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Wired To Block Ad-Blocking Users, Offer Subscription (wired.com) 314

AmiMoJo writes: In a blog post Wired has announced that it will begin to block users who block ads on its site: "On an average day, more than 20 percent of the traffic to WIRED.com comes from a reader who is blocking our ads. We know that you come to our site primarily to read our content, but it's important to be clear that advertising is how we keep WIRED going," wrote the editors. The post goes on to offer two options for users blocking ads: whitelist wired.com or subscribe for $1/week.

Comment Re:News that Matters????? (Score 1) 29

I suspect that Instagram simply realizes that 'different accounts' is a security/visibility-control model that people find easier and more familiar than various sorts of filters/tags/groups/'friends only'/etc. It's not as though they will have much difficulty correlating a user's accounts(even if the app doesn't explicitly send them 'all usernames on this device', seeing logins to certain accounts from a specific device is a pretty big clue); but switching accounts is easier than futzing with security settings when trying to maintain distinct audiences.

Comment I've seen nothing but Bizarro World from them (Score 1) 38

Bush and Christie hitting one-time Senator Rubio out on lack of experience when Bush's Texas governor brother took the white house in peacetime with a balanced budget and in a boom and left with two wars, the worst economy since the Great Depression, and history's largest deficit. Then a one term Illinois Senator took that and is leaving office with low unemployment, a lower deficit, and a good economy. They're nuts.

Not that Rubio is any more sane.

Comment Re:Relativism (Score 2) 230

What has this got to do with video games? Who knows? But we must understand that this generation is one of the most mentally fucked up generations to have ever walked the face of the earth. So, saying 90's vido gamers turned out 'ok', is clearly bullshit.

I think the idea is that they turned out okay compared to non-gamers from the same time period. Although it's next to impossible to exclude other correlating factors, because those who played games likely had more similar demographics than compared with those who didn't.

As for speculations of why the late 30 early 40 somethings of today are so fucked up, I would guess that the conservative resurgence and Mrs. Reagan and "no child left behind" is part of the problem. A coddled generation taught to rote learn and not to think, and that the grown ups would do all the thinking for them. Not a good recipe for brilliance, in my opinion.

Comment A few considerations: (Score 1) 404

In Apple's defense, it does seem reasonably plausible that the biometric sensor widget built into the 'home' button(and quite possibly the cable connecting the home button to the logic board) is a 'trusted' element of the system, in the 'the integrity of the system depends on this part performing as expected and not being malicious' sense of 'trusted'. So, I can see why it would be impossible or prohibitively difficult to keep the biometric authentication feature secure while also allowing random people to swap random hardware in to that part of the system.

However, what is a lot less clear is why(especially when many iDevices, including current-model ones, simply lack this feature entirely) 'security' demands that the entire phone be bricked, rather than just the biometric features flushing any private storage associated with them and leaving the phone usable as though it were a model without that feature. This might involve wiping all locally stored data, if the device encryption keys are tangled up with the biometric authentication feature's private storage; but it should still be able to function as though you had just restored it to defaults.

This also raises the question of whether, with the correct incentives, it is possible to induce authorized repair services to introduce malicious components when doing these repairs, and whether doing so would allow you to extract highly sensitive information. Since Apple-blessed repairs can apparently fix home buttons without destroying the handset, and since Apple's line is that tampering threatens the integrity of the authentication system, this seems like a natural place to try to get your malicious part introduced: much more likely that an authorized repair outfit exists in your jurisdiction than that Apple Inc. does; many more low-level techs you could potentially lean on; and home button repairs are a pretty common service request...

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