your feed. Or. You search on google. You click a link. That page has google ads. Google knows that you visited it. Google bids on facebooks ad exchange and sometimes wins the auction. Ads show up in the news feed. [Also works for any other advertising platform other than doubleclick(Google)] Or. You search on google. You click a link. The page has third party trackers that generate user lists that they sell. Facebook buys said user list. Facebook matches you in the list, and shows you a related ad. Most likely its the first one. What is certainly not happening: You search on google. Click no links. You go to Facebook and see a related ad in the news feed.

Comment: Re:I just don't care (Score 1) 232

by biojayc (#49304059) Attached to: FTC: Google Altered Search Results For Profit
What is the definition of unbiased? No matter what the algorithm is, it's biased toward things that the algorithm favors. It's the same thing with people complaining about Facebook changing their news feed algorithm. It's not like their first attempt was the "right" one, and any change is thus wrong because it's biased. How would you define an unbiased search?

Comment: Re:The reason it's thought of as a boy's field (Score 1) 254

Because to be really good at programming takes an almost obsessive devotion to honing your craft at a young age, and girls are far too social to spend their summers in front of a computer in the basement.

I would argue that that isn't the case at all. While I was one of those little boys who spent way too much time in front of a computer and video games as a kid, that is mostly NOT the case amongst my coworkers (I'm a software engineer at Google). Most seemed to pick it up in college when they chose it as a major, and didn't have much or any experience with computer science before then. I would argue the main difference between those who succeed here and those who don't is intelligence, a hunger to learn (rather than just tinker), and a good work ethic.

I don't mean to say that being locked away in your room as a child programming, etc, would hurt in any way. Again, that was mostly me as a child. I just mean that what matters most is an understanding of computer science and software engineering principles (Data Structures, Machine Learning, etc) not can you bang out a few thousand lines of code in a few hours. I never do that at work. I think it's more important to develop as a child the ability to learn, process, and make connections between ideas, and that can happen via learning in any field.

Just my 2 cents for what they are worth.

Comment: Re: The solution is obvious (Score 1) 579

You do not have to pay for android source code. It is open source. You can download and compile it right now I'd you wish. That's what Amazon did with fire os and what cyanogenmod did. If you want to use Googles apps on a phone you sell, then yes there is an agreement to get access to googles apps on your companies phones.

Comment: Re: The solution is obvious (Score 1) 579

Yes the fix should come from the OS vendor. And they provided it. The hardware manufacturers are more than capable of updating there devices with it. Google doesn't have the ability to push updates to the phones that they didn't release. They do keep the parts that they have control over up to date, I.e. Google Play Services. They are doing what they can to mitigate these problems by pushing more and more of the is capabilities into google play services so they can update without carriers being involves, but then people get upset at that for other reasons. Its a sucky situation, and I wish Google commanded more control over the OS when manufacturers use it, but people get upset at Google for strongarming already. I can't imagine what people would say in that situation.

Comment: Re: AI is always "right around the corner". (Score 0) 564

If you take an AI course, they usually focus on algorithms. Machine learning is a type of AI and at least at my university had a separate class for it. I think doing an intelligent thing should be considered intelligent. Being able to translate text is something that a human would consider intelligence if they saw someone else do it. So a machine doing it should be intelligence just the same. Its artificial perhaps because we taught it.

Comment: Implementation Detail (Score 1) 327

Random thoughts on it.

1. You can click on the domain and see the full url. It's not hidden completely, just have to click to see it.
2. URLs other than the domain name are an implementation detail. They mean nothing on their own, but only what the webserver behind that domain decides they mean. There's no url standard to adhere to. It's just chrome hiding unnecessary information and providing an easy to click search/url bar. While my initial reaction to seeing it was "WHAT?" after thinking about it a second I realized that I mostly ignore the url bar and just care about the domain most of the time. If I want to copy the link I can click on the domain and the whole url appears and is highlighted, or I do what I actually do and hit ctrl+L ctrl+C.

When I watch a tv show, I don't see all the details about what information is being passed to/from the cable provider and my box. Just the channel name. On the web, we don't see all the urls that are flying by with ajax, or iframes. We just see the main url which is usually not that helpful. This seems like a cleaner approach long term.

You can't take damsel here now.

Working...