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Comment: Non-story (Score 5, Informative) 322

by NeoRete (#33761354) Attached to: New York To Spend $27.5 Million Uncapitalizing Street Signs
In another article about this states that NYC replaces 8,000 signs a year anyway due to wear and tear and has until 2018 to finish.
From the article:

The additional cost to the city, if any, will be "marginal" because it receives a steady stream of state funding for routine sign repairs and replacement, DOT spokesman Seth Solomonow said. The life of a typical sign is about a decade, so most of the city's signs would be replaced in the next few years anyway, Solomonow said.

They didn't follow federal regulations on road signage, but are fixing them now as part of regular maintenance.

Privacy

+ - White House ordered to preserve all e-mail->

Submitted by Verunks
Verunks (1000826) writes "A federal judge Monday ordered the White House to preserve copies of all its e-mails in response to two lawsuits that seek to determine whether e-mails have been destroyed in violation of federal law. The issue surfaced in the leak probe of administration officials who disclosed Valerie Plame's CIA identity"
Link to Original Source
Patents

Vonage Hit With $69.5M Judgement 234

Posted by kdawson
from the hard-to-get-customers-after-that dept.
andy1307 writes "The Washington Post is reporting that Net telephone company Vonage Holdings Corp. was ordered in federal court Tuesday to pay Sprint Nextel $69.5 million in damages for infringing on six telecommunications patents owned by competitor Sprint Nextel Corp. In addition to the damages, jurors awarded Sprint Nextel a 5 percent royalty from Vonage on future revenues. It was the second verdict against Vonage this year. A jury in Virginia determined in March that Vonage had violated three Verizon patents in building its Internet phone system. The jury awarded Verizon $58 million in damages plus 5.5 percent royalties on future revenues. Greg Gorbatenko, a telecommunications and media analyst for Jackson Securities, said the decision 'feels like a death knell' for Vonage because future revenue will likely dry up, preventing the company from investing in better technology or improving customer service."

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