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Comment: Debian GNOME needs some attention (Score 1) 93

by Bruce Perens (#47979731) Attached to: Debian Switching Back To GNOME As the Default Desktop

After something like 20 years I finally found a system that won't run Debian unstable right now. My Panasonic Toughpad FZ-G1 magnesium tablet + iKey Jumpseat magnesium keyboard. Systemd and GDM break. Bought (for less than full price) because I am a frequent traveler and speaker and really do need something you can drop from 6 feet and pour coffee over have it keep working.

But because of this bug I have ubuntu at the moment, and am not having fun and am eager to return to Debian.

Comment: Bwahahahahahaaha! (Score 1) 354

by msobkow (#47979429) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Finding a Job After Completing Computer Science Ph.D?

Another fool who thought people would be impressed by their PhD.

Get over yourself. Nobody outside of the research world gives a shit. In fact, most companies will avoid interviewing or hiring you because you're going to expect higher pay for your education while having spent less time learning the craft of programming than someone who got into the job market after their BSc. (or equivalent.)

Comment: Re:The sad history of US nuclear weapons. (Score 1) 310

by Animats (#47975529) Attached to: US Revamping Its Nuclear Arsenal

I'm talking about a slightly later period. The third plutonium implosion bomb (Trinity was #1, Nagasaki was #2) was ready to go before the end of the war. Groves decided not to ship it to Tinian. Production rate was about one every 3 weeks.

But that design wasn't suitable for long-term storage. Wikipedia: "The lead-acid batteries that powered the fuzing system remained charged for only 36 hours, after which they needed to be recharged. To do this meant disassembling the bomb, and recharging took 72 hours. The batteries had to be removed in any case after nine days or they corroded. The plutonium core could not be left in for much longer, because its heat damaged the high explosives. Replacing the core also required the bomb to be completely disassembled and reassembled. This required about 40 to 50 men and took between 56 and 72 hours, depending on the skill of the bomb assembly team." It took a few more years to develop a bomb that was suitable for routine storage at an air base.

Comment: Already happened with desktops (Score 1) 234

by Animats (#47975449) Attached to: Do Specs Matter Anymore For the Average Smartphone User?

This already happened with desktop computers. A few years ago, we reached the point where basic desktop machines had a few 3GHz CPUS, a few gigabytes of memory, a terabyte or so of disk, and the capability to talk to a 100MHz Ethernet. There, things stopped. Desktop machines haven't become significantly more powerful since. They still power much of the business world, they work fine, and nobody is "upgrading". Innovation in desktops has become cosmetic - Apple makes one that comes in a round can.

Phones seem to be getting there. The iPhone 6 has no major technical improvements over the iPhone 5. Its specs are comparable to the Nexus 4 of two years ago. We may be approaching that point with phones.

Comment: Things Change with intelligence (Score 1) 310

by WindBourne (#47973933) Attached to: US Revamping Its Nuclear Arsenal
FreedomFirst, for having worked where you have, then you know that nukes are expensive and we really do NOT want to do this.
O tried to get Russia AND China to work on verifying and lowering the warhead counts. China refuses to participate.

However, if another nations top leaders believes that a nuke war IS winnable, and is building new warheads underground, along with creating a massive shelter, such as 3000 miles of underground tunnels, then by cutting our number down, it invites first strike.
And if you ran the numbers, then you know the ONLY way to stop such leaders, is to prevent them from thinking that a nuke war is winnable.

Comment: The sad history of US nuclear weapons. (Score 4, Informative) 310

by Animats (#47971615) Attached to: US Revamping Its Nuclear Arsenal

It's amazing how bad many nuclear weapons were, and perhaps are. The Hiroshima gun bomb wasn't much better than an IED. If the Enola Gay had crashed, it probably would have gone off. (The crew was under orders not to land with the bomb; if they had to return to base, they were to dump it in deep water.)

For a while after WWII, the US didn't actually have any functional nuclear weapons. This was a major secret at the time. The war designs weren't suited for long-term storage. Nobody wanted another gun bomb, and the first generation electronics for triggering implosion didn't store well. A "GI-proof" line of bombs had to be developed.

The first round of Polaris missile warhead wouldn't have worked. This was learned only after there were SSBNs at sea with functional missiles and dud warheads. That took over a year to fix.

In recent years, there was a period for over a decade when the US had lost the ability to make new fusion bombs. The plant to make some obscure material had been shut down, and the proposed, cheaper replacement didn't work.

There was a tritium shortage for years. The old tritium production reactors were shut down years ago, and no replacement was built. The US is now producing tritium using a TVA power reactor loaded with some special fuel rods. Commercial use of tritium (exit signs and such) is way down from previous decades. (Tritium has a half-life of around 11 years, so tritium light sources do run down.)

The US was the last country with a gaseous-diffusion enrichment plant. The huge WWII-vintage plant at Oak Ridge was finally dismantled a few years ago. There's a centrifuge plant in the US, privately run by URENCO, a European company.

The US had a huge buildup of nuclear capability in the 1950s, and most of the plants date from that era. They're worn out and obsolete.

And that's the stuff we know about. Being a nuclear superpower isn't cheap.

"A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices." -- William James

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