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Comment Re:Makes a lot of sense (Score 1) 58

What method did you use to confirm that anycasting wasn't being used and what were the exact results?

I don't run Windows 10 and I'm not responsible for any of the experiments regarding what network traffic it sends where. But advanced wizardry known as "traceroute" shows me that my traffic from the US to 94.245.121.253 crosses the Atlantic.

  . . .
  5 ae-2-52.edge2.NewYork2.Level3.net (4.69.138.227) 19.296 ms 19.289 ms 19.270 ms
  6 ae-2-52.edge2.NewYork2.Level3.net (4.69.138.227) 19.108 ms 19.011 ms 18.997 ms
  7 MICROSOFT-C.edge2.NewYork2.Level3.net (4.71.190.2) 16.850 ms 16.932 ms 16.798 ms
  8 ae0-0.lon04-96cbe-1b.ntwk.msn.net (204.152.141.190) 84.723 ms 84.726 ms 86.469 ms
  9 ae11-0.lon04-96cbe-1a.ntwk.msn.net (207.46.44.154) 84.502 ms
10 ae12-0.lon04-96cbe-1a.ntwk.msn.net (207.46.44.162) 84.467 ms
11 ae11-0.lon04-96cbe-1a.ntwk.msn.net (207.46.44.154) 87.672 ms
  . . .

The destination isn't accepting ICMP traffic, so the trace dies there in a hail of ^H, but the jump from New York to London is rather obvious. You're more than welcome to post a trace showing that your own traffic to that IP stays domestic.

Comment Re:Good for France. (Score 2) 74

So what do you do when laws in different countries are contradictory? Example: Certain speech being illegal in country A, but protected in country B?

I suppose you have two real choices,

1) block the speech from being seen in country A and allow it to be seen in countries B..Z

2) remove your business operations from country A

Take a look at Google, they've used both strategies in differing countries. Facebook itself is dealing with Belgium's ruling that they're no longer allowed to use cookies to track people who haven't signed up for the service.

My primary point is that Facebook does everything it can to minimize its tax liability in the US by shuffling money around, pretending to be based in Ireland and Luxembourg, etc. That's all well and legal for now, but in doing so, you're no longer an American company and should not have any claim to force overseas legal complaints into American jurisdiction.

Comment Good for France. (Score 5, Insightful) 74

At a very basic level, here's the deal. If you're going to operate as a multi-national company, and you're going to offer and promote your services around the globe, then you need to be responsible for and liable to the laws of the land in each of those territories. If you operate in France and you violate the law in France, then you should be subject to penalty in France.

You don't get to shuffle all of your American tax liability through a double Dutch Sandwich with an Irish muffin, or whatever the hell it is, and simultaneously force French legal complaints to be arbitrated in California. You can't have it both ways.

Comment Re:Makes a lot of sense (Score 2) 58

Government grants itself authority to break the law.

And governments around the world have entered into agreements to spy on each others' citizens to explicitly skirt the law.

From several recent news stories, Windows 10's biggest telemetry offender IP seems to be 94.245.121.253, which apologists are quick to tell you is "just a Teredo server" to assist with ipv6. No big deal, it's just helping the OS function! Don't pay any attention to the man behind the curtain, he's just making sure your internet works...

Funny, though, that IP is in the UK, yet Windows 10 installations in the US insist on connecting to it. That's definitely not a matter of efficiency or responsiveness or good customer experience, as the hop across the pond adds a few hundred milliseconds to every packet. For those who might need reminding, communications originating in the US where the endpoint is in a foreign nation are considered fair game for NSA snooping. And it's been known since the ECHELON revelations in the 90s that the "Five Eyes" group of countries have an arrangement to bypass laws against spying on their own citizens by engaging in reciprocal interception and sharing the data among themselves.

Something to think about, that's all.

Comment wrong (Score 1) 194

"Some researchers argue that autonomous weapons would commit fewer battlefield atrocities than human beings"

They would commit only as much atrocities as their master giving the order ,e.g. the generals handling the command, would allow them. Therefore it would still be HUMAN being declaring what's the ROE. 5% civilian casualty allowed. 20%. 100%. The number would be set by human. At least in the case of human we can have other human balking at atrocities and rebelling against order or getting taken to task after the war. With machine it would be a "I am not liable the machine misinterpreted etc...." bullshit shitfest. And with no easy way to demonstrate the falseness of it. And if it is machine there is FAR LESS incentive to say no to a war, when there is nobody from your country which will see the consequence. Body bags on TV are a very strong politic brake to wars, when they are "yours". Heap of scrap don't. So it is much easier to decide to go for a war. Which is why by the way we see so much bombing by the US using drone : they know there is nobody protesting much because no US body bags. So they bomb more and more. There is no incentive to slow that down. THIS is the real danger of autonomous or semi autonomous weapons : the lowering of the barrier of moral usage to almost nothing.

Comment Or it was an excuse (Score 1) 528

To go from Belgium to Croatia you have to go through multiple country. Either the IQ of the woman is so low that she should be barred from driving, or she simply used it as an excuse. "yeah I followed my GPS two day long" bullshit. She wanted to get away from where she was whatever was the reason (could be any reason) then after 2 day of blowing off she realized she was going off the rail and rather than admit anything she accused the GPS.

Submission + - Even with Telemetry Disabled, Windows 10 Talks to Dozens of Microsoft Servers (voat.co) 1

Motherfucking Shit writes: Curious about the various telemetry and personal information being collected by Windows 10, one user installed Windows 10 Enterprise and disabled all of the telemetry and reporting options. Then he configured his router to log all the connections that happened anyway. Even after opting out wherever possible, his firewall captured Windows making around 4,000 connection attempts to 93 different IP addresses during an 8 hour period, with most of those IPs controlled by Microsoft. Even the enterprise version of Windows 10 is checking in with Redmond when you tell it not to — and it's doing so frequently.

Submission + - Windows 10 TH2 (v1511) Console Host Enhancements (nivot.org)

x0n writes: As of Windows 10 TH2 (10.0.1058), the core console subsystem has support for a large amount of ANSI and VT100 escape sequences. This is likely to prepare for full Open SSH server/client integration, which is already underway over on github. It looks like xterm is finally coming to Windows.

OpenSSH was previously announced last year by the very forward looking PowerShell team: https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.c...

Comment If you can't spend them... (Score 1) 158

How does EU legislation have any effect on Bitcoin? Just ignore them, same as those who legislate the value of PI.

If you can't spend any BT in EU because BT are not traceable as legally required, what do you think is then the usefulness of BT for merchant ? Zero. For all practical purpose this would make for the crushing majority of people BT worthless in EU, barring doing illegal transactions.

Comment this si the flaw of the US process (Score 1) 634

"Well, d'oh. If you change the electoral process you can get different results"
 
Then your electoral process is deeply flawed. With a direct process like in my country, it does not matter how many time you partition and recount : sum are commutative and associative in the end you get the same final number. But with a represenative process you have shenanigan like gerrymandering and you can "win" election before the vote and recount can change the results. That alone should tell you haw deeply flawed the process is.

Comment nice looking graphs != useful graphs (Score 3, Informative) 59

They were glorified scan graphs some other company presented before which I can't recall the name. They used to have a software to which you could feed your firewalls logs and get a similar graphs (reverse lookup on country always showed my home IP as being from half a world away but i digress). The problem is that scanning does not mean threat or attacks, and those graphs means next to nothing beyond marketing. Sure nice looking. But empty of meaning.

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