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Comment: My sense (Score 1) 536

My sense is that the MEAN Stack (Mongo, Express, AngularJS, Node) is sort of winning. There's some packaging of it over at mean.io.

Personally, I'm really getting interested in Meteor (www.meteor.com). Watch the videos, and realize I saw a smart non-coder go from zero to *ridiculously* interactive site design in three months.

+ - Money and wealth: clearing up some serious misconceptions-> 2

Submitted by KDan
KDan (90353) writes "I am not an economist. However, most people misunderstand money and its purposes and uses so badly that I feel compelled to write out my understanding of it. Perhaps because I am not an economist, this might help some. The first and perhaps most important mistake people make is to confuse money for wealth. The more I earn, the more I realise that wealth is not money, but the ability to generate money (and other things of value). This is akin to the difference between saying "I am a dancer" (i.e. I have the ability to dance) and "I was a dancer" (i.e. I once had it but I no longer have it). Being wealthy is equivalent to the first statement, while having money is equivalent to the second."
Link to Original Source

Comment: It's because Python 3 is broken. (Score 2) 432

by Effugas (#45911963) Attached to: Why Do Projects Continue To Support Old Python Releases?
No really.

I took a pass at Python 3 a while back. The amount of hoops I needed to jump through, to deal with compilation errors around Unicode handling, was terrifying. It was simply a poor user experience.

Python 2.7 just works. Sure, it's a nightmare past a certain scale point. But until you get into the dregs of OO it really is executable pseudocode.

Python 3 is some other language that lost that property.

The big problem is that we don't ship languages with telemetry that reports when they fail to work. So things that are completely obvious to outsiders never make it to inner circles. Not that I can really see any way for Python 3 to mend its errors.

Comment: Write code! (Score 3, Informative) 472

by Effugas (#44107671) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Getting Hired As a Self-Taught Old Guy?
Seriously. Write some code, publish it on Github. Spin up a single serving web page, does one interesting thing as soon as you arrive. Remember, everyone else with resumes could be pretending, you're actually doing stuff.

For work experience, sign up on freelancing sites like odesk. Take jobs just to do them. Nobody knows how old you are, there. Even if all you can do is sysadmin -- well, admin some cloud services!

Comment: Perspective (Score 5, Insightful) 438

by Effugas (#38969295) Attached to: The iPhone Is a Nightmare For Carriers
http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/2012/01/82-percent-of-atts-q4-2011-sales-are-smartphones-66-percent-are-iphones.ars

Yeah. 66% of AT&T's 4th quarter sales were iPhones. I was on Verizon for years, switched to AT&T only for their iPhone, and stuck with them only for their GSM capabilities worldwide. Sure, your margins are less when you offer a better service. Would you prefer no sales though?

Comment: NES (Score 2) 348

by Effugas (#38962275) Attached to: Should Next-Gen Game Consoles Be Upgradeable?
The platform that most successfully upgraded itself was the NES. One of the degrees of freedom they had, because there were chips in each cartridge, was to deploy new memory management units inside the games themselves. Quite literally, the NES became more powerful for games released later in its dev cycle. SNES did this too, with the SuperFX chip inside of Starfox (the most popular DSP in the world, for its era) but it wasn't quite the "all games ship upgrading hardware".

I suspect if there was ever to be upgradable hardware, it'd have to work by yearly subscription, and it'd have to be no more than $50 a year for the part. However, with guaranteed sales in the millions of units (as games would hard-require it) the logistics of making some pretty crazy stuff fit into $50/yr wouldn't be unimaginable. Remember that XBox Live is already pulling, what, $60/yr?
User Journal

Journal: Wanted: very much! 1

Journal by andr0meda

It's nearly the end of the year. I noticed I average about a post a year now on this once so fantastic news site that I barely check up on these days. I haven't seen the oodles of good posts that whooshed by, nor have I seen the inventive new types of trolls that lurked here since when I was in University. That's a perplexing 10 years ago by now.

+ - Victory for music locker services?->

Submitted by
Gaygirlie
Gaygirlie writes "Michael Robertson, the owner and founder of the MP3Tunes music locker service, has been locked in a copyright infringement case with EMI Records for a while now, especially because of the Sideloading search engine that is tacked along with the locker service. Now the case has been resolved though: EMI Records won. But lost on all the accounts that actually really matter.

Michael Robertson is a man known to not shy away from legal fights and is known to always be seeking new boundaries to push. He founded the MP3Tunes service in 2005 with mostly the money he gained from running Linspire back in the day."

Link to Original Source
Open Source

+ - Under the Hood in Apache Lucene 4.0->

Submitted by Thinkcloud
Thinkcloud (1901664) writes "Once the decision to break backward compatibility in Lucene 4.0 had been made, it opened the floodgates on a host of step changes, which, together, will deliver a product whose performance is unrecognisable from previous 3.x releases. An interview with Simon Willnauer, PMC Chair of Apache Lucene."
Link to Original Source

Comment: It's all being worked on (Score 5, Interesting) 77

by Effugas (#34618434) Attached to: The DNSSEC Chicken & Egg Challenge
DNSSEC is an infrastructure shift, and you can't use it on .com domains for another few months. Have some patience.

At Black Hat this year, I actually demonstrated the endgame. Want federated authentication in OpenSSH that actually scales? Want servers able to autogenerate TLS keys that will be recognized and secured worldwide, even against broken certificate authorities?

Want secure email, without the mess that is PGP key management?

End to end secure key management via DNSSEC makes it all actually really easy. Code is here -- BSD licensed, feel free to play:

http://dankaminsky.com/phreebird

Also, I'm putting together a set of diaries on the subject:

http://dankaminsky.com/2010/12/13/dnssec-ch1/

Enjoy!

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