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+ - Qubi Set to Reinvent the Media Center with Kickstarter Campaign->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Qubi is a new digital media center that incorporates powerful internals with an impressive user interface based of XBMC for Android providing users access to over 1 million apps in the Google Play Store including media streaming apps and console quality games. Qubi’s ability to add movie posters, CD cases, images, ratings and description for all local media creates the most complete entertainment experience at the $119~129 price point. Qubi will be based on the Snapdragon 600 SoC, which is the same chipset that the New Nexus 7 is based on. Featuring a state-of-the art remote control, Qubi will also enable any iPhone or Android to be used as a remote. Qubi seamlessly combines a casual gaming console, streaming media box and local media player, making it a new and fresh addition to the current market. Qubi’s Kickstarter campaign will end on December 7th, 2013, with a July 2014 planned release.

The actual planned hardware would be:

  Snapdragon 600 Chipset (APQ8064)
  1.7 GHz Quad Core Krait CPU
  Adreno 320 GPU Full
  1080p HD video decoding
  HDME-CEC
  1.4 HDMI Connection
  HDMI Passthrough
  16 GB storage
  2 GB Ram
  Micro SD Expansion Slot
  Dual Band WiFi b/g/n/ac
  Miracast Capability
  Gigabit Ethernet RJ45 Port
  Optical Audio
  1 x USB 3 Port
  3 x USB 2 Ports
  Bluetooth 4.0
  iR Receiver
  HD Audio Support Dolby & DTS

Please, pledge and support to make it a reality!"

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Earth

How Old Is the Average Country? 375

Posted by timothy
from the we-just-eat-a-lot-of-yogurt dept.
Daniel_Stuckey writes with a snippet from his piece at Vice: "I did some calculations in Excel, using independence dates provided on About.com, and found the average age of a country is about 158.78 years old. Now, before anyone throws a tizzy about what makes a country a country, about nations, tribes, civilizations, ethnic categories, or about my makeshift methodology, keep in mind, I simply assessed 195 countries based on their political sovereignty. That is the occasion we're celebrating today, right?"

Comment: Re:Just give them something? (Score 1) 1155

by Onthax (#33802918) Attached to: British Teen Jailed Over Encryption Password
Yes, i use it, that that's exactly how it works but if you play around with files in the outer (Duress) container it overwrites your good container the issue i was highlighting was to do with windows / applications linking to files that dont exist (Recently opened documents) also may raise some flags when all the files in your encrypted outer layer have a timestamp of old instead of a recent document link saying you opened it yesterday, that is where the legal challenge may lie
Open Source

Porting Aquaria To the PSP 25

Posted by Soulskill
from the welcome-to-your-new-home dept.
Apple Prophet writes "Just a few short weeks after BitBlot released the source to Aquaria as part of the Humble Indie Bundle, Andrew Church hacked up an ambitious homebrew port of the game to the PSP. He wrote a detailed synopsis of the technical challenges in an article on the Wolfire Blog, and of course, contributed all of the patches back to the project so anyone with a homebrew-equipped PSP can try it out. Check out the mercurial repository for the source."
Image

Amazon Reviewers Take on the Classics 272

Posted by samzenpus
from the eye-of-the-beholder dept.
Not everyone is a fan of great literature. In particular, reviewers on Amazon can be quite critical of some of the best loved classics. Jeanette DeMain takes a look at some of the most hated famous books according to some short tempered reviewers. One of my favorites is the review of Charlotte's Web which reads in part, "Absolutely pointless book to read. I felt no feelings towards any of the characters. I really didn't care that Wilbur won first prize. And how in the world does a pig and a spider become friends? It's beyond me. The back of a cereal box has more excitement than this book. I was forced to read it at least five times and have found it grueling. Even as a child I found the plot very far-fetched. It is because of this horrid book that I eat sausage every morning and tell my dad to kill every spider I see ..."
Australia

Good Language Choice For School Programming Test? 407

Posted by timothy
from the 'strailian's-too-difficult dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The Australian Informatics Olympiad programming test is being run in a couple of months. I'm an experienced programmer and I'm thinking of volunteering to tutor interested kids at my children's school to get them ready. There will be children of all levels in the group, from those that can't write 'hello world' in any language, to somewhat experienced programmers. For those starting from scratch, I'm wondering what language to teach them to code in. Accepted languages are C, C++, Pascal, Java, PHP, Python and Visual Basic. I'm leaning towards Python, because it is a powerful language with a simple syntax. However, the test has a run-time CPU seconds limit, so using an interpreted language like Python could put the students at a disadvantage compared to using C. Is it better to teach them something in 2 months that they're likely to be able to code in but possibly run foul of the CPU time limit, or struggle to teach them to code in a more complicated syntax like C/C++ which would however give them the best chance of having a fast solution?"

You can bring any calculator you like to the midterm, as long as it doesn't dim the lights when you turn it on. -- Hepler, Systems Design 182

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