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Ask Slashdot: Are Daily Stand-Up Meetings More Productive? 445

__roo writes "The Wall Street Journal reports that an increasing number of companies are replacing traditional meetings with daily stand-ups. The article points out that stand-up meetings date back to at least World War I, and that in some place, late employees 'sometimes must sing a song like "I'm a Little Teapot," do a lap around the office building or pay a small fine.' Do Slashdot readers feel that stand-up meetings are useful? Do they make a difference? Are they a gimmick?"

Comment Once upon a time in the south... (Score 1) 242

Once, while on a hike in the southern part of the Appalachian Trail, I met a local fellow who was kind enough to give me a ride to a nearby town to do some resupply. He drove a small non nondescript car that had six or eight pieces of electronics mounted in the front. Several were scanners tuned to the Forest Service, County Police, State Police and other law enforcement agencies. And a CB radio to talk to his friends. As we drove along, he spotted several forest service crews and knew all of their names, what they did and their schedules. He waited while I did my business and drove me back to the trail crossing. Later that night, he showed up at the shelter I had stopped at with a few of his friends, all a bit intoxicated. He said they had thought of me and had brought a mason jar of local produce for me. I declined the gift, since I don't drink, but we talked a while. They were in a real talkative mood. Turns out they ran a distilling operating on National Forrest land and use the scanners to track law enforcement whenever they seem to be interested in them. He said the equipment was more for avoiding mutual embarrassment since law enforcement was not really interested in small scale producers of untaxed alcohol. Just a bunch of good old boys.

Comment Re:Opt out (Score 1) 198

Short Pump mall is in Henrico County, Va, home of the world's greatest Used MacBook distributer. Last night, the local Richmond news broadcasts mentioned the tracking and the opt out method. I doubt anyone paid much attention to this.

To my mind, a better method of dealing with this would be transmitters that feed false data to the system, poisoning the data set, or if several are used, launching a DOS attack. After all, it is better to give than receive. I will add that there are four malls there that are contiguous and tracking traffic will be rather difficult and (imho) pointless.

Comment Re:Brainstorm ways to screw with the data (Score 1) 198

There is probably nothing funnier than a bunch of ferrets chasing a RC car. We have three ferrets and they will gang up on the car and follow it everywhere it goes. They go into a full ferret frenzy and try to "attack" the car, considering it to be prey. The thought of that happening in a mall is a real mind blower.

Comment Western Henrico County, V a. (Score 1) 614

About 40 miles from Mineral. Home to the world's greatest Used IBook distributor.

Wife and I were taking an afternoon nap. Building starts vibrating and rattling.

Asked the wife (california girl) Earthquake?

"Yes, do you have them here?"

She didn't want to hear about Virginia seismologic happenings or the thermally active areas in the state. She just went back to sleep.

I got up and googled for info, which was abundantly available, then turned on the TV. The local channels were into full info mode and went on for hours about the quake. Various politicians and other vultures put in their expected appearances and offered mostly uniformed opinions. The worst consequence seems to have been the early let off of all government workers in DC which jammed transportation in NVa.

The most difficult thing in the world is to know how to do a thing and to watch someone else doing it wrong, without commenting. -- T.H. White

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