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Comment: Re:haha (Score 1) 114

Statement from Attorney General Jim Hood/a>

Mr. Hood's letter is so cynical I just can't get my head around it. He has been caught red handed accepting bribes from the MPAA and what does he conclude?

"The Sony emails themselves document that long before the hack many attorneys general were working to make our states safer for our children. It would be a discredit to the public interest not to question Google's actions and consider the consequences."

Think of the children. It's all about the children! That is what Mr. Hood would have us believe. That is just so disingenuous that he loses any shred of credibility.

In fact, his entire statement follows in this vein. He only makes a single reference to intellectual property in passing, and the entire blog is focused on blaming Google for promoting all the ills of our society for their own enrichment.

To paraphrase Mr. Hood, It would be a discredit to the public interest not to question MPAA's actions and consider the consequences.

In fact, the Sony emails document a collusion of the MPAA with the state attorneys to subvert the laws of the nation. All these areas are governed by federal law. The state attorneys should simply pass their concerns on to Congress, and get back to dealing with issues that fall squarely within their jurisdiction.

Mr. Hood dismisses the MPAA's corrupting the agenda of the state attorneys is just a "a salacious Hollywood tale"? No, this is very real, and a very serious issue. Don't those state attorneys have more important things to deal with than the MPAA's agenda? The CID the state attorney launched was according to a plan hatched by the MPAA, and not about the children at all. Just a shakedown in attempt to force Google to do the MPAA's bidding.

"some of its more excitable people have sued trying to stop the State of Mississippi for daring to ask some questions."

What in the heck is that supposed to mean - "some of its more excitable people"? There was nothing in that sentence to even match the pronoun (some of its) . Talk about excited people, Mr. Hood is so excited that he is spouting gibberish. The state attorneys collusion with the MPAA has been exposed and "excitable people" have sued? This is a very serious issue. Google is reacting to mafia-like shakedown in a very calm and rational way. If this happened to me I would go berserk. "daring to ask some questions" These weren't just some questions. They were a shocking overreach, open-ended questions that were unanswerable because they didn't even make any sense.

.

"I am calling a time out, so that cooler heads may prevail."

What an astonishing thing to say. What is Mr. Hood trying to imply with this statement? That Google's lawyers are hot-heads for filling for an injunction against this shakedown? Mr. Hood is calling a time out because he has been exposed. Well clearly he needs one. He needs time to consult with his MPAA friends to plan a strategy as to how to shape this in the press. He certainly isn't handling it very well so far.

"I will reach out to legal counsel Google's board of directors to negotiate a peaceful resolution to the issues affecting consumers that we attorneys general have pointed out in a series of eight letters to Google."

A peaceful resolution: Is he saying he is going to back off and apologize? I certainly hope so.

Comment: Re:Good (Score 1) 586

by TropicalCoder (#48623319) Attached to: Top Five Theaters Won't Show "The Interview" Sony Cancels Release
Did you like these guys, Bin Laden and Hussein? Would you have prefered they got a trial and a court appointed lawyer if they couldn't have afforded one? As a matter of fact, Hussein did get a trial as I recall. Only Bin Laden didn't. Was that a miscarriage of justice do you think?

Comment: Update2 (Score 1) 586

by TropicalCoder (#48622365) Attached to: Top Five Theaters Won't Show "The Interview" Sony Cancels Release

U.S. investigators have determined hackers working for North Korea were behind the Sony attack, and an announcement could come as soon as Thursday, U.S. law enforcement sources tell CNN's Evan Perez.

Because of the North Korean regime's tight control of the Internet in the reclusive country, U.S. officials believe the hack was ordered directly by the nation's leadership.

The hackers have exposed documents from Sony's servers, including personal information about celebrities and embarrassing emails from executives. They also said that people should avoid going to theaters to see "The Interview," which is about an attempt to kill North Korea's leader.

Sony on Wednesday canceled the film's December 25 release.

Get complete coverage of breaking news on CNN TV, CNN.com and CNN Mobile.

Comment: Re:Good (Score 4, Funny) 586

by TropicalCoder (#48622265) Attached to: Top Five Theaters Won't Show "The Interview" Sony Cancels Release

I almost pity the fools that made their veiled threat behind the keyboards...they will pay.

And I am always thinking that the FBI must know a lot more than they let on. Just think of all the resources the NSA has to track this down - taps into every internet trunk line in the world. Surely they can follow the trail to the perpetrators, and deliver a punishment to fit the crime in their own time. They may never even tell us about it, but somewhere, someday, some people will mysteriously meet up with a premature death. For sure the US Gov has an interest in this, above and beyond what they would have in hacks of Target & Home Depot, because the unique wanton destructiveness of the hack and the terrorists threats.

The more cordial the buyer's secretary, the greater the odds that the competition already has the order.

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