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Comment: Re:Systemd (Score 1) 993

> lots of great software that a lot of people simply do not like.

Yeah and I am really famous but a lot of people don't know that.

I am also a fantastic cook but many people don't the taste of my cooking.

But you sound like an idiot, you judge a product on its technical merits, not whether it has any use or value. Your the kind of idiot who would implement an idea because it sounds noble and fuck whether it has actually does anything useful.

Comment: Re:Glaring Mistakes (Score 1) 226

I think this leads to a more pressing question: How do you decide where to balance technical accuracy with accessibility for the majority of people who won't understand it? Does the show count on getting away with some minor mistakes, knowing that 99+% of the audience won't catch it?

I've noticed several mistakes myself (in the handful of episodes I've watched with my girlfriend, who loves the show), especially around quantum physics (my preferred subject of study). I always wonder if they're deliberately introduced, or if they are genuine mistakes by the writers and/or actors due to lack of understanding or knowledge.

Comment: Is that so? (Score 1) 247

by SmallFurryCreature (#47764691) Attached to: Fermilab Begins Testing Holographic Universe Theory

Since the idea is that this universe is a simulation, who says it is a simulation of reality? Maybe we are some kids crazy fantasy world in which the container has to be larger then its contents! FREAKY!

The trick to thinking outside the box, is to stop thinking the box is real.

IF this is a simulated world, there is no reason to assume the rules in the simulation are the same as the ones of the world in which the simulation is running.

Comment: Re: Automated notice not necessary here (Score 1) 368

by Mattcelt (#47664535) Attached to: Comcast Drops Spurious Fees When Customer Reveals Recording

IIRC AT&T (I can't find a link, so my details may be off - YMMV) lost a case regarding this several years back, claiming that their "we may record this conversation" disclaimer applied to only the originally-disclaiming party.

To wit: if the other party consents to the recording of their own volition, you do not need to get additional consent to record, in any state. Their "this call may be recorded" statement provides their blanket consent to all recording.

Comment: Really? (Score 1, Insightful) 548

My salary has been steadily increasing and I certainly haven't found that there are skilled developers sitting idle at home. I can collect a small fortune in placement fees, if only I know some out-of-work developers I wouldn't be ashamed to recommend.

The simple fact from where I am standing is: There is a lot of work and there are not enough skilled people to do it yet we are only using 50% of the population.

But the sector has a massive negative image. Not even so much anti-women as anti-human. If you don't fight for yourself you won't get raises by just doing a good job and managers will happily have you do 80 hours with no compensation if they can get away with it. So a LOT of good developers I know have started their own businesses to get out of the rat race. You really got to love coding to stay with it when you can make money in consulting.

But part of the problem is the gigantic hatred you see on this site and sites like tweakers any time a story of this kind comes up. "The girls are getting some money, UNFAIR!". Crybabies. There are tons of initiatives to promote coding in general, plenty of competitions if you so wish, plenty of events to visit often with booth babes. No booth boys.

Let it go! Or at least accept that if this news story makes your blood boil, you got issues. And your issues are poisoning your work place or are even the reason you can't find a job despite your leet skills.

Nobody with real skills fears competition. If you see a new employee as anything but "FINALLY, some HELP, here is ticket 1000-9999, I take the remaining 1 million until you are up to speed", you are not a developer, real developers don't have enough spare time to worry about their jobs.

Comment: Re:Time capsule or doomsday timer (Score 1) 170

So what do you do when technology and law provides such an attractive feast for "content 'owners'" that it becomes impossible to purchase anything outright, and everything you pay for comes in the Netflix model?

To answer the OP's question, there is a solution: TecSec*. It provides a crypto-wrapper of sorts that allows for external data (literally anything quantifiable; e.g., geolocation data, time data, etc.) to be used as a condition for decryption. The notable caveat here is that you need a trusted source for the information to be used for criteria. But while difficult, it's possible to create a solution that will withstand (literally) the test of time.

*tecsec.com. Full disclosure, I am an acquaintance of the CEO, but we met because of the technology; I'm offering my opinion as a security professional, not a friend.

Comment: Re:Ripe for abuse (Score 1) 106

by Mattcelt (#47166889) Attached to: Tracking Tesla's Quiet Changes To the Model S

Agreed. Though I can only speak anecdotally, every wealthy person I know - which I'm defining here as would not need to earn any more money between now and the day they die and still live comfortably in their chosen lifestyle - is not a spendthrift.

One of the wealthiest men in the world balked at an aircraft avionics upgrade that cost less than his income for one day.

And more often than not, even seemingly-frivolous expenditures have ulterior money-making options that may have long-term returns. Richard Branson may seem a spendthrift, but I assure you that nearly everything he does has long-term gains in mind. (He is not the person referenced above, btb.) Some pan out, some do not. But an expenditure that is knowingly not a good buy is a rare event.

I don't know if the research is still the most current, but in the Millionaire Next Door study, the ONLY absolutely consistent factor for American millionaires was their marriage to frugal wives.

Frugality is very heavily correlated to wealth gain and retention; to the point where I'm comfortable calling it a factor in causation.

Comment: Re: Chip and PIN (Score 2) 210

by Mattcelt (#46881855) Attached to: Target Moves To Chip and Pin Cards To Boost Security

I still have a Target-branded chip-and-pin card and USB reader from 10+ years ago from an early pilot they did with a well-financed crypto startup. I would imagine some of their executives are kicking themselves now for having shut the project down then.

It's nice to see the US finally catching up with what Europe has been doing for a very long time.

Comment: I think the OP was talking about the 1-5k range (Score 1) 399

by SmallFurryCreature (#46864199) Attached to: Japanese and Swiss Watchmakers Scoff At Smartwatches

The top watches tend to be good (unless they are laden with diamonds) but the 1k-5k range is riddled with rather crap watches, often with mass produced innards from far cheaper models. This range you don't pay for the craftman ship, you pay for the brand name.

Even in the high end you got to check what you are buying, name, jewels or mechanics.

Comment: No it isn't impressive (Score 1) 399

by SmallFurryCreature (#46864189) Attached to: Japanese and Swiss Watchmakers Scoff At Smartwatches

The point is that tech advances and as you yourself admit, quartz is better.

The function of a time piece is to keep the time as accurate as possible and you admit that cheaper quartz watches do a better job then this particular mechanical watch. There are mechanical time pieces that do much better. So this time piece in question has no other function then being an expensive bit of jewelry.

There are some very good mechanical watches, Tag Heuer is not amongst them, it is a hipster thingy, more about flash (look at how much I cost) then actual value for money.

Wear what you like but please don't pretend that 1 minute out of date in a month is anything then mediocre.

When you don't know what to do, walk fast and look worried.

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