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Comment: Re:GDP (Score 1) 717

by NormalVisual (#46261449) Attached to: Your 60-Hour Work Week Is Not a Badge of Honor
The argument for mandated vacation time would be primarily for the workers' benefit, i.e. society in general. That it would also work out to the company's benefit (in the form of happier/more productive employees) is a side-effect. We grant corporate status to organizations because there's a perceived benefit to society at large (encouraging investment), but when that benefit to corporate investors begins to adversely affect society as a whole, government has the right to step in and change things. Note that I'm not arguing either for or against mandated vacation time - I haven't studied the pros and cons enough to have an informed opinion right now, but I do own my own corporation and have opinions regarding their place in society.

It's kind of funny, because I'm largely libertarian in my beliefs, but it seems that not many people take into account the fact that the corporate veil is also an example of "interference in the free market" and feel like it's something they're entitled to without any strings attached.

Comment: Re:GDP (Score 1) 717

by NormalVisual (#46259969) Attached to: Your 60-Hour Work Week Is Not a Badge of Honor
It does not explain why the government should force a company to take actions which are in the company's interest.

One could also argue that it's within the government's rights to demand whatever they want as a requirement for the company to obtain and keep a corporate charter. Otherwise, those who wish to go into business are welcome to be personally responsible for their own debts and liabilities.

Comment: Re:Anyone could be a blogger... (Score 1) 137

A traditional journalist would be less likely to make false accusations in their line of work, because they could lose their job, and their employer could be taken to court.

A traditional journalist is also less likely to pursue politically sensitive stories for the same reasons. When was the last time you remember the White House press corps really hammering the President on a sticky issue?

Comment: Re:Out of curiosity (Score 1) 207

by NormalVisual (#45980359) Attached to: Previously-Unseen Photos of Challenger Disaster Appear Online
There were abort procedures, but all would have required waiting until after SRB separation and so wouldn't have been available to the Challenger crew. I watched the launch from my grandmother's house in Rockledge, FL, and I remember grabbing the binoculars hoping to see that somehow the orbiter got away.

+ - Supreme Court Refuses to Hear Newegg Patent Case

Submitted by NormalVisual
NormalVisual (565491) writes ""It's a really tough time to be a patent owner", said Soverain Software, LLC president Katharine Wolanyk, after the Supreme Court refused to hear their appeal after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit invalidated three of Soverain's shopping cart patents. Soverain had sued Newegg for allegedly infringing the patents in question, and had won in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas. Newegg later had the decision overturned on appeal, with the court ruling that the patents in question were obvious, and thus invalid."

Comment: Re:Thermal protection (Score 1) 195

by NormalVisual (#45930691) Attached to: Tesla Sending New Wall-Charger Adapters After Garage Fire
Actually I think you're right. I looked a little more closely at the charging options, and I was assuming (always a recipe for failure) what was involved was one of the high-power charging adapters with the LEDs (which is where you'd have to have the DC circuitry), but I see now that it wasn't one of those involved, and that they have to be wired directly to the panel and not through a plug on the back, which totally deflates my argument. The standard cable that comes with the car is much smaller, with a regular cable and connector for the 240 volt socket, and you're probably right that the wart has just the GFCI and rudimentary sensing circuitry that is likely directly on the power line.

Sorry for wasting your time on this. :-) You're absolutely right that it's unusual to fuse the power plug itself.

Comment: Re:Thermal protection (Score 1) 195

by NormalVisual (#45926359) Attached to: Tesla Sending New Wall-Charger Adapters After Garage Fire
Putting one in the plug to try to detect that the outlet is overheating is non-standard.

You don't really fuse the charger to detect wiring faults in the outlet (although it's helpful in case you have something like 230V on a 115V outlet), you do it for the more common case where the transformer, regulators, or something else fails and start getting hot, and it's quite common that chargers are fused as I mentioned before.

Comment: Re:WTF (Score 1) 195

by NormalVisual (#45925021) Attached to: Tesla Sending New Wall-Charger Adapters After Garage Fire
There are plenty of (much smaller) battery chargers and battery packs out there that incorporate thermal fuses, enough to where people complain about them blowing and accuse the manufacturers of planned obsolescence. Yes, most electric ovens are thermally fused, and pretty much every household dryer has one as well.

Comment: Re:WTF (Score 1) 195

by NormalVisual (#45922523) Attached to: Tesla Sending New Wall-Charger Adapters After Garage Fire
If you RTFA you would see that Musk talks about home wiring not always being done properly, so in order to avoid leaving that variable up to chance, Tesla has sent out chargers that shut themselves off at a certain temperature. Its almost like he cares if his customers are happy and hes willing to do what it takes to alleviate as many issues as possible while using his product, even when not caused by his own product.

As opposed to designing the charger to handle this not-particularly-outlandish possibility to begin with?

Comment: Re:Cost? (Score 1) 310

by NormalVisual (#45882937) Attached to: Linksys Resurrects WRT54G In a New Router
Attic is usually a better place for electronic equipment...

Not where I live. You'd be looking at $300 or so each month just trying to keep the equipment from frying in the 100+ degree heat up there during the summer unless you spent a ton of money putting walls and insulation in. Of course flooding is a concern with a basement installation, but there are ways to mitigate that risk.

Comment: Re: Wait What? (Score 1) 190

by NormalVisual (#45877329) Attached to: Ecuadorian Navy Rescues Bezos After Kidney Stone Attack
Pain control, lots of water, and wait for it to pass.

Unless they're too big. Like you, I've had multiple occasions of having them, but the last time they were too big to pass and had to be broken up over multiple procedures after they put stents in. And God help you if you have staghorn stones.

I don't want to achieve immortality through my work. I want to achieve immortality through not dying. -- Woody Allen

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