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Comment: You're more spot-on than you can imagine (Score 1) 715

by Qbertino (#47564883) Attached to: Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

Even god almighty couldn't make Italian transit work, Mussolini never stood a chance.

The italians couldn't even manage to invade greece once the war started. Hitler had to send troops to help out and they ended up doing most of the work (no joke). Anecdotes say he was fuming, that with allies like Italy no one needed enemies. As WW2 goes, The Third Reich would've probably actually errm ... 'done better' (pardon my choice of words) without Italy as an ally.
If you want a project to fail, give it to italians, I guess. :-)

Comment: Re:Exploited procedural loophole (Score 1) 393

by Cyberdyne (#47559675) Attached to: A 24-Year-Old Scammed Apple 42 Times In 16 Different States

The two times I've had in-store card referrals (high value transactions: the first time was buying a P3 laptop, which was quite high end in those days; the second was furnishing a new apartment after moving to Houston), I'm pretty sure it was the issuing bank ultimately handling the call - I can't imagine the bank would have transferred the personal information they were asking for as a security check to the merchant services provider: past unlisted contact details, previous transactions etc. I suspect the call may have been transferred to them, though, rather than called directly.

I had a similar issue this year with British Telecom working on a broadband fault. The service manager wanted to speak directly to the field engineer working on the fault (different divisions: the engineer's BT Openreach, the manager was BT Wholesale) - but the Openreach guy said he couldn't call the Wholesale one directly. So, the Wholesale one called my number and asked to speak to him ...

Comment: shift of blame. (Score 1) 393

by Cyberdyne (#47559595) Attached to: A 24-Year-Old Scammed Apple 42 Times In 16 Different States

it is the retailer who is supposed to make the call to the financial institution on the retailer's own phone line

To be fair, the Apple Store staff tried phoning on their own iPhones first, but none of them could figure out how to hold it to get a signal, so they had to borrow the customer's phone instead...

User Journal

Journal: Chronicle: Apartment: Carpet complaints 1

Journal by Chacham

My apartment has carpet save the kitchen that has tile. When i moved in, i was given a checklist to note what was not perfect. Figuring that's what they would fix, i verbally mentioned the cracks in the kitchen floor and perhaps something else, and moved on. I really had no idea what the checklist was for. Besides, it looked daunting.

+ - Ask Slashdot: Open Hard- & Software based Security Token Thingie?

Submitted by Qbertino
Qbertino (265505) writes "Hoi Slashdotters. I'm just musing about a security setup to allow my coworkers/users access to files from the outside. I want security to be a little safer than pure key or PW based SSH access and some super-expensive RSA Token Setup is out of question, so I've been wondering if there are any feasible and working FOSS and open hardware based security token generator projects out there? Best with readymade server-side scripts/daemons.
Perhaps something arduino or rasberry pi based or something? Has anybody tried something like this? What are your experiences? What do you use? How would you attempt an open hardware FOSS solution to this problem? Discuss! And thanks for any input."

Comment: Re:So what? (Score -1) 229

by jawtheshark (#47556065) Attached to: Free Copy of the Sims 2 Contains SecuROM
Look to play it, you must run Windows, to run Windows means that you almost certainly have malware already. To me that makes it a non issue. Want to game? Have a Windows partition for that specifically and consider it "nukable-from-orbit". Do important stuff on sane platforms. That's how I see it, and as such, SecuROM is no big deal, even with the rather overblown claims of it being malware. It might be, and if it is, it's still no big deal as you isolate it from important things. At least slashdotters should, and normal people have malware regardless.

Comment: Re:So what? (Score 0, Troll) 229

by jawtheshark (#47555899) Attached to: Free Copy of the Sims 2 Contains SecuROM
Yes, I don't get this. They give a game away for free and instead of saying "Fun! Thank you EA" many people are complaining about the DRM. Yes, there is DRM, but you're running Windows to play it, so that really is the least of your problems. I grabbed it. I don't even have Windows in active use, but should I ever have tons of free spare time and want to play a game, I can now install it on a Games-Dedicated-Windows partition.

I say "Thank you EA".

Comment: Re:Elop (Score 1) 149

by miffo.swe (#47548963) Attached to: Microsoft's Nokia Plans Come Into Better Focus

I am just as amazed as you are. That many of us at Slashdot could predict exactly how it would play out was a nice discovery. I also fail to grasp how it is possible to so blatantly dismantle and kill a competitor by a mole without so much as a single lawsuit. And considering this is not the first company Microsoft killed and maimed killing one as large and successful as Nokia without repercussions makes you think dirty money must have changed hands. Either the board was full of drunken Finns oblivious of what was happening or they got paid to shut up and kick the share holders in the groin.

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