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Comment: Re:Strawman argument (Score 1) 728

by NotSanguine (#47553213) Attached to: Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

Then I'm sure you won't mind when I call you an idiot, because the question is obviously if being abusive is morally correct and helpful. No one's saying you *can't* act like a jerk, they're saying you shouldn't, especially when holding a respected position.

Please. Speak your mind. If you don't like what I say, say something about it.

I would point out that context is an important part of any communication. I emphatically did not say that I think being verbally obnoxious, abusive, or as you put it, act like a jerk was a good idea, nor did I advocate it.

My point, since you obviously didn't get it the first time, was that if you limit one person's expression (whether that be via law, custom, culture or social pressure), you diminish us all, and set a dangerous precedent.

What is more, your morality is not my morality. Nor is it anyone else's. Morality is our behavior based on the moral choices each of us makes when confronted with a moral choice. That is not a group activity. Each individual must make their own moral choices and be willing to accept responsibility for the actions they take based on their individual moral choices.

I specifically noted that it is an open question as to whether Linus Torvalds' speech is helpful or not. But it's not my place (nor is it yours or the GP's) to attempt to restrict Mr. Torvalds' freedom of expression. If you don't like what he says, say so. Even better, explain why you don't like it. Perhaps you'll convince him.

Comment: Re:Strawman argument (Score 1) 728

by NotSanguine (#47553077) Attached to: Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

Ah, the old may/may not can/can not confusion.

In case you didn't notice, you didn't reply to what the GP said. You replied to a twisted version of it. A straw man version of it, one might even say.

What is more, I replied to SuperBanana's assertion that:

I specifically said: it's fine to tell people they did something wrong. What you may not do is be abusive.

Where exactly did I twist things in my response? How is my response a straw man? Perhaps I'm just a bit slow, but I don't get it.

N.B. This is more rope for you. Please, by all means, take it.

Comment: Re:Strawman argument (Score 1) 728

by NotSanguine (#47553037) Attached to: Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

Ah, the old may/may not can/can not confusion.

In case you didn't notice, you didn't reply to what the GP said. You replied to a twisted version of it. A straw man version of it, one might even say.

Your complaint about my word choice is wrong too. Strawman indeed.

Please carry on and don't take anything I wrote here as an admonition to cease expressing yourself. I would recommend that you give a little more thought to the things you say, folks might take you a bit more seriously if you did.

Justice Brandeis was and is correct that "... the remedy to be applied is more speech, not enforced silence."

Comment: Re:Actually, I can be abusive if I choose to be. (Score 1) 728

by NotSanguine (#47552965) Attached to: Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

No you can't, because the existence of abuse is dependant on the perceptions of person who believes they have been abused. It is not possible to abuse a rational person, you are simply correct or incorrect in your claims and they way you package the data is just a question of efficiency.

So has Linus made and incorrect claim and or done so inefficiently? I'd say no, the message was accurate, clear and memorable.

If people feel that Linus is being abusive they are in the wrong industry, or they can go and write their own OS, cuddlinix.

An excellent point, which fits nicely with the claim that the remedy is more speech, not censorship. And "Political Correctness" is a framework for cultural censorship.

That's not to say that I think courtesy and politeness are passe. Quite the contrary, in fact. However, Linus has continued to speak plainly, does not suffer fools gladly, and generally embeds (at least IME) his sharp (and often salty) comments in a matrix of humor and good sense.

Comment: Re:Strawman argument (Score 4, Insightful) 728

by NotSanguine (#47544909) Attached to: Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

Strawman argument. Nobody except you has posited that "all opinions are valid", and nobody suggested that criticisms can't be made. You invented that position to attack it.

I specifically said: it's fine to tell people they did something wrong. What you may not do is be abusive.

Actually, I can be abusive if I choose to be. It may not win me many friends and it may alienate the ones I do have, but I can certainly do so if I want.

Whether or not Linus advances Linux because of, or in spite of, being abusive is an open question.

As Louis Brandeis (and correctly, IMHO) pointed out, "If there be time to expose through discussion the falsehood and fallacies, to avert the evil by the process of education, the remedy to be applied is more speech, not enforced silence."

+ - Compromise struck on cellphone unlocking bill->

Submitted by NotSanguine
NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The US Senate has passed a bill (S.517) today allowing users to unlock their phones when moving to another provider.

From a recent article at thehill.com:

“Consumers should be able to use their existing cell phones when they move their service to a new wireless provider,” Leahy said in a statement. “Our laws should not prohibit consumers from carrying their cell phones to a new network, and we should promote and protect competition in the wireless marketplace,” he said. Grassley called the bipartisan compromise “an important step forward in ensuring that there is competition in the industry and in safeguarding options for consumers as they look at new cell phone contracts.” “Empowering people with the freedom to use the carrier of their choice after complying with their original terms of service is the right thing to do,” he said. The House in February passed a companion bill sponsored on cellphone unlocking from House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.).

"

Link to Original Source

+ - Letter to Congress: Ending U.S. Dependency on Russia for Access to Space 1

Submitted by Bruce Perens
Bruce Perens (3872) writes "I've sent a letter to my district's senators and member of congress this evening, regarding how we should achieve a swifter end to U.S. dependency on the Russians for access to space. Please read my letter, below. If you like it, please join me and send something similar to your own representatives. Find them here and here. — Bruce

Dear Congressperson Lee,

The U.S. is dependent on the Russians for present and future access to space. Only Soyuz can bring astronauts to and from the Space Station. The space vehicles being built by United Launch Alliance are designed around a Russian engine. NASA's own design for a crewed rocket is in its infancy and will not be useful for a decade, if it ever flies.

Mr. Putin has become much too bold because of other nations dependence. The recent loss of Malaysia Air MH17 and all aboard is one consequence.

Ending our dependency on Russia for access to space, sooner than we previously planned, has become critical. SpaceX has announced the crewed version of their Dragon spaceship. They have had multiple successful flights and returns to Earth of the un-crewed Dragon and their Falcon 9 rocket, which are without unfortunate foreign dependencies. SpaceX is pursuing development using private funds. The U.S. should now support and accelerate that development.

SpaceX has, after only a decade of development, demonstrated many advances over existing and planned paths to space. Recently they have twice successfully brought the first stage of their Falcon 9 rocket back to the ocean surface at a speed that would allow safe landing on ground. They have demonstrated many times the safe takeoff, flight to significant altitude, ground landing and re-flight of two similar test rockets. In October they plan the touchdown of their rocket's first stage on a barge at sea, and its recovery and re-use after a full flight to space. Should their plan for a reusable first-stage, second, and crew vehicle be achieved, it could result in a reduction in the cost of access to space to perhaps 1/100 of the current "astronomical" price. This would open a new frontier to economical access in a way not witnessed by our nation since the transcontinental railroad. The U.S. should now support this effort and reap its tremendous economic rewards.

This plan is not without risk, and like all space research there will be failures, delays, and eventually lost life. However, the many successes of SpaceX argue for our increased support now, and the potential of tremendous benefit to our nation and the world.

Please write back to me.

Many Thanks

Bruce Perens"

Comment: Re:No More Limited Upload Globally (Score 1) 234

by NotSanguine (#47517699) Attached to: Verizon Boosts FiOS Uploads To Match Downloads

Note that I most certainly did not say that those who disagree with me are probably brain-dead. I said that if the examples I gave weren't enough to elucidate my point that:

You were trying to drive into me your point that I hadn't said anything to the contrary about. Yes, calling people "brain-dead" because they don't accept your point is insulting and non-productive.

Actually, I wasn't responding to you in particular. Your post prompted me to express my thoughts about symmetrical bandwidth in general, and was not meant as a jab at you. Sigh.

Are you feeling a bit stressed today?

You cannot drop the insulting attitude even after it is pointed out to you and you pretend that you didn't mean it in the first place.

Actually, I can proceed as I choose. As can you (not pretending to give you permission, just pointing out what is). If you choose to interpret my statements in a way I didn't intend, that's your privilege. Language is inexact and without other, non-language cues as to my, as you put it, "attitude" I can see why you might interpret my writing that way. I suspect that your idea that I have some axe to grind with you (which I assure you, I don't) is based on the fact we disagree.

Your assessment of my state of mind is of no concern to me. Feel free to interpret me (or not) as you like. It doesn't irk me that you think I'm being disingenuous, although it does raise the idea that perhaps I should be more explicit in the future. In any case, please do carry on. Once again, have a nice day!

Comment: Re:No More Limited Upload Globally (Score 1) 234

by NotSanguine (#47504601) Attached to: Verizon Boosts FiOS Uploads To Match Downloads

I could go on, but if you don't get the idea by now, you're probably brain-dead.

I get the idea that you become insulting when someone doesn't value symmetric data service as much as you do. Was there another point, because if there was your insulting tone did a good job of masking it.

Note that I most certainly did not say that those who disagree with me are probably brain-dead. I said that if the examples I gave weren't enough to elucidate my point that:

It seems to me that providing symmetric high-speed connections is critical to the future of free speech, innovation, creative output and communications the world over.

I don't count disagreeing with me as not getting the idea. Given your response, you clearly did "get the idea" even though you disagree.

It seems you took offense at something not meant for you. Are you feeling a bit stressed today? Perhaps a cold drink, a massage, and some soothing music will calm you. Or not. It's not my concern. Nor is the fact that you disagree with me. I'm okay with that too.

I asserted that symmetric bandwidth was important to our society in a variety of ways, and gave several (IMHO clear and concise) examples as to why I believe that. Take from that what you will. Or not. Either way, have a nice day!

Comment: Re:No Decent Solution (Score 3, Funny) 82

A strong nation ID card would help such that even casual employment was not possible without prior approval by local police would go a long way towards stopping illegals from having the desire to get here. Yet businesses love lowering the wage pool by flooding illegal immigrants into the nation. I wonder just how much the price of groceries would jump if illegal farm labor was shut down. And the absolute bottom line is that reproduction as well as immigration degrades the quality of life for all of us. We need strict population size control.

You're absolutely right. Those people don't deserve to live here, thinking they can come to this country and have their descendants live here too! And all those wetback children using our diapers are a disgrace! We Americans have been here since the beginning of the American continent, formed as the super-continent Pangaea broke up starting about 175 million years ago. Immigrants must be stopped. They never gave us anything but trouble. But why stop with just keeping out the immigrants and limiting procreation (that's worked out really well in China, no?)? Let's get Swiftian on their asses! MMMM babies!

Comment: Re:No More Limited Upload Globally (Score 1) 234

by NotSanguine (#47503405) Attached to: Verizon Boosts FiOS Uploads To Match Downloads

"Fair" is a very subjective word. Who says it is fair to have everyone paying for service that they wont' use? Most people don't need the same upstream speed as they need down. Not even those who are using Netflix or downloading large Linux distributions need the same up as down. Only those sending out large amounts of data will see any difference, and that's only if the transmission is monitored in real-time and not just a background task.

As someone else pointed out, this change will make very little difference in the load imbalance at the peering points since most people aren't hitting an upload limit to start with.

It seems to me that providing symmetric high-speed connections is critical to the future of free speech, innovation, creative output and communications the world over.

When I can serve up my documentary on government malfeasance and allow dozens, if not hundreds of other people to pull my content easily -- and those folks can then host it for tens or hundreds of thousands more people, it becomes much harder for the "big lie" to succeed.

When I can host my own "social network" that links to those people I give a crap about, and there's no corporate slime drooling all over my personal data because I own *and* host it (think Diaspora) and my friends and connections host their own servers that I can connect or not connect with -- at my discretion, some semblance of privacy is recovered.

When I can write my own software or music or literature and distribute it without the (economic) censorship of the corporate world stifling me or that same crowd sucking up most of the profits, innovation and creativity will blossom.

I could go on, but if you don't get the idea by now, you're probably brain-dead.

Aren't you glad you're not getting all the government you pay for now?

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