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Comment: Security should be an Enabler (Score 0) 582

by Yousef (#39170403) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Dealing With University Firewalls?

Among the key aspects of security that many none security techies (control-freaks and politicians) miss is the fact that Security is supposed to be an enabler. It isn't supposed to get in the way of business.
Aside from legal and compliance matters, security should never get in the way of day-to-day operations.
The business of a University of LEARNING. Internet is a vital and essential part of learning - draconian restrictions will never help security.

The "IT Guy" obviously hasn't segmented his network; nor has he done a threat assessment, risk assessment or analyzed the business requirements of Internet in a University!
When your "security" policy/procedures force users to work around, bypass, hack; then that security policy has FAILED.

At my old university, (1998), we got our useless IT Administrator sacked when the students and staff got together and made the case to the University Administrators (it was a fun meeting :-)). Unfortunately, University Administrators think they are running a prison, not an educational institute; however, they can't fight against the teachers and students! ;-)
FIGHT DA POWA!

Comment: A tough choice... (Score 1) 633

by Yousef (#34716510) Attached to: Trek Tech That Most Needs To Be Invented Before I Die:

I chose Holodeck simply because I love gaming and this would be the ultimate (short of the Matrix; where if you die in the Matrix you die in the real world; which kinda sux) immersive gaming experience - it would also make for TRUE 3-D movies... not the crap we currently endure.

However, a large part of me would prefer the Transporter just to avoid the f***in TSA!

The Military

Mock Cyber Attack Shows US Unpreparedness 148

Posted by timothy
from the sir-we've-lost-amazon dept.
An anonymous reader writes with word that the outcome of the large-scale cyberattack simulation promised a few days ago isn't too rosy. From the Help Net Security article: "During the simulated cyber attack that took place yesterday in Washington and was recorded by CNN, one thing became clear: the US are still not ready to deflect or mitigate such an attack to an extent that would not affect considerably the everyday life of its citizens. The ballroom of the Washington's Mandarin Oriental Hotel was for this event transformed into the White House Situation Room, complete with three video screens displaying maps of the country, simulated updates and broadcasts by 'GNN,' an imaginary television network 'covering' the crisis."
Businesses

UK Consumers To Pay For Online Piracy 300

Posted by samzenpus
from the music-rolls-down-hill dept.
Wowsers writes "An article in The Times states that UK consumers will be hit with an estimated £500m ($800m US) bill to tackle online piracy. The record and film industries have managed to convince the government to get consumers to pay for their perceived losses. Meanwhile they have refused to move with the times, and change their business models. Other businesses have adapted and been successful, but the film and record industries refuse to do so. Surely they should not add another stealth tax to all consumers."
Books

Alternative 2009 Copyright Expirations 427

Posted by kdawson
from the world-of-what-if dept.
jrincayc writes "It's nearly the end of 2009. If the 1790 copyright maximum term of 28 years was still in effect, everything that had been published by 1981 would be now be in the public domain — like the original Ultima and God Emperor of Dune — and would be available for remixing and mashing up. If the 1909 copyright maximum term of 56 years (if renewed) were still in force, everything published by 1953 would now be in the public domain, freeing The City and the Stars and Forbidden Planet. If the 1976 copyright act term of 75* years (* it's complicated) still applied, everything published by 1934 would now be in the public domain, including Murder on the Orient Express. But thanks to the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act, nothing in the US will go free until 2018, when 1923 works expire." Assuming Congress doesn't step in with a Copyright Extension Act of 2017. What are the odds?
Privacy

In the UK, Big Brother Recedes and Advances 176

Posted by kdawson
from the now-get-rid-of-the-damn-cameras dept.
PeterAitch writes "The UK government's Home Office has put a hold on their surveillance project to track details of everybody's email, mobile phone, text, and Web use after being warned of problems with privacy as well as technical feasibility and high costs." Four hours before the above Guardian story was filed, the BBC reported that the same Home Office insisted that it will push ahead with plans "to compel communication service providers to collect and retain records of communications from a wider range of internet sources, from social networks through to chatrooms and unorthodox methods, such as within online games."
Power

The Risks and Rewards of Warmer Data Centers 170

Posted by samzenpus
from the not-so-chilly dept.
1sockchuck writes "The risks and rewards of raising the temperature in the data center were debated last week in several new studies based on real-world testing in Silicon Valley facilities. The verdict: companies can indeed save big money on power costs by running warmer. Cisco Systems expects to save $2 million a year by raising the temperature in its San Jose research labs. But nudge the thermostat too high, and the energy savings can evaporate in a flurry of server fan activity. The new studies added some practical guidance on a trend that has become a hot topic as companies focus on rising power bills in the data center."
Media

Disney Close To Unveiling New "DVD Killer" 498

Posted by timothy
from the plays-for-sure dept.
Uncle Rummy writes "The Wall Street Journal reports that Disney is close to releasing a new system that will sell permanent, multi-device access to digital media. The system, dubbed Keychest, is being positioned as an answer to consumer concerns about purchasing digital media that are locked to a small number of devices, and thus as a way to finally shift media sales from an ownership model to an access model. They claim that such a service would reduce the risk of losing access to content as a result of a single vendor going out of business, as purchased content would remain available from other vendors. However, they do not seem to have addressed the question of what happens to customers' access to purchased content if the Keychest service itself is discontinued."
Cellphones

Nokia Fears Carriers May Try To Undermine N900 307

Posted by Soulskill
from the but-the-carriers-are-usually-so-helpful dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Nokia is worried that networks may reject selling the N900 because it won't allow them to mess with the operating system. Nokia has previously showed the N900 running a root shell and it appears to use the same interface for IM and phone functions. Meanwhile, Verizon is claiming that 'exclusivity arrangements promote competition and innovation.' Is it too late to explain to people why $99+$60/month is not better than $600+$20/month?"
Privacy

Skype Trojan Can Log VoIP Conversations 151

Posted by timothy
from the sans-malice-would-be-a-useful-thing dept.
Slatterz writes "Security giant Symantec claims to have found the public release of source code for a Trojan that targets Skype users. Trojan.Peskyspy is spyware which records a voice call and stores it as an MP3 file for later transmission. An infected machine will use the software that handles audio processing within a computer and save the call data as an MP3. The file is then sent over the internet to a predefined server where the attacker can listen to the recorded conversations."

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