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Comment: It didn't even have to be technical (Score 1) 135

by Tearfang (#48356823) Attached to: Tor Project Mulls How Feds Took Down Hidden Websites
It is also possible that after the identified Dread Pirate Roberts of Silk Road 1.0 they traced a connection from him to the Silk Road 2.0 DPR says that only he knew the identity... but when did he set it up how often did they communicate and did he leave any trace?

I never believed the story of how DPR was originally identified. It is standard practice for intelligence agencies and sometimes police to hide their sources through parallel construction. They really find something out one way- then, after the fact, figure out all the ways they could plausibly have gotten the same information and say that is how they got the information. To make it more believable they can actually run the script and gather the info a second time in a manner that doesn't reveal their sources.

Comment: Nukes have already been used (Score 1) 176

by Tearfang (#48355781) Attached to: The Disgruntled Guys Who Babysit Our Aging Nuclear Missiles
//We all know nuclear weapons will never get used//

Historically that is not true.
The 1st nukes developed were developed by the US, the 1st thing they did with them was use them on Japan. Perhaps you meant it as a statement of hope about the future... I hope you are right, but there is a whole lot of future. The smart money is on them being used again at some point. Can't possibly imagine a scenario when someone might use them again? Let me help out the lack of imagination: say someone is stupid enough to pick a big fight with a country that has them thinking that they'll never use them.. or a country that has them finds itself in a war with a powerful military that doesn't have them- or a civil war breaks out and one faction has control of the nukes and fill in the blank. Nukes probably will be used again and it probably won't be the end of the world as we know it, but it could.

Comment: They didn't control for network connection (Score 1) 127

by Tearfang (#47610203) Attached to: T-Mobile Smartphones Outlast Competitors' Identical Models
From the article “make sure that it’s receiving at least 3 bars of service” The words “at least” worry me here. That seems to imply some had 3 bars and some had 5. Since signal strength is often tied to network speed and how much power the radio needs to communicate with the towers this alone makes the results suspect. A carrier with 5 bars is going to have a huge advantage over one with 3. Maybe they misspoke and really they all had the same number of bars... even then I'd think they'd have to run a speed test as well since those bars are phone service bars not 3G/4G/LTE/whatever bars.
Image

Julian Assange's Online Dating Profile Leaked 334

Posted by samzenpus
from the leaker-love dept.
Ponca City writes "The Telegraph reports that an online dating profile created by Julian Assange in 2006 has been unearthed from OKCupid disclosing that the WikiLeaks editor sought 'spirited, erotic' women 'from countries that have sustained political turmoil.' Writing under the pseudonym of British science fiction author Harry Harrison, Assange described himself as a 'passionate, and often pig headed activist intellectual.' Assange said he was seeking a 'siren for [a] love affair, children and occasional criminal conspiracy' adding that he was 'directing a consuming, dangerous human rights project which is, as you might expect, male dominated' and added enigmatically: 'I am DANGER, ACHTUNG.' Among Assange's listed interests were the 'structure of reality' and 'chopping up human brains' – although he added the caveat '(neuroscience background)' lest the latter put off potential admirers. 'I like women from countries that have sustained political turmoil,' Assange wrote. 'Western culture seems to forge women that are valueless and inane. OK. Not only women!'"
Microsoft

The Software That Failed To Compete With Windows 347

Posted by kdawson
from the rear-view-mirror-of-history dept.
harrymcc writes "When Microsoft shipped Windows 1.0 back in November 1985 — it turned 25 on Saturday — it wasn't clear that its much-delayed windowing add-on for DOS was going to succeed. After all, it was a late arrival to a market that was already teeming with ambitious competitors. A quarter-century later, it's worth remembering the early Windows rivals that didn't make it: Visi On, Top View, GEM, DESQview, and more."
Sun Microsystems

Running ZFS Natively On Linux Slower Than Btrfs 235

Posted by kdawson
from the early-days dept.
An anonymous reader writes "It's been known that ZFS is coming to Linux in the form of a native kernel module done by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and KQ Infotech. The ZFS module is still in closed testing on KQ infotech's side (but LLNL's ZFS code is publicly available), and now Phoronix has tried out the ZFS file-system on Linux and carried out some tests. ZFS on Linux via this native module is much faster than using ZFS-FUSE, but the Solaris file-system in most areas is not nearly as fast as EXT4, Btrfs, or XFS."
Censorship

The State of Iran's Ongoing Netwar 263

Posted by timothy
from the nineties-is-way-late-for-gibson-sterling-et-al dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Following disputed elections in Iran, opposition groups and activists have turned conventional protests into a major threat to the ruling government. The low-intensity protest movement is rapidly becoming the first true netwar of the 21st century. Opposition protesters have shown that within a few hours or less, the information technologies that are the mainstay of modern society can become its weapons, as well. This article examines the current situation in Iran and the part played by new media technologies and strategies, showing how far the theory and practice of netwar has advanced since the concept first emerged in the late nineties."
Transportation

Ford To Introduce Restrictive Car Keys For Parents 1224

Posted by kdawson
from the no-you-cannot-borrow-my-keys dept.
thesandbender writes "Ford is set to release a management system that will restrict certain aspects of a car's performance based on which key is in the ignition. The speed is limited to 80, you can't turn off traction control, and you can't turn the stereo up to eleven. It's targeted at parents of teenagers and seems like a generally good idea, especially if you get a break on your insurance." The keys will be introduced with the 2010 Focus coupe and will quickly spread to Ford's entire lineup.
Biotech

Virtual Fence Could Modernize the Old West 216

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the too-strange-for-a-topic-icon dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "For more than a century, ranchers in the West have kept cattle in place with fences of barbed wire, split wood and, more recently, electrified wires. Now, animal science researchers with the Department of Agriculture are working on a system that will allow cowboys to herd their cattle remotely via radio by singing commands and whispering into their ears and tracking movements by satellite and computer. A video of Dean Anderson, a researcher at the USDA's Jornada Experimental Range at Las Cruces, NM., shows how he has built radios that attach to an animal's head that allow a person at the other end to issue a range of commands — gentle singing, sharp commands, or a buzz like a bee or snake — to get the cattle to move where one wants them to. Anderson says it would cost $900 today to put a radio device on one head of cattle, but he says costs will fall and the entire herd wouldn't have to be outfitted, just the 'leaders.' Much of the research has focused on how cattlemen can identify which cattle in their herds are the ones that the others follow."

Comment: Re:Believe it or not it's illegal (Score 1, Informative) 740

by Tearfang (#15788454) Attached to: Investing Tips for College Students?
Yes I read the post, and he is investing the loan.

Follow me here.
Say I earn $1,000 dollars a month and that I also spend $1,000 a month. If someone gives me $1,000 dollars and a month I subsequently spend $1,000 on non-living expenses then which $1,000 dollars did I spend; the $1,000 I earn or the $1,000 given to me. Get my point? The correct answer is the $1,000 dollars given to me. It doesnt which $1,000 dollars I purport to have spent nor does it matter which physical bills I used. The fact or the matter is that if I had not been given the $1,000 I wouldnt have been able to spend $1,000 dollars on non-living expenses.

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