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Gamer Plays Over 30 Warcraft Characters 189

Posted by samzenpus
from the please-go-outside dept.
If your significant other complains that you play too much World of Warcraft, just show them this article about a user named "Prepared." He plays an amazing 36 World of Warcraft accounts on 11 different computers at the same time. He is his own raid group. "It costs me exactly $5711 in subscription costs per year with 36 accounts on the 6 month pay schedule," he writes. "Not bad considering I'm looking at it like it's a hobby and there are more expensive hobbies out there than World of Warcraft."
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The Smell of Space 70

Posted by samzenpus
from the excuse-me-while-I-smell-the-sky dept.
According to NASA scientists, space smells a lot like my uncle's workshop. One can detect hints of fried steak, hot metal, and the welding of a motorbike. They have hired Steven Pearce, a chemist and managing director of fragrance manufacturing company Omega Ingredients, to recreate the smell in a laboratory. NASA will use his research to help train potential astronauts. Steven said, "I did some work for an art exhibition in July, which was based entirely on smell, and one of the things I created was the smell of the inside of the Mir space station. NASA heard about it and contacted me to see if I could help them recreate the smell of space to help their astronauts."
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Researchers Claim To Be Able To Determine Political Leaning By How Messy You Are 592

Posted by samzenpus
from the dirty-liberal dept.
According to a study to be published in The Journal of Political Psychology, you can tell someone's political affiliation by looking at the condition of their offices and bedrooms. Conservatives tend to be neat and liberals love a mess. Researchers found that the bedrooms and offices of liberals tend to be colorful and full of books about travel, ethnicity, feminism and music, along with music CDs covering folk, classic and modern rock, as well as art supplies, movie tickets and travel memorabilia. Their conservative contemporaries, on the other hand, tend to surround themselves with calendars, postage stamps, laundry baskets, irons and sewing materials. Their bedrooms and offices are well lit and decorated with sports paraphernalia and flags — especially American ones. Sam Gosling, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, says these room cues are "behavioral residue." The findings are just the latest in a series of recent attempts to unearth politics in personality, the brain and DNA. I, for one, support a woman's right to clean.
Security

US Financial Quagmire Bringing Out the Scammers 272

Posted by timothy
from the brother-where-is-your-empathy? dept.
coondoggie contributes this snippet from NetworkWorld: "You could probably see this one coming. With all of the confusion and money involved you knew there would be cyber-vultures out there looking to cash in. Well the Federal Trade Commission today issued a warning that indeed such increased phishing activities are taking place. Specifically the FTC said it was urging user caution regarding e-mails that look as if they come from a financial institution that recently acquired a consumer's bank, savings and loan, or mortgage. In many case such emails are only looking to obtain personal information — account numbers, passwords, Social Security numbers — to run up bills or commit other crimes in a consumer's name, the FTC stated."
United States

Permanent Links For US Legislation Documents 42

Posted by timothy
from the get-crackin'-blue-book-kids dept.
dizzymslizzy writes "With prompting from the Sunlight Foundation's Open House Project, the US Library of Congress announced today that its online database THOMAS will now generate persistent URLs, known as legislative handles, for legislation documents. As Free Government Info says, 'it is certainly nice to be able to link to legislation with a persistent link! But it would be much better if one could click to create a link rather than following a 600-word description of how to link on another page.' Still, this is a definite step forward for the Library of Congress and for government transparency. From THOMAS: 'Legislative Handles are a new persistent URL service for creating links to legislative documents from the THOMAS web site (http://thomas.loc.gov). With a simple syntax, Legislative Handles make it easy to type in legislative links to bibliographies, reference guides, emails, blogs, or web pages. Legislative Handles, for instance, http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.uscongress/legislation.110hconres196, are a convenient way to cite legislation.'
Software

Algorithms Can Make You Pretty 288

Posted by timothy
from the too-late-for-me dept.
caffeinemessiah writes "The New York Times has an interesting story on a new algorithm by researchers from Tel Aviv University that modifies a facial picture of a person to conform to standards of attractiveness. Based on a digital library of pictures of people who have been judged 'attractive,' the algorithm finds the nearest match and modifies an input picture so it conforms to the 'attractive' person's proportions. The trick, however, is that the resultant pictures are still recognizable as the original person. Here's a quick link to a representative picture of the process. Note that this is a machine-learning approach to picture modification, not a characterization of beauty, and could just as easily be used to make a person less attractive." Note: As reader Trent Waddington points out, the underlying research was mentioned in an earlier story as well.
Data Storage

+ - Converting old e-mail archives to a common format?

Submitted by enormouse
enormouse (737333) writes "I have decades of email stored in various formats: various unix, VAX mail, Lotus Notes/Domino, PROFS, one-off formats, and several PC mail programs, etc. Some I want to keep, some I need to keep. Nothing new, right? Keeping the original applications around isn't a practicable option at this time, and neither is clearing a forest to print it all out. I want to be able to search them, preserve most of the ( html/rich-text) formatting, and obviously attachments. I can cook up converters, but I don't really want to write and maintain an archive system. I am thinking along the lines of an OSS mail or doc management system that I can run in a VM for 5-8 years before I have to move it again. Experiences and suggestions from folks who have gone through this?"
Businesses

+ - Do private companies have to keep their email?

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "So I'm an IT intern at a medium-sized manufacturing business. In short, my superiors have asked me to research if privately-held corporations have to archive all of their email.

Have any laws pertaining to archiving/backing up emails been recently passed or proposed in light of any headline corporate scandals?

Or, more simply put, is it legally ok for employees and administrators at private companies to permanently delete their emails?"
Software

+ - Any creative uses for an extra hard drive?

Submitted by
GM_Kombucha
GM_Kombucha writes "I just moved my music collection off of two internal hard drives, a 20 gig and a 60 gig, onto my much larger external drive. And now I have two utterly empty internals just itching for some action, but I can't for the life of me figure out how to get their motor spinning, if you know what I mean. My first thought was to dual-boot a Linux distro or two (with my current XP setup) but I've had some rather negative experiences on that end, what with my Wacom tablet and my ZyXEL card and my Radeon 9000. So I think I want to go a different route this time, but really, I don't know where to turn. Anyone have any creative, nerdy, semi-pointless uses for these babies? I can't run OS X... but I'm up for just about anything. Thanks!"
The Media

+ - Reiser's wife's ex-boyfriend is mass murderer

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Wired.com has an interesting scoop in the Hans Reiser case. Reiser's disappeared wife, the one Hans is charged with murdering, had a boyfriend after she split with Hans. This boyfriend, Sean Sturgeon, has admitted to killing eight people. But he denies killing Nina. The case keeps getting weirder and weirder. But this is good news for Hans. The story is at http://www.wired.com/politics/law/news/2007/05/rei ser"
Linux Business

+ - OpenOffice + Linux = Crap

Submitted by ramboando
ramboando (1057132) writes "Open Kernel Labs founder Professor Gernot Heiser had some blunt words for the OpenOffice community — the product isn't ready to compete with the big boys. In this story, he says: "If you want to be successful in open source it can't just be a 'me too' product. Anything that's not the best technology will not work ... enterprise is willing to pay for the best. OpenOffice is not the best ... it's the first thing that made me move from Linux to Mac," Heiser said. "Open source is creating the most pure Darwinist environment possible. It's brutal survival of the fittest," he said, surprising the crowd at CeBIT's Open Source Business session today. "Only the best software will be able to survive. Regardless of how free it is, enterprise will not use it unless it is better," Heiser added. Sun's Simon Phipps basically said he was talking crap."
Windows

+ - Windows Uptime Maximum 3 Months

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Ever see the Windows vs Linux uptime graphs? I think NetCraft has some really good ones comparing Apache and IIS web-servers. Well they're the most inaccurate measurement of uptime available to mankind and should be completely ignored when comparing uptime propensity of a particular operation system. The reason? Microsoft forces you to reboot your server after applying security updates. So if we say Microsoft releases a critical update 4 times a year, we can conclude that the average uptime of a Microsoft server is 3 months. Pretty quick and easy math. No graphs needed here. What do you think should be a proper measurement of uptime? Is Microsoft guilty of falsely advertising their products as reliable? Could that be grounds for misrepresentation?"
KDE

+ - Dolphin all set to be included in KDE4

Submitted by
b1ufox
b1ufox writes "ArsTechnica carries an article on Dolphin, the new file manager which will debut with much awaited KDE4.The screenshot definitely looks promising.As dolphin will be the default file manager for KDE4, it certainly does not mean Konqueror has been displace.Knoqueror is still one of the most advanced file managers out there, among the FOSS community. More at http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20070405-afir st-look-at-dolphin-the-kde-4-file-manager.html"
Microsoft

+ - Microsoft kills off J# language

Submitted by
twofish
twofish writes "Microsoft have announced that J#, its Java clone for .NET, and the Java Language Conversion Assistant will be discontinued and will not appear in the next version of Visual Studio. At the same time they have announced pans for a 64-bit version of the J# Redistributable this year."

Numeric stability is probably not all that important when you're guessing.

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