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Comment Re: They also believe (Score 1) 105 105

Don't be silly. We went from cars to the moon because two of the richest and most powerful countries funneled a significant part of their money, talent, and resorces to make it happen. And had deep pockets to survive multiple failures and ability to spend zillions of dollars.

Compare this to a startup that seems to have equally grandiose ambition but a fraction of the ability and resources.

Nobody is pulling you down from trying any of these moonshot ideas. But if you want people to really believe that you have a good chance of succeeding, you need to do more than have fancy ambitions. Especially if you are asking people to i vest their money and their careers on your dreams.

Too many people are drinking the bay area koolade.

Comment Re: Obvious fail is obvious... (Score 1) 335 335

That is funny and actually true for many audiophiles. The burn in myth.

But i find it interesting that no one called out ars on their shoddy experiment. If you are going to bother going through a scientific ish experiment, at least do it in a better manner.

Someone who buys a "high performance part" would be doing it on a system with other components that are well built. DACs and preamps and power amps and sources with well built power supplies, components with matching impedances, high quality speakers or headphones that offer neutral and accurate audio reproduction. Such as Sennheiser 800s or even studio monitors.

And you use well mastered and well recorded audio that has enough instruments, enough detail, enough dynamic range, enough variety - that you are testing accurately and comprehensively.

If you are going to test a high end car part for example, no matter how hokum it sounds, you will still test it on a high performance car, on a track, and driven by pro or amateur racers. In other words, enthusiasts.

You will not likely put the replacement part in a corolla and ask someone to drive it on neighborhood lanes.

Apologies for the car analogy. But i find it disingenuous that no one has sarcasm and derision when people spend stupid money on cars, parts, components, etc. And there are ricers and there are serious performance enthusiasts, and there are people who will pay a million for a vintage.

But there is a special kind of sneering that happens only with high end audio equipment. I submit that there is a lot of snake oil, as it is in many other pursuits and hobbies as well. But getting accurate audio reproduction is extrely difficult and fiddly. The component setup is extremely fragile in terms of how small inocuous component changes do make audible differences. Good or bad. And that is what some take advantage of.

You can choose where you want to draw the line.. i.e. how much of an enthusiast you want to be. But as in other pursuits, for the true enthusiast, there is often no point of diminishing return. There is only the pursuit.

So be gentle, please!

Comment Re:Interesting argument (Score -1, Troll) 79 79

The communication is between humans and humans. A human at one end craft content and store in on a computer in a accessible format. The end user then crafts a request for that information and sends it via the internet and the stored communication from the content creator is then delivered to the end user.

So you are an author who sits in front of a word processor and writes a magazine article ("crafting content," in your language). That article is then printed in an "accessible format," called a magazine. The end user (reader) then "crafts a request" by sending in a magazine subscription request, and the content is then delivered to the end user. Sound about right? We should definitely regulate magazine publishers, making sure that they can't decide how many to print, how many pages to create, which advertisers they should contract with, how often they publish, or which letters to the editor the choose to print. Because we can't have all of that unfairness, especially if the publisher decides they'd rather make arrangements themselves to deliver their printed material to news stands or find other ways best suited to their advantage to get their publication in the hands of their audience.

their claim basically is that an answer machine hooked into a phone service means that it is no longer a telecommunications service

No, that's you making stuff up. The telecommunications service is the telephone service between you and the answering machine that happens to answer the call. The telephone service between the two end points is no different when you talk to an answering machine than when you talk to a person who answers the call instead. It's exactly the protocols, the same bandwidth, the same use of the resource during the exchange ... makes no difference, answering machine vs. human.

A network of computer networks passing routable packets around based on peering agreements between the operators of those separate (frequently privately owned) networks is NOT the same as making a phone call.

that email is not communications

I get it, now. You're being deliberately obtuse. You're trolling.

Their point is that having some servers pass around packets of information using a protocol like SMTP is exactly NOT like making a phone call. If you're saying that anything that is a form of communication is the same as a phone call, then please get back to hand-delivered daily newspapers, for example, and explain why that process shouldn't be subjected to the laws that impacting the publisher of a web site who wants to fatten up the network routes - even if it costs money - to make sure his audience gets a good, timely view of the content.

Their claim is so laughably stupid that the court should penalise them for making it.

As laughably stupid as not knowing how to spell "penalize?" Your half-baked vitriol on the subject is an example of exactly why this topic is a bad fit for most people, cognitively. Please don't do things like vote if it involves similarly complex subject matter. Thanks.

Comment Re:The Intel memory management unit (MMU) .. (Score 1) 90 90

Remember this is Slashdot, so if someone cites "design flaws" without any more detail I'm going to assume they don't understand the design space and are unreasonably expecting perfection along an arbitrary line that represents some specific use case of theirs that most people don't even care about.

Remember this is the internets, and if you can't use google, you're gonna have a bad time.

https://www.blackhat.com/us-15...

https://github.com/jbangert/tr...

I searched "flaws in intel mmu" and got these results back in the top ten. Perhaps you should learn to internet, coward.

Comment Re:My upgrade strategy (Score 2) 145 145

However OS X and Windows, is less struggling for hardware compatibility. Linux seems to be hit or miss, unless you invest a lot of time trying to determine if it is compatible enough, as many of discussions on such hardware fail to state if it works with a distribution or not.

IME the big stuff is iffy on Linux, the small stuff on Windows. But there's a user in this thread finding that Windows 10 refuses to install on his Core 2 Quad. Maybe Linux actually has better hardware support than Windows? I think it does. I think if you took a windows disc and a Linux disc and tried to install both on every single PC on the planet, that you would have better luck with the Linux disc. In the trial, you are permitted to install only authorized packages, meaning drivers either direct from the OS distributor (from the package archive, from windows update, on the CD) or from the OEM or ODM (e.g. Compaq or Atheros.)

I think you'd have less machines that just outright refuse to install, and you'd also have more working peripherals at the end of the day. For example, all but one of the scanners I have ever owned, I got cheap used because they weren't supported on newer versions of windows even though the same scanner protocol was still in use; the manufacturer simply removes support for the old hardware from the new version of the driver, even though the new driver is perfectly capable of operating it. HP is especially horrible about this, never ever buy a scanner from them and expect to use it through an OS upgrade. Same for all-in-one imaging devices. But everyone does it. Meanwhile, SANE just keeps adding support for more devices...

Comment Re:MenuChoice and HAM (1992) (Score 1) 265 265

.BAT files on DOS / Windows provided that functionality too, but unless you aggressively restrict yourself to a subset of the shell language it's very hard to check a .sh / .bat file and see exactly what command is going to be invoked.

Almost. There's no way to prevent command.com (or cmd.exe) from popping up a window when you run a batch file without using the shortcut settings. Whereas on X, you don't get GUI output unless you explicitly ask for it.

unless you aggressively restrict yourself to a subset of the shell language it's very hard to check a .sh / .bat file and see exactly what command is going to be invoked.

Hence comments

Comment Re:Local CO2 (Score 1) 64 64

I think instead of relying on "data" which are just numbers, you should ask somebody who is an expert in the field, like me.

Oh yeah, I really want to know what "Noah Haders" has to say about... anything. The only identity you've provided is that of a Slashdot troll. No one has any reason to believe anything you say. I certainly don't believe you're an expert at anything but trolling.

Comment Re: Solution: Don't Trust Anyone (within reason) (Score 1) 78 78

Hey, stop the scaremongering. It works very much differently. You don't add value to this discussion.

You add so little you didn't even log in and be counted, because you know you have nothing useful to add. But that didn't stop you from being a hypocrite, did it?

Most people Can be scared to hell by a few ex marines taling them in the local shopping mall. For life!

Yeah, for me it was all the times my not-just-a-dry-drunk alcoholic ex-marine father told me he knew a shitload of ways to kill me, when he was drunk and pissed off. Guess who's anti-military?

Comment Re: So much stupid (Score 1) 102 102

So you're saying that even with uber-militarized police nothing can be done about gangs?

Of course something can be done. But it's politically incorrect to do so. The most violent gangs are thick with illegal aliens from Central America. The leftier side of US politics really wants to be able to take legal Latino votes for granted. So they angle for policies that do everything possible to avoid ruffling feathers in that area ... including giving sanctuary to people who end up being enforcers for MS13, etc.

To deal with gangs like that, you have to actually arrest people and then once they're in prison, actually keep them there. We don't do nearly enough of that - the revolving door has those guys right back in action after short terms, and their habits of recruiting minors for a lot of their dirty work means little or no jail time for a big part of their operations. If they're deported, they just show right back up because we have a completely porous, unenforced border. That's only true because the federal government isn't bothering to do one of its main missions (controlling the border), and that is a 100% political problem. The existence and violent toxicity of powerful, organized, nation-wide gangs (like MS13) in the US is then left to local law enforcement to deal with.

So yes, when they move to deal with a place known to be protected by a bunch of MS13 soldiers, you better believe they want to show up with heavy equipment. Would you bring a nightstick to arrest a bunch of MS13 enforcers who consider killing police officers, cartel-style, to be a sport and a point of pride?

But none of that has to happen. Controlling the border and not tolerating tens of millions of illegals in a shadowy cash economy rife with internal, organized crime - it's a matter of political will. But because there are politicians who are too timid to talk plainly about it, and who would rather play identity politics in a craven hunt for votes, we have a system that perpetuates rather than addresses the problem. And the local cops get to risk their necks as a result. If I were in that line of work, yeah, I'd want an armored car when serving warrants, too.

Economics is extremely useful as a form of employment for economists. -- John Kenneth Galbraith

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