Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re: Our Children's Children's Children Will Save U (Score 1) 266

by Tracy Reed (#44002561) Attached to: Decommissioning San Onofre Nuclear Plant May Take Decades

The radiator in the car requires a pump and, of course, a radiator. I think evaporative cooling (the current method) is the best way to go. If you seal it and pump it you must have the pump working and airflow over the radiator at all times. It is more complicated.

Comment: Re:Our Children's Children's Children Will Save Us (Score 1) 266

by Tracy Reed (#44002545) Attached to: Decommissioning San Onofre Nuclear Plant May Take Decades

Are you talking about San Onofre here? I live within tens of miles of it. The fuel is currently NOT removed. In fact there are 4 decades worth of spent fuel sitting in pools at the site. And it will remain there indefinitely until we figure out another place to store it OR pull our heads out of our asses and reprocess and recycle this fuel. Letting such a valuable commodity sit there is just silly.

Even though I live nearby the thing I am disappointed they are giving up on it. Looks like we're in for another summer of rolling blackouts in SoCal.

Comment: Custom ear molds (Score 1) 104

by Tracy Reed (#42570333) Attached to: Making Earbuds That Fit (Video)

My job requires me to spend a lot of time with stuff in my ears: Headsets, earbuds for music, bluetooth for phone calls... They would always fall out or not isolate well. Then I found out about custom ear molds. You go to an audiologist (same guy who makes hearing aids) and they put this putty like stuff in your ear which hardens after a couple minutes and takes an impression of the ear canal and area just outside your ear. Then you send that impression off to a place that makes custom ear molds and you tell them what device you are going to be attaching it to.

I highly recommend Avery Sound: http://www.averysound.com/.

I have no financial interest in them, I'm just a very sastisfied customer. I have their custom ear molds on my Etymotic ear buds for music, on my Clarity Aloft aviation headset, and on my Jawbone Prime bluetooth headset. Perfect fit, great isolation, and have never once fallen out of my ear due to the way they lock-in by following every curve of the ear.

My only complaints about them might be that I have accidentally pulled the earmolds off my Etymotic earbuds a few times while listening to music because the low surface area of the part of the earbud that sticks into the earmold doesn't leave much to grab onto. But my Jawbone and Aloft are stuck on there very solidly. The Etymotic earmold is also probably the least well fitting of the three although it still fits very good. It's just that if I swallow hard or chew it breaks the airtight seal with the outside (which is what gives the awesome noise isolation coming in and music isolation going out) which causes a popping noise. A very minor thing, really. But that's how good these things are.

I'll never use standard non-molded earbuds again.

Comment: IS your code bad? (Score 1) 507

by Tracy Reed (#42551377) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How To React To Coworker Who Says My Code Is Bad?

I have noticed that whenever I see people approached with comments about the quality of their code (by myself or others) they often say things like "You just don't understand what this code is supposed to be doing."

That is always a red-flag to me. If your code is good the person should be able to tell what the code is doing.

What are this person's specific objections to your code?

There are no absolutes or hard rules and much is subjective and language dependent but as general rules of thumb:

Does your organization have a style guide? Does your code follow it?

Does your code have comments? I like to see at least one comment per functional block of code (function, loop, branch, new level of indent, whatever, depending on language).

Are the lengths of your function limited to no more than a page of text, preferably half a page?

Do your line lengths not exceed 80 columns?

Do you make some effort at making the code visually nice to look at? Is it formatted so like elements line up for easy comparison of lines? I'm a big fan of lining up = and parens etc. to make the code look orderly. It makes it easy to spot differences or errors. It sounds shallow but I also find that when someone has done this it means they care.

Without seeing a sample of your code to tell you if it IS bad there's no way we can advise you. If all you want is a polite way to tell the little twerp to shut up and mind his own business that won't get you fired I'm afraid I don't have much to offer.

Comment: ROP & The Halting Problem (Score 2) 111

by Tracy Reed (#41203661) Attached to: Frankenstein Code Stitches Code Bodies Together To Hide Malware

This sounds like Return Oriented Programming, used in some exploits to thwart countermeasures. But it is a long way from stitching together code to do trivial things all the way to making code which replicates, has a payload, AND can stitch together code to do all Of this. The Halting Problem makes me wonder if it is even theoretically possible.

Comment: Homeopathy (Score 1) 239

by Tracy Reed (#40960855) Attached to: Beware the Nocebo Effect

> In one remarkable case, a participant in an antidepressant drug trial was given placebo tablets — and then swallowed 26 of them in a suicide attempt.

This reminds me of the James Randi talk on homeopathy: Part of the theory of homeopathy is that the more dilute the solution is the stronger it is. Randi told the hypothetical story of someone who forgot to take his "medicine" thus causing an overdose and DIED.

Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from a rigged demo.

Working...