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Comment Re:There is no cure for absolute fucking stupidity (Score 1) 232 232

That's quite a little rant you put together, but it doesn't change the facts.

Fitness standards in both the US Marines (not to mention the US Army and other services) are "gender normed" rather than the same. Example:
Marine Corps Physical Fitness Test Points - Male
Marine Corps Physical Fitness Test Points - Female

Judging women on the mens scale will cause their scores to plummet.

Despite your attempt to misquote me and distort the meaning of what I wrote, the fact remains that the female office you so approve of wrote this:

But there came a point when I could not persuade my body to perform. It wasn’t a matter of will but of pure physical strength. My mind wanted more, but my muscles quivered in failure after multiple attempts. I began to shiver as I got cold. I was told I could not continue

PURE PHYSICAL STRENGTH.

Current and Past SOCOM Commanders Split on Women in Combat

The current SOCOM commander is limited in what he can say as a serving officer. The former commander is not so constrained and seems to have some insights that you lack. Do you plan to write him and insult his penis too?

You should probably read this paper:
New British Ministry of Defence Review Paper Shreds Case for Women in Ground Close Combat

Special ops forces fear standards will be lowered for women

Men in U.S. special operations forces do not believe women can meet the physical and mental standards to join their ranks, and fear the requirements will be lowered to integrate them into the elite units, polling shows.

The surveys, reported by The Associated Press, found widespread concerns in special ops that Pentagon leaders would "capitulate to political pressure, allowing erosion of training standards."

Some women already in the elite forces expressed similar worries, the AP said.

Frankly I'm amused at the silly insults you hurl at me, and find your attempts to denigrate me both pathetic and ineffective. You know nothing about me other than I have a view different than yours, one that is shared by no small number of warriors and people who have looked these matters on a serious basis. For all you know I could have been callsign leader in a Fireforce, or a member of C Squadron, a Seabee, a USAFSOC PJ, a Legionnaire with 2e REP, an FBI HRT sniper, an armored cavalry troop commander in 3rd ACR, or simply someone that bothers to be informed. Whatever I've done in life you'll probably never know what it was since I value my privacy more than I value the approval of Internet "tough guys."

For all your claims as to having "made the grade," or "made the cut," all of which are both vague and unsubstantiated, I don't see you bringing much to this discussion beyond what we could get from a communist dog catcher in some university district in Melbourne. Perhaps you actually were the chief supply clerk, underwear exchange, 1 Commando, or maybe something more interesting. All you seem to be today is just another internet "tough guy" twisting words and hurling abuse to try to compensate for a bad argument derived from strong political beliefs of dubious merit.

Pro tip: "Stand in the door!" does not mean you should queue at a building exit to wait for quitting time and the race to the parking lot.

Comment Flexibility is a feature (Score 1) 861 861

Electric car advocates continually make the flawed argument that because an electric car can have a daily range of 200 miles or so, it can replace the gasoline car for most users. This isn't true at all. People pay for gas cars not just to be commuter appliances, but to have transportation flexibility. Flexibility matters to a lot of people, even if they don't use it, it matters. It's nice to know that if I wanted to, I could drive my gas car the 790 miles to my in-laws house, or 200 miles to my brothers, or 500 miles to my aunts and uncles. It my cheaper for me to take a plane to go by myself, but, add a wife and a couple of kids, then my transportation cost for each trip is about $100-$150 in fuel and my time in driving.

So, with that in mind, I think the real tipping point for electric vehicles will be total operating time on a charge. That means, I want to be reasonably able to drive 10-12 hours on a long road trip with perhaps an hour time for charging. Once that happens, then electric cars will take over for everyone.

With that said, in a married family, having two vehicles, one for road trips, an SUV, and a daily commuter that is electric, makes a great deal of sense. But most families are going to have that "one" vehicle.

Comment Re:Don't buy the cheapest cable (Score 1) 272 272

The actual spec is behind a paywall, as with most tech specs, but Wikipedia says.

cable of about 5 meters (16 feet) can be manufactured to Category 1 specifications easily and inexpensively by using 28 AWG (0.081 mmÂ) conductors.[107] With better quality construction and materials, including 24 AWG (0.205 mmÂ) conductors, an HDMI cable can reach lengths of up to 15 meters (49 feet).[107]

You may be right, and this is just the physical consequence of the spec, but 28 AWG is quite thin wire. (One poster said his long cable has a booster, so maybe that's another way, but that's not "cheapest" either).

Comment Because someone will do it (Score 1) 183 183

Either states will decide you don't need insurance if you have a self driving car, or a company will spring up that will insure self driving cars for a lot less money.

It is one area where capitalism can work. Lets say all the existing insurance underwriters charge $100/month for normal insurance based on human drivers. At that rate they can cover the rate of claims and make a nice profit. Say $20/month ends up being net profit after their operations costs and payout are factored in, and operations are another $20/month.

Well lets say that self driving cars then have a 0.01% accident rate compared to human drivers (it may end up being lower than that). That will drop their payouts by a similar amount, so from $60/person/month to $0.60/person/month. Ok but they decide to keep the price the same, just make more money.

Thing is, they'd still be really profitable at $41/month, instead of $100. Someone else will realize that, and work to steal their business. They might not go that low, maybe $80/month, but it'll happen. Then they'll try to get it back and so on and so forth.

Remember that your costs aren't just based on your specifically, they are based on actuary data of accident likeness. Sure you've had no accidents, but there is a statistical probability that you will. You are in the lowest risk group likely, but it is there. If self driving cars are much lower, rates can again be much lower.

Also, have you checked around? My rates haven't gone up in a long time. Maybe your company is just screwing you because they can, and you'd save if you took your business elsewhere.

For comparison purposes I pay about $350/6 months for $200k/$500k liability insurance on an old, cheap, car.

Comment Re:When do I get to be a multinational corp? (Score 1) 281 281

In what reality do you live in that France is not part of the EU & thus hasn't signed treaties that give the EU the ultimate deciding power?!? Google could pull out of France tomorrow and sell through Ireland without France being able to do anything about it due to the accords on free movement of goods & services.

Again, if the French judges get what they are pushing for, judges in the rest of the EU are going to make everyone regret it.

Submission + - Critical BIND denial-of-service flaw could disrupt large portions of Internet->

alphadogg writes: Attackers could exploit a new vulnerability in BIND, the most popular Domain Name System (DNS) server software, to disrupt the Internet for many users. The vulnerability affects all versions of BIND 9, from BIND 9.1.0 to BIND 9.10.2-P2, and can be exploited to crash DNS servers that are powered by the software. The vulnerability announced and patched by the Internet Systems Consortium https://www.isc.org/blogs/cve-... is critical because it can be used to crash both authoritative and recursive DNS servers with a single packet.
Link to Original Source

Comment Insurance is not like music (Score 1) 183 183

Music by specific artists is a unique product -- another artist generally can't reproduce the same music in exactly the same way.

Insurance is the opposite. All auto insurance is essentially the same -- the differences have very little value. If one insurance company fails to update it's business model, 5 more insurance companies will swoop in and take the business.

Comment Re:"This could help extend the lifetime of the pho (Score 1) 54 54

You mean Samsung would know when to tell the phone "not" to open as per their planned obsolescence policy.

Hey, now, this isn't Sony we're talking about. ("Sony timer" was a common phrase in Japan for a few years, with a strong urban legend that actual timers were built in to pop the day the warrantee expired. My favorite urban legend was that Sony employees carried a remote that could expire all your Sony timers early if you annoyed them.)

Comment Re:Don't buy the cheapest cable (Score 1, Troll) 272 272

If offered a $45 HDMI cable over a $2 one, save your money and go cheap, heck by 3 of the cheap ones incase it breaks while installing it, you will be money ahead and you won't hear the difference EVER.

I hope you don't work with technology in any way. Sure, buy the cheapest cable that meets spec, but remember the first rule of engineering: the vendor is a lying bastard. There's a reason the cheapest cable is the cheapest cable. Paying $45 for a 6-foot HDMI cable is silly. Paying $45 for a 50-foot HDMI cable isn't.

Also, for HDMI specifically, the different numbered specs matter depending on use case. If your doing "4K" video, you'll want the HDMI 1.4 (or above) cable. If you want high color depth for a specific application, you'll want at least 1.3.

Sure, cheap is good, but as always in life, avoid the cheapest crap in the store.

Comment Re:Don't buy the cheapest cable (Score 2) 272 272

I've had cheap longer mini-jack cables fail - just break inside the insulation. I've had cheap RCA cables break, short, and most annoyingly have the center-pins break off and get stuck in my equipment.

Yeah, avoid the $40 job with the weird connectors, but a $4 patch cable can save a lot of headache over a $1 cable.

Comment Don't buy the cheapest cable (Score 5, Insightful) 272 272

This comes up whenever audiophile cables are discussed, but it's worth repeating: don't buy the cheapest cable.

There may be no useful difference between a $10 cable and a $1000 cable, but very often there's a real difference between a $10 cable and a $1 cable. Even for digital data, really cheap cables often don't meet spec, and can cause frustrating intermittent problems. You don't need anything exotic to avoid that, just avoid the bottom tier.

An example from my living room: I use a 45 foot HDMI cable to plug my TV directly into my HTPC (for reasons of convenience that aren't that interesting). The spec calls for thicker-gauge wiring for HDMI cables over 30 feet (IIRC), and you'll quickly see the price jump between cables that meet that spec and cables that don't. Don't buy the cheapest junk possible, that's all it takes.

It used to be that Dayton Audio was the only "solidly built, not too expensive" brand I knew about for cables, but Amazon changed that - now there are a bunch of options, including some sort of Amazon store brand that seems to be fine.

It's worth paying a bit more for solidly-built cables that meet spec (and especially for Ethernet cables, for some guard on the cable that keeps the clip from snagging or breaking off it you need to pull it through a tangle). Anything beyond that is a bit silly.

Comment Re:Please (Score 1) 327 327

Its like saying "Hey, Chevrolet, you know your customers like the radio station set to 101.9, why cant you engineer your cars to respect their choice instead of forcing your nefarious 101.5 agenda."

Yeah, but this is a Mozilla car analogy we're talking about here.

In the current 2015.7 model, release, the UX team has decided that a 5-button hamburger menu on an AM dial (and only from 1100Khz to 1150KHz in 10KHz increments) is all that's needed. Users who want to access a wider range of frequencies in the AM band are free to write an extension or purchase a third-party radio head unit.

To further improve the user experience, we remind prospective extension developers that in the Aurora channel for the 2016.1 model year, the about:config setting for frequency.megavskilohertz has been removed, along with the FM antenna. The UX team has made this recommendation based on telemetry that suggests that few drivers actually listen to FM radio, especially since the 2013.6 model, in which the AM/FM toggle switch was removed because the UX team for 2012.1 felt it was cluttering the dashboard.

"I'm not afraid of dying, I just don't want to be there when it happens." -- Woody Allen

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