Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

Comment: Re:Is it the Apps? (Score 0) 124

The marketing was good. The device sucked, and beyond the touch screen and including an actually adequate browser, was barely an incremental improvement over what was out there. Yeah, Pocket PC and Windows Mobile sucked, but the iPhone only sucked marginally less (and they had apps, the iPhone didn't).

The only thing Apple did aside the incremental technical improvement, was strike a deal for unlimited internet with a major carrier (which didn't last, btw), which got attention. More importantly, they managed to make it cool and hip, instead of being a geek toy. With those 2 things, Apple could have pushed out a white Pocket PC/Windows Mobile phone exactly like the ones that existed at the time, and ended with very similar results.

Comment: What happens... (Score 1) 587

When they ace it, end up in one of the ultra competitive CS schools (or work environment) and haven't been exposed to whatever it is that causes female students to not do well right now, all in one shot? It would even out eventually, but the first few batches will be in for a rude awakening.

Comment: Re:Lowest common denominator, to be expected (Score 1) 892

Yup, so here's the dirty secret that this ends up showing, assuming something like this became a lot more common.

Lower paying companies will end up with a higher percentage of women. The men will simply hold on offers and pick between multiple ones to get the higher paying ones. So you end up with lower paying companies full of women (who just took the job) and higher paying ones mostly with men who selected on that criteria (for better or worse).

Then in the news, the higher paying companies end up being called out for being sexist and not hiring enough women, even though it was basically self selecting by the candidates themselves.

End result: everybody loses.

Comment: Re:A modest proposal for equal pay for title... (Score 1) 892

Its so much more complicated than that. Roles and skill levels vary so much, along with the market itself, that the last rate previously negotiated may just not apply at all (right now, it would almost always be below unless you're hiring someone every other day).

Comment: Re:Tabs vs Spaces (Score 1) 428

by Shados (#49426471) Attached to: Stack Overflow 2015 Developer Survey Reveals Coder Stats

Pretty much. And the issue is that tabs gone wrong is only visible once its viewed by someone with different settings, which will be uncommon in homogeneous teams ("Whats your tab setting?" "2 space width" "Ok, cool, ill use that too!")

Then people brush it off in the code review or don't notice, and 6 weeks later its a mess.

Comment: Re:SQL (Score 1) 428

by Shados (#49426461) Attached to: Stack Overflow 2015 Developer Survey Reveals Coder Stats

This can be pretty trippy lately as the various "products" are diverging quite a bit.

I hadn't used MySQL in ages, and recently moved to a company that did for their smaller transnational dbs. It messed me up big time to see queries that had stuff in the select part that were not in the group by clause or aggregates.

Then someone asked me for help with a Vertica query...and that is pretty bizzare in itself, being a vertical store with fairly high postgresql compatibility. Some stuff you expect to work just plain don't for weird reason (if you're not used to it. They all make sense once you understand the product's limitations). Other things that are completely unthinkable on a normal relational dbs however work just fine there (doing a where clause on a column ran through a function on a 500gb column, which would cause an impossibly slow full table scan in a normal relational db, run nearly instantly...)

Its a big, big world out there...

Comment: Re:Like Coca Cola, git is the real thing (Score 1) 202

by Shados (#49419765) Attached to: 10 Years of Git: An Interview With Linus Torvalds

But once you really understand how Git works, you're ruined for every other version control system. When I'm forced to use TFS for a project, I use Git locally and Git-TFS to keep them in sync. Now I commit often, all day long, tracking all my changes and (relatively) easy rolling them back or reordering them if necessary.

Yup. I can deal with any language (ok, aside PHP...), any operating system (yeah, I don't mind developing on Windows), any framework, any technology...but source control has to be on git or I'm out.

No other tool affects my workflow so deeply at this point.

Comment: Re:Like Coca Cola, git is the real thing (Score 1) 202

by Shados (#49419759) Attached to: 10 Years of Git: An Interview With Linus Torvalds

Except when you forget the --rebase and now have hours of work fixing your tree.

Any merge conflict and you'll notice something fast what happened, and then you can simply abort. If someone there's no conflict, you can just look at the reflog and reset to the pre-merge commit.

Whoop-y-doo.

Comment: Re:Like Coca Cola, git is the real thing (Score 1) 202

by Shados (#49419737) Attached to: 10 Years of Git: An Interview With Linus Torvalds

And why then does it say in all kind of manuals that you should not use rebash unless you know what you are doing!

Because you shouldn't do anything without knowing what you're doing. That command is just unique-ish to git, so it requires a bit of special attention (you need to understand how the commit hashes work).

Once you do though, merge conflicts are 100x easier to handle, commit history makes more sense, etc. There's cases where you don't want to use it (when you want to be able to trace branching history or if you're merging the branch back upstream multiple times), but for most use cases, rebase away!

Comment: Re:Beware Rust, Go, and D. (Score 1) 223

by Shados (#49412101) Attached to: Mono 4 Released, First Version To Adopt Microsoft Code

There really isn't a neat for that many languages, even though you need quite a few to cover all the relevant use cases.

The biggest issue right now with languages though, is that you have language A, that specializes in a very particular use case. Then you have a group who wants A, but with an ecosystem and focus on another use case, so they create B. For a while, life is good, until zealots of A go and try to recreate A in ecosystem B, and vice versa. Then people need to create ecosystem and language C, and history repeat itself.

Case in point: Ruby/rails plaguing every dynamic language they can.

Comment: Re: Beware Rust, Go, and D. (Score 1) 223

by Shados (#49412087) Attached to: Mono 4 Released, First Version To Adopt Microsoft Code

F# is a better functional language than Scala (and isn't plagued by shit like Scalaz and Akka. Also, even though Scala itself is an excellent language, the JVM underneath limits it in weird ways with issues the CLR doesn't have), and C# is better than Java (and in certain, limited cases, better than Scala).

So the combination of both and the CLR, once it is fully cross platform and instrumentation/support ecosystem is available, would blow them out of the water. It probably won't happen because of the microsoft stigma though.

Comment: Re:#1 Productivity Boost: No Distractions (Score 1) 261

All you want me to do is code all day long.

Errr...no. Well, unless you're working for an outsourcing firm I guess. The coding part is trivial, and doesn't take that long. Figure out what to code, that's harder, and you're not going to do that right alone in your silo with a few hours per sprint of design sessions.

"I am, therefore I am." -- Akira

Working...