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+ - Windows XP Black Market-> 1

Submitted by NicknamesAreStupid
NicknamesAreStupid (1040118) writes "As Whoever57 pointed out, there are some who will still get support for Microsoft Windows XP — the 'haves'. However, most will be the 'have nots'. Anytime you have such market imbalance, there is opportunity. Since Microsoft clearly intends to create a disparity, there will certainly be those who defy it. What will Microsoft do to prevent bootleg patches of XP from being sold to the unwashed masses? How will they stop China from supporting 100 million bootleg XP users? And how easily will it be to crack Microsoft's controls?

How big will the Windows XP patch market be?"

Link to Original Source

Comment: Why go negative? (Score 1) 393

by NicknamesAreStupid (#46678259) Attached to: Why Are We Made of Matter?
Antimatter is so derisory. Must we put such a polarizing label on something we do not fully understand? If people referred to me that way, I would not hang around, either.

Of course it matters that we are made, and whatever we are made of quantum-wise, we should be proud, even if it destroys us when we come together.

I vote for calling it 'matter-of-fact'.

P.S. I appreciate StartsWithaBang renaming it from, "Why are we layered fatter?"

Comment: I'm just fuckin' with ya (Score 1) 465

by NicknamesAreStupid (#46420033) Attached to: Apple Refuses To Unlock Bequeathed iPad
It would not be the first time the deceased left a will with a prank inside. Given the vulture-like disposition of some relatives, she might have left the map to her fortune inside the iPad. I would. Without the password, the data would be lost, as the password is used to encrypt the data.

Comment: I heard from a totally unreliable source . . . (Score 4, Funny) 390

by NicknamesAreStupid (#46419901) Attached to: Bitcoin Inventor Satoshi Nakamoto Outed By Newsweek
. . . that it was actually the K**h brothers who contracted with the Russian Mafia to invent Bitcoin, and they set Nakomoto up as the fall guy. I'm sure it is totally bogus, in spite of the salaciousness and viral rumor-mongering appeal. Has anyone got any completely unsubstantiated confirmation of this?

Comment: Re:Bread buttered (Score 0) 355

by NicknamesAreStupid (#42423753) Attached to: Free Software Foundation Campaigning To Stop UEFI SecureBoot
This is the end of the motherboard era. LIke Mainframes (that are doing well, BTW), the motherboard has seen its heyday. Intel is de-emphasizing them in favor of processors for mobile, and AMD is looking pretty sad, see http://www.techradar.com/news/upgrades/graphics-cards/motherboards/computing-components/processors/computing/pc/why-the-pc-of-2020-could-be-bad-news-for-modders-1117302

As a desktop guy from way back (my 1st was a H89 that I built myself), I find this news to be depressing. However, the handwriting is on the wall. Once the volumes of desktops drop, the motherboard will become the exotic anomaly and hardware hacking will be the domain of the Raspberry PI generation.

Comment: Has anyone noticed recent performance declines? (Score 1) 186

by NicknamesAreStupid (#42256893) Attached to: Netflix Ranks ISP Speeds
I live in the shadow of Google but have AT&T DSL and use it to watch Netflix. In the past six months, performance has deteriorated significantly, dropping from an average of 1.35Mbps to 800Kbps and sometimes less. AT&T has tested the link to the CO and found it meets their service level standards.

I have spoken with other locals who expressed similar problems with Comcast. If you look at the sales of iPads and other tablets, their growth seems to track against this slowdown. Have these new tablets, streaming YouTube, Vimeo, and Netflix, put a strain on the local ISPs? I doubt if theISP's provisioning would keep up with sudden demand.

Comment: They Laughed at Einstein, Too. (Score 1) 289

by NicknamesAreStupid (#42182919) Attached to: Wiki Weapon Project Test-Fires a (Partly) 3D-Printed Rifle
Until Leo Szilard made him famous. You can argue about a theorem, but you can't argue with a nuke. When the next Leo prints an AR-15 and shoots his critics, then Gutenburg will be as glorious as Einstein, and nobody will fuck with a publisher. Someday, they will have a printer that can build an Abrams M1A2. Of course, that tank will be a rare antique by then, but I'll be the first to order one.

1st Amendment meets 2nd Amendment, and they kick ass - William Randolph Hearst had wet dreams about this.

Comment: It All Went West (Score 2) 421

First, Silicon Valley sent the silicon (fabs) to Asia. Then, they outsourced labor to Asia. Then most start-ups needed an "Asian talent connection" (H1-B visa, India/China engineering, etc.) to get funding. Then,the VC set up offices in Asia. Now, those offices fund Asian start-ups. Asia is where the action is, and that is where the money is, too.
Hardware

+ - How Would You Use An Arduino Compatible Flashlight?-> 1

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "After its highly successful Kickstarter project and a year of development, HexBright, claimed as the world's first open source flashlight, has reached production and will ship in time for the holidays. The device's 500 Lumen LED module is controlled by an Atmel AVR ATmega168PA microcontroller, and can be programmed to do cool stuff using standard Arduino development tools. Several sample custom programs have already been posted to the HexBright GitHub. What would you make one do?"
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Microsoft

+ - US court to Motorola: You can't enforce Injunction in Germany against Microsoft->

Submitted by Chris453
Chris453 (1092253) writes "A U.S. appeals court on Friday ruled that Google Inc's Motorola Mobility unit cannot enforce a patent injunction that it obtained against Microsoft Corp in Germany, diminishing Google's leverage in the ongoing smartphone patent wars. Motorola won an injunction against Microsoft in May using their H.264 patents. Apparently the US federal justices in California have worldwide jurisdiction over all court cases, who knew? Maybe that is why Apple keeps winning lawsuits..."
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FORTRAN is a good example of a language which is easier to parse using ad hoc techniques. -- D. Gries [What's good about it? Ed.]

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