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Comment Re: Isn't this why computers are great (Score 1) 219

No they don't have to. It's just better for society if they do.

I wonder how the Founding Fathers managed, since their books, pamphlets, newspapers didn't have comments sections.

I'm still waiting for a single citation of a comments section that has been "good for society". Some bit of evidence that it does something besides play into people's confirmation bias.

Comment Re: Isn't this why computers are great (Score 1) 219

It has to do with the internet providing a place where people can discuss what was said by journalists.

You mean like this one? In case you haven't noticed, there is an endless number of places where people can discuss what is said by journalists. It doesn't mean the journalists have to provide one.

The papers can do what they like of course but that doesn't mean their newfound intolerance of criticism is a good thing for free society.

And yet, here you are criticizing the fact that there is intolerance of criticism. You don't see the wee flaw in your argument?

Comment Re: Isn't this why computers are great (Score 1) 219

I would never trust a "journalist" that isn't willing to open themselves up to public feedback.

I understand that. But does it mean that it is the obligation of the journalist to provide and maintain a forum for instant feedback at his own expense? And further, to do so with protection of anonymity?

Technology has given us limitless avenues for speech. Anyone can put up a website, submit a story, be a source. You can feed back to your heart's content. A guarantee of free speech is not the same as a guarantee to be heard by everyone. If it were, I'd have my own cable news network (where everyone would have Scottish accents, by the way, because I find them amusing). Instead, I've got fooking nowt, innit?

Comment Re: Isn't this why computers are great (Score 1) 219

So, journalism did exist before there were online comments sections. It just doesn't anymore.

Of course it does. You just have to look for it. And don't expect to see comments sections when you do find it.

If you're looking for journalism in mass media, you're right. It doesn't exist any more.

Comment Re: Doesn't sound very credible to me (Score 1) 166

So, despite that "particulate emissions from petrol cars are so low that they are not routinely measured" and can "emit 25 to 400 times more mass of particulate black carbon and associated organic matter ("soot") per kilometer" the fact that petrol cars may release twice as much particulate means that they've suddenly caught up?

Your ideas are based on outdated conclusions which do not take into effect the linked study.

Anecdotally, the rise of diesel is making buildings grimier than they have been since the smogs of London and Paris were beaten into submission.

That's nothing compared to what gasoline engines are doing to your lungs.

Comment Re:We patched your patch (Score 1) 33

This is the one point that should never be ignored. If the updater has access to the raw files, then it has the job of actually installing them where they need to go, and it would need admin privileges for that. And since the entire point of the post was that the updater shouldn't have admin privileges, well, this isn't a red herring, and this shouldn't be ignored.

Well, no. The comment never actually insisted that you be able to install updates without privilege escalation. Go read it again! And frankly, the suggestion that you should be able to is a stupid one. There are lots of reasons why you shouldn't be able to do that, and I should not have to enumerate them here for you. If you have any IT experience at all, you should know what several of them are.

The idea of having executable installers is that the installer, not the downloader, has the onus placed upon it to ask for admin privileges.

Good news! You can download the packages without privilege escalation! The installer is a separate tool, which won't work without it. You need privilege escalation to update the list of installed packages (with good reason) and you need it to update the list of available packages (also with good reason) but you can in fact schedule the list updates, and you only need to update the list of installed packages when you are installing packages.

There are very good reasons to protect installed packages. Do not make me explain them to you.

Comment Re: Isn't this why computers are great (Score 1) 219

Yup it does. The comments section is where a story can be refuted or additional information that was left out can be found and even have a remote chance of being seen by someone who just read the article.

You can refute stories and add information all you want, on your own platform. Journalists do not owe you a comments section and it's not "censorship" if they decide not to have a comments section.

I mean, where do you get this stuff? Do you think journalism didn't exist before there were online comments sections?

Comment Re: Isn't this why computers are great (Score 2) 219

They have everything to due with free expression, which is ultimately the point of journalism.

Please find me a definition of "journalism" that includes free expression for people who have absolutely nothing to do with journalism.

Using the N-word in a comments section, doesn't make you a journalist. Calling Obama a "muslin" in a comments section doesn't make you a journalist.

Full Definition of JOURNALISM

a : the collection and editing of news for presentation through the media
b : the public press
c : an academic study concerned with the collection and editing of news or the management of a news medium
a : writing designed for publication in a newspaper or magazine
b : writing characterized by a direct presentation of facts or description of events without an attempt at interpretation
c : writing designed to appeal to current popular taste or public interest

Comment Re:This is *SO* unethical ! (Score 1) 219

Sadly, EULAs and the like tell them they can do this. Courts have upheld it. Which means taking them at their word is pretty much useless.

What? If the user who wants to participate in online discussions on a private company's web site agrees to a EULA that states that the owner of the web site reserves the right to change the conditions of using the site, then that's exactly what you signed up for. The only "sadly" involved is users sadly not reading what they agree to. Most people in the gimme-dat-free-stuff mindset don't think things through anyway.

Real names policies exist because companies say "what value can I get from selling the fact that SuitWrinkler53 commented on the website?" and deciding that they can't sell that information.

Or, if you're a publisher, those policies exist in order to spare the publishers huge ongoing legal expenses in dealing with inquiries and even subpoenas related to digging out real names or other information about trolling, libelous, or otherwise criminal users.

And then you realize they don't know much about the underlying technology, and are probably using something like WordPress.

No, then we realize that you're talking out of your ass and haven't bothered to so much as view the source on one of their pages in order to see that you're wrong. And that the paper - like so many who can't afford to go about it in any other way - are using a third party SaaS solution. Which means a single code base for many clients, which means no, customizing it for one customer isn't always desirable or even do-able.

They just have to remind you it's technically private property, and that the license says they can change the terms if they wish.

Oh, so you DO get it. What are you bitching about, then?

Neutrinos have bad breadth.