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Comment Re:Keto (Score 1) 80

It would be nice to have a low carb replacement for flour that would provide a convincing replacement for bread, chips and pasta. You can kind of do some stuff with almond flour, but I haven't always been impressed with it.

I'd like to see something more interesting done with pork rinds, even. They're not a bad replacment for crunchy chips, but it seems like the only kind you can find are really bad BBQ or "spicy" flavors. It would be nice to have some kind of yellow corn or neutral flavorings that could be used with guacamole or salsa. I stumbled across a decent nacho cheese flavor on a trip -- you can order them online, but there's like a 2 case minimum and that's a lot of commitment.

Comment What happened to Pascal, anyway? (Score 1) 65

I remember in the 1980s it seemed like kind of a big deal, an "advanced" programming language that required a compiler and a more real computer than an Apple ][ (although, yes, there was a Pascal system for the ][, IIRC it was worthless without two disk drives and really not an ideal platform). I knew people writing commercial software in Pascal. They taught it when I was in college. I think "Inside Macintosh" Vols. 1-3 that documented the Macintosh used Pascal.

It was kind of everywhere, and then it wasn't. What happened to it? Was it not really meant to be a "practical" language and meant to be kind of an advanced educational language? Did the growth of Unix-like systems on x86 push everyone into C? Did stuff like the availability of maybe Visual Basic or something grab the users who would have used Pascal?

Circa 1986 or so, you wouldn't have thought "kind of a dead language, nobody uses it for anything anymore" and you wouldn't have thought it would get that way any time soon.

Comment Re: Just stop now (Score 1) 103

You must live in a different London to me. The majority of black cabs (Addison Lee don't count in the strict definition) absolutely do not take cards. It's cash or nothing. I got in a cab today and that hadn't changed. In my London, black cabs didn't want to take people south of the river for several years. They only ended up doing it when it became a precondition for them to charge even more. If they'd hadn't been incentivised to do so then, to this day, I probably still wouldn't have been able to get home by cab in the early hours of the morning.

Comment Re: Humn.... That one is hard. (Score 2) 208

Crom, I have never prayed to you before. I have no tongue for it. No one, not even you, will remember if we were good men or bad. Why we fought, or why we died. All that matters is that two stood against many. That's what's important! Valor pleases you, Crom... so grant me one request. Grant me revenge! And if you do not listen, then to HELL with you!

Comment Re:he should know better (Score 4, Insightful) 208

It is incredible how many people bring "free speech!" up in conversation where it is not warranted.

It's actually more incredible how many people think that freedom of speech is only a concept in relation to governmental restrictions on communication.

Obviously private party restrictions on speech aren't a violation of 1st Amendment rights, but it should be more than obvious that freedom of speech can be threatened by private restrictions on speech by refusing access to media, venues or physical places which are commonly accepted as public spaces.

Comment Re:Education (Score 1) 477

I think part of it is a mindset that every problem has a solution, and that existing problems remain problems only because whoever gets to decide doesn't like the solution.

I'm sure everyone in IT has been at the point where euphemistically the solution to a problem is just to nuke the old system and start over because the problems in the old system are so complex and intractable that fixing it isn't practical on any timescale and replacing it is more time efficient.

I think applying that kind of thinking to political and social problems is probably a very easy step for a lot of people to make.

I also think that engineers are prone to thinking of "correct" and "incorrect" answers -- I've known plenty of IT people who once they latch onto "the correct" answer can't see any other solution -- even ones that solve the same problem -- as correct. There's one right answer. 1 + 1 = 2 and everything else is *wrong*.

Comment Re:Comedy of errors (Score 1) 786

Right because somone who does not possess electronics knowledge can tell the difference between a PCB for a cheap electronic clock and one that is some kind of detonator.

The school officials, and the police, all asserted that they had exactly that ability, as none of them actually invoked a single procedure that they had in place for dealing with a suspected bomb.

Schools get evacuated on the basis of a single anonymous phone call which says there's a bomb in a locker. It happens on a regular basis. Yet when they had the device IN HAND, they very obviously made the determination that it was in no way, shape or form dangerous. They did not evacuate the school. They did not call in bomb disposal. The teacher kept it in a desk drawer for a fair length of time. The police transported the 'device' in the same vehicle that they used to perpshame Ahmed.

They didn't just believe it wasn't a bomb, they made a specific determination, at every level and at every point in the debacle, that it wasn't a bomb, and SPECIFICALLY CHOSE to not invoke the procedures that all start with 'If there is ANY possibility that there is a bomb, do this....'

Comment Re:Why would Disney do this? (Score 2) 260

You've never been to Disneyworld, have you?

The entire fucking place is one giant network, down to the RF wristbands ("magicbands") used by guests to do everything from unlocking their rooms, paying tabs everywhere throughout the entire resort, getting on rides, entering the parks, everything.

And let's not forget that pretty much every ride and attraction runs or is directly dependent on computers. It's like Steam, but connected to animatronics.

Disneyworld is the most IT-driven place I've ever been to.

Comment Re:No! (Score 2) 786

Being arrested requires that charges be filed.

Incorrect. You're 'detained' of the officer stops you for any reason. You're 'under arrest' if you don't feel free to leave, if the police transport you anywhere, or uses force to prevent you from leaving. The officer requires 'reasonable suspicion' to detain you, and requires 'probable cause' to arrest you, but it DOES NOT need to lead to charges. The officer can reasonably believe you were commiting a crime, then turn out to be wrong, or have new evidence come to light without it having been false arrest.

Your twenty minutes is plucked out of the air and meaningless.

Actually, it's a rule of thumb applied by the SCOTUS. Google it a bit and you'll find all sorts of case law, opinions, and the like.

Otherwise, google 'detention versus arrest' and you'll find all sorts of legal jurisprudence about it. Like this. Or this. Or even this.

TLDR: You can be 'detained' on suspicion. If you're not free to go, if the officer moves you, or if the officer starts calling in backup, drug sniffing dogs, and the like, you're under arrest. If he develops 'probable cause' to believe you've committed a crime, he can arrest you.

Comment Patent reform can fix this problem (Score 1) 361

We can fix this problem and get patent reform at the same time.

After 3 years, patents issued to foreign based or owned companies can't be enforced against US owned companies making products in the US that utilize them. Patents issued to American owned companies using the patent to make a product in the US can enforce them for the normal time against anyone.

This solves the problem with obnoxious multi-nationals hoarding patents by making them only useful for a very short time. It discourages US companies from "inverting" for tax purposes but largely remaining American corporations (and thus benefitting from taxpayer provided legal, diplomatic and protection but skipping out on the taxes). And it encourages businesses to make products in the US.

Of course companies with insanely good and hard to make products may choose not to sell them here because of this, but the upside is there'd be an incentive and means to make them here by other means and for the most part, willfully refusing to sell in the American marketplace is like throwing money away.

There's no reason that the patent system couldn't be used as a tool to encourage business in America and discourage evading paying for the very civil society that makes business work. Hopefully now Pfizer will be utilizing the vast resources, long reach and deep influence of the Irish government to enforce their patents, lobby governments when they don't get the treatment they want, when, say a new drug is copied in China or India or when the FDA doesn't approve it.

You cannot have a science without measurement. -- R. W. Hamming