Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Deal of the Day - Pay What You Want for the Learn to Code Bundle, includes AngularJS, Python, HTML5, Ruby, and more. ×

Comment Error in the Summary (Score 1) 1

That summary doesn't make sense - I thought hitting 'enter' would submit the tag, not the entire submission; I wasn't done editing. It should read: "Although Barnes & Noble receives a lot of credit from the slashdot community for standing up to Microsoft and for allowing the nook to be so easy to root, perhaps Amazon releasing the source code to the Kindle will help it gain back supporters it lost after remotely removing ebooks."

Submission + - Vengeful programmer gets two years in prison (

coondoggie writes: "Putting a finishing punch on what was a nasty online retribution attack, a federal court in New Jersey has sentenced a former programmer to two years in prison, plus three years of supervised release for building a botnet-based virus that infected about 100,000 PCs and attacked a number of media outlets such as Rolling Stone and Radar."

Submission + - Why Google Pushes Chrome So Hard (

An anonymous reader writes: Google executives commented during the quarterly earnings call, between the lines, on the importance of Chrome. The only purpose of the browser appears to be locking users into Google search, which may also be an explanation why Microsoft is countering Chrome so fiercely these days. IS IE9 simply a defense against Google swallowing search and advertising market share?

Submission + - Stock Market Slams Google For Investing In R&D (

jfruhlinger writes: "Google's stock is dropping in the wake of yesterday's earnings announcements, which showed that, among other things, the company is continuing to invest in R&D and hire new people. But investors might be wise to scoop up Google stock now, as these investments are probably going to pay off in the long run."

Submission + - Truste wants to add tracking in IE9? (

Roberto123 writes: "Truste, a company focused on protecting online privacy and security, is defending itself against complaints from a privacy group about its role in the creation of a Tracking Protection List (TPL) for users of Microsoft’s Internet Explorer 9 Web browser. When a beta version of Truste’s TPL for IE9 was released in February, it listed nearly 4,000 domains for Web sites that users should allow to do tracking, causing the privacy group Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) to call it “anti-privacy technology.” But Truste says the final version of its TPL is much shorter."

Comment Re: NO (Score 1) 335

Almost, but not quite. There shouldn't be a comma before "and" in the first sentence. The remainder of the sentence, "may have had the ability for some time", isn't an independent clause.

I wait 2 years before my first slashdot post, proofread it multiple times, have my girlfriend proofread it, and then get an "impeccable grammar" praise.

Then you have to come along and take it all away.

Damn you I say, damn you Mr. 4 digit! ...I'm going back to my corner now...


Submission + - Google Chrome now has resource-blocking adblock (

MackieChan writes: "It seems to have slipped under the radar, but Google Chrome now has resource-blocking abilities, and may have had the ability for some time. Using the "beforeload" event on the document, an extension can now intercept resources from loading. Adblock for Chrome has already added it, and I expect the other 'ad-blocking' extensions have as well. Before you start praising Google, however, its the WebKit team that deserves your credit; one chromium developer responded to praise by stating '... thank Apple — they added it to WebKit, we just inherited it.' Firefox vs Chrome just got a bit more exciting."

Submission + - Mozilla's New JavaScript Engine Coming September 1 (

An anonymous reader writes: Mozilla has reached an important Milestone as its new JavaScript engine “JaegerMonkey” is now faster than the current “TraceMonkey” in a key benchmark. Mozilla wants JaegerMonkey to be faster than the competition and launch on September 1, which means that JaegerMonkey will make it into Firefox 4.0.

Submission + - US court strikes down media swearing ban (

mysidia writes: A federal appeals court in Manhattan struck down a policy of the FCC which banned broadcasters from allowing curse words on live TV. The court concluded the rule was unconstitutionally vague and had a chilling effect on broadcasters. In the 2 to 1 ruling, the court found that policy was "arbitrary and capricious", but that the FCC might be able to craft a policy that does not violate the First Amendment.

"'By prohibiting all `patently offensive' references to sex, sexual organs and excretion without giving adequate guidance as to what 'patently offensive' means, the FCC effectively chills speech, because broadcasters have no way of knowing what the FCC will find offensive,' the appeals court wrote."

Fox Stations, owned by News Corp., and other networks had brought suit in 2006 after the FCC cited use of profanity during the airing of awards programs.

Submission + - eBay sued for $3.8 bln in PayPal patent case (

Zerimar writes: From TFA: "According to the complaint filed Tuesday by XPRT Ventures LLC in the federal court in Delaware, eBay allegedly stole information shared in confidence by the inventors on XPRT's own patents, and incorporated it into features in its own payment systems, such as PayPal Pay Later and PayPal Buyer Credit."

"The most important thing in a man is not what he knows, but what he is." -- Narciso Yepes